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Dr K K Aggarwal

Gambling in Indian Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Gambling is mentioned during Diwali celebrations and also in the story of Mahabharata. It teaches us about taking calculated risks in life.
  • In Mahabharata, it teaches that excess of everything is bad. If Yudhishthira had not risked Draupadi on that day while plying dice, there would have been no Mahabharata. The same divine dice game became a vice for that moment.
  • Even if you lose while gambling, don’t lose heart; instead take conscious-based decisions. Krishna (consciousness) saving Draupadi (material things in life) means the same.
  • On Diwali day, one starts with new projects in life and taking calculated risks makes sense.
  • Gambling on Diwali can be a symbolic game but should not become a vice.
  • According to mythology, Goddess Parvati enjoyed playing dice with Lord Shiva on this day. It’s a popular saying that those who cling to virtue at this festival time, refusing to gamble, will be reborn as donkeys meaning that it’s foolish not to take calculated risks in business.
  • Losing and winning is part of life and one must learn to balance the two states of mind.

Eating Out Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Curb portions: Always order for one if you are two people and if you are alone set aside some of what is on your plate to bring home.
  • Resist refined carbohydrates.
  • Load your plate with colorful choices at the salad bar with vegetables, fruits, and small amounts of lean protein. Skip the creamy dressings.
  • Choose dishes that are grilled, roasted, steamed, or sautéed.
  • Don’t be afraid to request a salad, vegetables, or fruit instead of starchy side dishes.
  • In non–vegetarian food, order only fish or seafood.
  • If you decide to have dessert, share it with your dining companion(s).

Think differently in mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Lord Ganesha with the elephant’s head depicts that one should use their wisdom before taking any decision.
  • Vishnu’s first incarnation, fish, symbolizes learning to swim in the opposite direction.
  • Brahma’s five heads denote using all your five senses before taking any decision.
  • Shiva’s third eye means to think differently in difficulties.
  • Ravan’s ten heads mean using your ten senses/emotions before taking any decision. But, Ravan used them for negative forces.
  • Maha Mrityunjaya mantra begins as we worship the three-eyed Shiva.
  • Gayatri mantra means that one should ask the heart to direct the intellect to take the right decision. The 3H philosophy is linked to the same. The first H is ask the head for options; second H is to ask the heart to choose one of the options and the third H means to order the hand to do the action

Some health tips from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Maintain a healthy weight. Check your waistline.
  2. Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  3. Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph). Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.
  4. Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.
  5. Earlier clinical trials reported in up to date have found that exposing patients to music for 15 to 20 minutes prior to and/or during a procedure reduces anxiety levels in samples of patients undergoing various procedures like colposcopy, cystoscopy and gastrointestinal; cesarean delivery; mastectomy; port catheter placement, day surgery, flexible cystoscopy; and hysteroscopy.
  6. An observational trial in patients awaiting surgery found that patients’ subjective reports of decreased anxiety were consistent with heart rate variability, an objective marker of anxiety.
  7. Music did not show a benefit during endoscopy in a trial of patients under conscious sedation.

Is time and place of death pre-defined?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Some gurus teach us that the time and place of death is predefined and some do not. I personally feel that it is life and respiration that are predefined and not the day and time of death.

The following example can help understand this. Water in a sponge will become empty when every drop of water comes out but it does not matter how much time it takes to come out. It is therefore possible to postpone or prolong the fulfillment of Prarabhdha Karma and postpone death.

As per the Karma theory, unless our Prarabdha Karmas (decided at the time of death and birth) are enjoyed and fulfilled, one cannot die. But once the Prarabhdha Karmas are fulfilled, death is inevitable. Another unanswered question is ‘can Prarabdha karma be modified’? Fate or destiny may not change, which means one may not be able to prolong the quantity of life but can definitely change the quality of life. The quality of life can be changed by modifying Agami karmas (present Karmas).

Sanchit Karmas can be burnt with the file of knowledge about self. Prarabdha Karmas have to be experienced and Agami Karma can be neutralized by positive and negative Karmas to Zero in the present life.

The last few Prarabdha Karma experienced can thus be slowed down by the net positive result of their Agami karmas.

Diabetes mainly linked to obesity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with obesity. More than 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to obesity.
  • There is a curvilinear relationship between BMI and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Lowest risk is associated with a BMI below 22 kg/m2
  • At a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2, the relative risk for diabetes adjusted for age increases to 61. The risk may further increase by a sedentary lifestyle or decrease by exercise.
  • Weight gain after age 18 years in women and after age 20 years in men increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • The Nurses’ Health Study compared women with stable weight (those who gained or lost <5 kg) after the age of 18 years to women who gained weight. Those who had gained 5.0 to 7.9 kg had a relative risk of diabetes of 1.9; this risk increased to 2.7 for women who gained 8.0 to 10.9 kg.
  • Similar findings were noted in men in the Health Professionals Study. The excess risk for diabetes with even modest weight gain is substantial.
  • Weight gain precedes the onset of diabetes. Among Pima Indians (a group with a particularly high incidence of type 2 diabetes), body weight gradually increased 30 kg (from 60 kg to 90 kg) in the years preceding the diagnosis of diabetes. Conversely, weight loss is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • Insulin resistance with high insulin levels is characteristic of obesity and is present before the onset of high blood sugar levels.
  • Obesity leads to impairment in glucose removal and increased insulin resistance, which result in hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia contributes to high lipid levels and high blood pressure.

The 3 Cs: Don�t Criticize, Condemn, or Complain!

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Don’t Criticize, always look for positive in a person or a situation. There is always something positive in every situation.
  • Don’t Condemn a situation (and a person) howsoever small it may be.
  • Don’t Complain, unless it is a must.

You will refrain from these 3 Cs if you are laughing. By avoiding the 3Cs we avoid a lot of arguments that would usually naturally occur when you criticize, condemn or complain. If we criticize, condemn, complain, show resentment, or gossip about others, it comes back to “us.” If we praise, support, encourage and forgive others, this too comes back to us.

First aid for poisonous bites and stings

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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People often panic if they have been bitten or stung. You should tell the patient that many snakes, spiders, insects and sea creatures are harmless and that even the bites and stings of dangerous animals often do not cause poisoning. Keep the patient calm and still. Moving the bitten or stung limb speeds up the spread of venom to the rest of the body. Fear and excitement also make the patient worse. The patient should be told not to use the limb and to keep it still and below the level of the heart. The limb may swell after a while, so take off the patient’s rings, watch, bracelets, anklets and shoes as soon as possible. A splint and a sling may help to keep the limb still. Avoid doing the following:

  • Do not cut into the wound or cut it out.
  • Do not suck venom out of the wound.
  • Do not use a tourniquet or tight bandage.
  • Do not put chemicals or medicines on the wound or inject them into the wound (for e.g., potassium permanganate crystals).
  • Do not put ice packs on the wound.
  • Do not use proprietary snake bite kits.
  • The patient should lie on one side in the recovery position so that the airway is clear, in case or vomiting or fainting.
  • Do not give the patient anything by mouth – no food, alcohol, medicines or drinks. However, if it is likely to be a long time before the patient gets medical care, give the patient water to drink to stop dehydration.
  • Try to identify the animal, but do not try to catch it or keep it if this will put you, the patient or others at risk. If the animal is dead take it to hospital with the patient, but handle it very carefully, because even dead animals can sometimes inject venom.
  • As soon as possible, take the patient to a hospital, medical dispensary, or clinic where medical care can be given. The patient should not walk but should keep as still as possible. If there is no ambulance or car, carry the patient on a stretcher or trestle, or on the crossbar of a bicycle.
  • Antivenom should only be given in a hospital or medical Centre where resuscitation can be given, because the patient may have an allergic reaction. If available, antivenom should be used if there is evidence of severe poisoning. It should not be used when there are no signs of poisoning.

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is what Lord Krishna taught to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling, from 2 to 17 chapters, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

All about Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications
  • People with diabetes are nearly two times more likely than people without diabetes to die from heart disease, and are also at greater risk for kidney, eye and nerve diseases, among other painful and costly complications. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications.
  • In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin. In type 2 diabetes the body makes insufficient insulin or does not use insulin well.
  • Gestational diabetes occurs in some women during pregnancy. Though it usually goes away after the birth, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes later in life.
  • Type 2 diabetes has begun to affect young people.
  • Losing a modest amount of weight — about 15 pounds — through diet and exercise can actually reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes by as much as 58 percent in people at high risk.
  • In type 1 diabetes, tight control of blood sugar can prevent diabetes complications.
  • Choose healthy foods to share.
  • Take a brisk walk every day.
  • Talk with your family about your health and your family’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.
  • If you smoke, seek help to quit.
  • Make changes to reduce your risk for diabetes and its complications — for yourself, your families and for future generations.

Is it necessary to take a dip in Ganga to remove your sins?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Ganga, Yamuna and Saraswati, the sangam of the three rivers in Allahabad is believed to be the holiest place in the country where if one takes a dip, one washes away his or her past sins.

After death, ashes are also submerged in the Ganga with an assumption that the past sins will be removed.

In Vedic era, what was the intention of the rishis and munis while making this ritual?

In mythology, moon represents cool mind and Ganga represents the positive flow of thoughts. And sea turmoil indicates the disturbed state of mind.

Hanuman’s samudra yatra indicates the meditative journey through the flow of thoughts. Samudra manthan represents the journey of the mind during meditation.

Taking a dip can be equated to shifting your mind towards your consciousness. This may occur when you introspect in a relaxed state of mind or when you practice meditation. Meditation is defined as a journey from sympathetic and parasympathetic state of mind or a journey from disturbed state of consciousness to undisturbed state of consciousness.

Every time you meditate, you dip into your consciousness and clean your guilt and negative thoughts. It is something like reformatting your hard disk and removing the bad sectors and viruses in your software.

It is, therefore, possible for you to do Ganga snan (bath) at your house in the morning while meditating or during pooja by drifting away from disturbed state of mind to non disturbed relaxed state of mind clearing your guilt and negative thoughts.

Treatment of acute leg cramps

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Patients with an acute leg cramp should forcefully stretch the affected muscle, as an example by active dorsiflexion of the foot with the knee extended, when the cramp is in the calf.

Some patients may also find relief from passive stretching by getting out of bed and standing with the foot flat on the floor then pressing downward firmly, although active dorsiflexion of the foot may be more effective.

Other measures that may offer relief from the acute cramp include:

  • Walking or leg jiggling followed by leg elevation
  • A hot shower with the stream directed at the cramp area of the body, usually for five minutes, or a warm tub bath
  • Ice massage

Why do we not offer onions to God?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Anything that grows under the ground is not offered to God. According to Vedic science, anything which is grown under the ground is Tamasik in nature and produces sluggishness, heaviness and extreme aggressiveness. Not only onion, all food products grown under the ground are not offered to God and are not supposed to be eaten during spiritual fasts. People who are spiritually-oriented like monks, rishis, munis avoid underground food altogether. Some people try to convert Tamasik food into Satvik food by slow heating them or by sprouting them or by soaking them in water. This is one reason why boiled potato is eaten during Vrat.

6 ways to ease neck pain

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Don’t stay in one position for too long.
  2. Make some ergonomic adjustments. Position your computer monitor at eye level so you can see it easily. Use the hands-free function on your phone or wear a headset. Prop your touch-screen tablet on a pillow so that it sits at a 45° angle, instead of lying flat on your lap.
  3. If you wear glasses, keep your prescription up to date.
  4. Don’t use too many pillows.
  5. Know your limits.
  6. Get a good night’s sleep. (Harvard News Letter)

The lips of truth shall be recognized for ever, a lying tongue is but for a moment

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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This sutra from Bible has a very deep significance in day to day life. The truth is ever lasting and always ends up in internal happiness and self-realization and in the long run always gives you happiness and an all-win situation. On the contrary, a lying tongue will only give you a momentary pleasure but will lead to or create some difficulty later in life.

Spoken words cannot come back just as in the case of a released arrow from the bow. Once lost, one cannot get back their youth, virginity, or respect. Similarly, spoken bad words cannot be taken back and once spoken will create negative waves in the other persons (on whom they were spoken) mind which will persist as repressed thoughts or memory in the people’s mind forever. Such bad memories will keep on coming back in the person’s mind causing damage to the personal relationships.

A spoken word is a karmic expression. For every karmic action there is an opposite and equal reaction. For every negative karmic expression one has to pay the debt either now or in future. The law of karma says that every debt has to be paid. It is always better to avoid negative language both in spoken words as well as in the mind. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali describe thinking, speaking or doing anything wrong as having the same karmic significance. We should not only purify our self in actions and spoken words but also in the mind. If a person keeps negative thoughts in the mind sooner or later the same will be reflected to the outside world.

The momentary pleasure which one gets by “lying” has no spiritual significance as it only satisfies your ego sense or makes you attached to any of the five senses. The transient pleasure experienced by the body stimulates a chain of reactions, consisting of action, memory and desire leading to action again, which will only intensify the greed & attachments.

In the Mahabharata, Lord Krishna has given only two examples, which work as an exception to such a situation. Any truth which harms others may not be spoken and any lie which does not harm anyone but benefit a few may be spoken.

Truth is the opposite of doubt & it is always better to clear all the doubts from the mind as any repressed doubts can end up into causation of heart attack, paralysis and cancer.

Truth also means taking conscious-based decisions as the consciousness will never lie. While taking any decision, one should always ask oneself— Is it the truth? Is it necessary? Will it bring happiness to me and the people around?

Lord Krishna is also described as “Satchitanand”, which only indicates qualities like truthfulness, conscious based decisions and internal happiness. The practice of truthfulness has to be practical over a period of time and made a part and parcel of your daily life. To start with a person may have bad experiences but in the long run truthfulness will always win.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).