Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Why do we put on Tilak on the forehead?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Why do we put on Tilak on the forehead?

The Tilak is a mark of auspiciousness and invokes a feeling of respect in the wearer and others. It is recognized as a religious mark. Its form and color vary according to one’s caste, religious sect or the form of worship of the person in question.

Tilak is applied on the forehead with sandal paste, sacred ash or kumkum, a red turmeric powder. In a wedding, a Kumkum tilak is applied on the forehead of both the bride and groom.

In earlier times, the four castes (based on varna or color) – Brahmana, Kshatriya, Vaishya and Shudra – applied marks differently. The Brahmin applied a white chandan mark signifying purity, as his profession was of a priestly or academic nature. The Kshatriya applied a red kumkum mark signifying valor as he belonged to the warrior race. The Vaishya wore a yellow kesar or turmeric mark signifying prosperity as he was a businessman or trader devoted to creation of wealth. The Shudra applied a black bhasma, kasturi or charcoal mark signifying service as he supported the work of the other three castes.

The devotees of Shiva apply sacred ashes (Bhasma) on the forehead as a Tripundra (three parallel horizontal lines); the devotees of Vishnu apply sandal paste (Chandan) in the shape of “U” and the worshippers of Devi or Shakti apply Kumkum.

The tilak is applied in the spot between the eyebrows, which is the seat of memory and thought. It is known as the Aajna Chakra in the language of Yoga. The Tilak is applied with the prayer – “May I remember the Lord. May this pious feeling pervade all my activities. May I be righteous in my deeds.” Even when we temporarily forget this prayerful attitude, the mark on another reminds us of our resolve. The tilak is thus a blessing of the Lord and a protection against wrong tendencies and forces. The entire body emanates energy in the form of electromagnetic waves – the forehead and the spot between the eyebrows especially so. That is why worry generates heat and causes a headache. The tilak cools the forehead, protects the wearer and prevents energy loss. Sometimes the entire forehead is covered with chandan or bhasma.

Using plastic reusable “stick bindis” is not very beneficial, even though it serves the purpose of decoration.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Cough Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Cough Hygiene

  • When you cough or sneeze, you tend to expel out respiratory waste, which can be droplets (larger than 5 microns) or airborne droplet nuclei less than 5 microns; both have different implications.
  • Droplets remain suspended in the air only for a limited period and exposure of less than 3 feet is usually required for human to human transmission of droplet-borne respiratory organisms. In flu, this can be up to 6 feet. The examples of droplet infections are meningitis, influenza, rubella (German measles), etc.
  • No precautions need to be taken by a person, who is at a distance of 6-10 feet away from the patient. But, if a person is sitting or working even at a distance of 3-6 feet, the non-coughing person should wear a simple mask.
  • Airborne droplet nuclei, which carry respiratory secretions smaller than 5 microns can remain suspended in the air for extended period and can cause infections to people who are standing even more than 10 feet away. The example of airborne droplet nuclei infections are TB, measles, chickenpox and SARS.
  • Patients with these diseases need to be placed in an isolation room. And, all those people who are looking after these patients must use a safe N95 mask.
  • In normal house with open windows, there is a constant exchange of air, which prevents spread of infections, but in rooms with air conditioners (ACs) with no air exchange, infections can spread from one person to another.
  • When sitting in an air conditioned atmosphere, the setting of the AC should be such that the same air is not circulated and fresh air is allowed to exchange. Split ACs, therefore, are more dangerous than the window ACs.
  • In an office with split AC, if one employee is suffering from any of the droplet nuclei disease, he/she can transmit infection to others. Therefore, patients with confirmed TB, measles, chickenpox and SARS should not be allowed to work in offices with split ACs.

Walking Tips

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Walking Tips

  • Walking requires no special clothes or equipment, and it’s free.
  • Make walking fun by going to places you enjoy.
  • Walk with someone else to enjoy a chat, or listen to your favorite music, but also listen to the sounds around you.
  • Keep safety in mind as you plan when and where to walk.
  • Carry a phone and ID with you.
  • Inform someone about your walking time and route.
  • If it’s dark outside when you go for a walk, wear a reflective vest or brightly colored clothing.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings.

Definition of Health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Definition of Health

Health is not mere absence of disease; it is a state of physical, mental, social, spiritual, environmental and financial wellbeing. All aspects of health are not defined in allopathy.

During MBBS, medical students are taught more about the physical health. Social and mental health are covered only in few lectures. Community health is a separate subject but never given its due importance. Spiritual health is not defined at all and financial health is hardly covered.

Yet, in day-to-day practice it is the social, financial, spiritual and community health, which are most important during patient-doctor communication. It is incorporated in the four basic purposes: dharma, artha, kama and moksha.

Dharma and artha form the basis of karma, which means righteous earning. You are what your deep rooted desires are. Most of the diseases can be traced to a particular emotion, whether positive or negative. Anger and jealousy are related with heart attack, fear with blood pressure, greed and possessiveness with heart failure. If the mind is not healthy, one cannot be free of diseases.

The best description of health comes from Ayurveda. In Sanskrit, health means swasthya, or establishment in the self. Being established in the self means a union of mind, body and soul. Most symbols of health are established around a shaft with two snakes and two wings. The shaft represents the body, two snakes represent the duality of mind and the two wings represent the freedom of soul.

Sushrut Samhita in Chapter 15 Shloka 10 defines the Ayurvedic person as under:

Samadosha, samagnischa,

Samadhatumalkriyah,

Prasannatmendriyamanah,

Swastha iti abhidhiyate.

From an Ayurvedic point of view, for a person to be healthy, he/she must have balanced doshas, balanced agni, balanced dhatus, normal functioning of malkriyas and mind, body, spirit and indriyas full of bliss and happiness.

Human body is made up of structures (Kapha), which have two basic functions to perform; metabolism (pitta) and movement (vata). Vata, pitta and kapha are the three doshas in Ayurveda. Samana dosha signifies balance of structures, metabolism and movement functions in the body. Agni in Ayurveda is considered to be in balance when a person has normal tejas and a good appetite.In Ayurveda,there are seven dhatus: rasa, rakta, mamsa, medha, asthi, majja, shukra.They are required to be in balance. They are equivalent to various tissues in the human body.

Ayurveda necessitates proper functioning of natural urges like urination, stool, sweating and breathing and that is what balance in malakriya means.

Ayurveda says, for a person to be healthy, he/she has to be mentally and spiritually healthy, which will only happen when his or her indriyas are cheerful, full of bliss and devoid of any negativities. For indriyas to be in balance, one has to learn to control over the lust cum desires, greed and ego. This can be done by learning regular pranayama, learning the do’s and don’ts in life, living in a disciplined atmosphere and learn to live in the present.

Regular pranayama takes one from the sympathetic to the parasympathetic mode, balances the mind and thoughts and helps get rid of negative thoughts from the mind. For living a disabled life, one can follow the yama and niyama of yoga sutras of Patanjali or do’s and don’ts taught by various religious gurus, leaders and principles of naturopathy. Living in the present means conscious or meditative living. This involves either learning meditation 20 min twice a day or learning subtle mental exercises like mind-body relaxation, yogic shavasana, self-hypnotic exercises, etc.

According to Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a person who eats thrice a day is a rogi, twice a day is a bhogi and once a day is yogi. The take home message is: To live more one has to eat less.

Swar yoga defines the importance of respiration and longevity. According to this yoga shastra, everybody has a fixed number of breaths to be taken during the life span.

Lesser the number a person takes in a minute, more is the life. It also forms the basis of pranayama which is nothing but longer and deeper breathing with reduced respiratory rate. To be healthy, one can remember to follow the principle of moderation and variety in diet and exercise, regular pranayama and meditation and positive thinking.

Ten Golden Rules for preventing CKD

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Ten Golden Rules for preventing CKD

Kidney diseases are silent killers. There are several easy ways to reduce the risk of developing kidney disease.

  1. Keep active: Keeping fit helps to reduce the blood pressure and therefore reduces the risk of chronic kidney Disease.
  2. Keep fasting sugar < 80 mg%: Nearly half of people who have diabetes develop kidney damage. Kidney damage due to diabetes can be reduced or prevented if detected early.
  3. Keep lower BP < 80 mm Hg: High blood pressure is a common cause of kidney damage. High blood pressure can cause kidney damage when associated with other factors such as diabetes, high cholesterol and cardiovascular diseases.
  4. Keep your abdominal circumference < 80 cm: Eat healthy and keep your weight in check. This can help prevent diabetes, heart disease and other conditions associated with chronic kidney disease. Reduce your salt intake. The recommended sodium intake is 5-6 grams of salt per day (about a teaspoon). Limit the intake of processed and restaurant food and avoid adding salt to your food.
  5. Drink adequate fluids: Drink 1.5 to 2 litres (3 to 4 pints) of water per day. Intake of adequate amount of fluid helps the kidneys clear sodium, urea and toxins from the body which leads to a significantly lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease. One should not advocate aggressive fluid loading, as it can have side effects. People who have already suffered a kidney stone must drink 2 to 3 litres of water a day to decrease the risk of forming a new stone.
  6. Do not smoke: It slows the flow of blood to the kidneys. Smoking tends to increase the risk of kidney cancer by about 50%.
  7. Do not take over-the-counter pain killers: Common drugs such non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are known to cause kidney damage if taken regularly.
  8. If you have a kidney disease, ask your doctor for ACE inhibitors.
  9. Know your eGFR = 140 – age x body weight (in kg)/72 × serum creatinine (x 0.85 if female)
  10. Keep your LDL levels < 80 mg%.

The Science behind Training and Development

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on The Science behind Training and Development

Training in any field requires gaining knowledge, skills and positive mental attitude towards the object of learning.

The knowledge is everything about what and why. In Yoga, it correlates with the Gyan (Gnana) Marg. The skill is all about how to do it and correlates with Karma Marg.

A positive mental attitude is linked to willingness to do any work or in other words, one’s Astha in that action. In Yoga, it is synonymous with Bhakti Marg.

In Bhagwad Gita, Lord Krishna talks about all the principles of management, including how to train and develop an individual.

The development teaches and increases one’s intelligence quotient (IQ), physical quotient (PQ), emotional quotient (EQ) and moral quotient (MQ).

OTC does not mean that these drugs can be taken without a doctors advice

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on OTC does not mean that these drugs can be taken without a doctors advice

An over-the-counter antacid is often used to relieve mild cases of heartburn or acid reflux. Though they are available without a doctor’s prescription, they should be taken only under a doctor’s advice. As per American Academy of Family Physicians:

  • There are different types of antacids, which work in different ways.
  • Always consult your doctor before taking an antacid.
  • To manage an ulcer, an antacid may need to be taken along with an antibiotic.
  • If one needs more calcium to help strengthen bones, one should take an antacid that contains calcium carbonate.
  • Antacids may have minor side effects such as nausea, headache, diarrhea or constipation in some patients.
  • Read the label carefully to make sure that one is not allergic to any of the ingredients.
  • People with kidney disease may not be able to take all sorts of antacids.
  • An antacid may interact with other medications.

Why are coconut and the kalash used in all poojas?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Why are coconut and the kalash used in all poojas?

‘If nature wanted you to drink coconut water in non-coastal areas it would not have grown coconuts in the coastal areas’ is a common naturopathic saying. Coconut water is the treatment for most humidity-related illnesses in coastal areas. It is sterile water and has been used in surgical practice as a sterile fluid. It is also used as a replacement for oral rehydration solution. Hence, because of its many uses, it is regarded as the ‘Tree of Life’.

Coconut is one of the most common offerings in a temple, weddings, and festivals. It is offered in all sacrificial fires whilst performing the Homa(fire rituals). The coconut is usually split and placed before the Lord and is later distributed as Prasadam. The fibrous outer covering of the dried coconut is removed except for a tuft on the top.

The marks on the coconut make it look like a human head. The splitting of a coconut symbolizes the conquest of the ego. The outer covering represents the body, the juice within, one’s inner tendencies (vasanas) and the white kernel, the mind. Be as firm as the outer shell of the coconut but at the same time be as soft like the inner fruit of the coconut.

Also, a coconut – Sriphala(fruit of the gods) – is the only fruit used to symbolize God while worshipping any deity. It is used in the making of a Purna-Kumbha (‘purna’ = full, ‘kumbha’ = pot or kalash), an independent object of worship. The earthen pot full of water and with fresh mango leaves and a coconut on top is placed in front of the main deity or by the side of the deity before starting any Pooja. The pot symbolizes Mother Earth; water, the life-giver; the leaves, life (air); and the coconut, divine consciousness (space). All religious rituals start with the worship of the kalash with coconut as symbol of Lord Ganesha. The coconut is also worshipped as symbol of the Godhead – the three eyes are symbolic of the eyes of Lord Shiva (Trayambaka – Rudra). Sage Vishwamitra grew the first coconut tree on this earth by the power of his tapa.

The hard shell inspires one to have tolerance and work hard for attaining success.

The coconut also symbolizes selfless service. Every part of the tree, whether it is the trunk, leaves, fruit, or coir,is used to make thatches, mats, tasty dishes, oil, soap, etc.

Coconut water is used in the preparation of many Ayurveda drugs. The kernel is used to gain strength and improve eyesight. Its water is nourishing. Coconut oil is used to nourish the hair. It has glucose, phosphorous and carbohydrates. Germs cannot penetrate its hard kernel. Ancient Indian healers burnt its outer shell to prepare tooth powder, eyebrow creams and ointments for burns. Coconut milk is made by grating the endocarp and mixing it with warm water. This produces a thick, white liquid called coconut milk which is extensively used in Asian cooking, for example, in curries. Water from the unripe coconut is drunk fresh as a refreshing drink.

Tender coconut water is used in the rituals of abhishek, since it is believed to bestow spiritual growth on the seeker.

On the auspicious occasion of Rakhi Purnima (Rakshabandhan), coconuts are thrown into the sea as offerings to Varuna, God of the Sea. In western India, this festival is called Nariyal Purnima (Coconut Full Moon).

The Chhandogya Upanishad by Swami Krishnananda (78) talks about another quality of the coconut that has a spiritual resonance: “The coconut that is raw sticks to the shell. That is the condition of the bound soul. Consciousness sticks to the shell of this body. But in the case of the liberated soul, it is inside the body, no doubt, but is not sticking to the body, even as the dry coconut is not touching the shell. It makes a sound inside if we shake it. It is detached from the shell, though it is there tentatively. Even so, consciousness is not confined to the body, even though it is inside.”

In the Chidakasha Gita by ParamahansaNityananda, the coconut tree is described as a state of meditation: “At another time all feeling comes to a standstill. Sometime the body becomes quite motionless like a coconut tree”.

Ganesha’s favorite food is made up of a sweet core of candied coconut pulp covered with a layer made of white flour. The insipid outer shell is said to represent the gross physical body, the sweet inside stands for the resplendent soul.

When the Asuras and the Devas churned the milky ocean, Lord Dhanwantri appeared bearing the pot of nectar, which blessed one with everlasting life. Thus, the kalasha also symbolizes immortality.

Keeping blood pressure in the safe zone

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Keeping blood pressure in the safe zone

By keeping your BP below 120/80, you can avoid a number of diseases, such as heart disease, kidney failure and erectile dysfunction. When lifestyle changes fail to provide benefit, doctors can provide medication.

  • Limit sodium intake. DASH diet keeps sodium to 2,300 mg per day (about one teaspoon of salt). Cutting it down to 1,500 is even better. The DASH diet can decrease your systolic blood pressure by 10 points or more.
  • Monitor your blood pressure at home. This can give you an instant idea on the benefits of diet and exercise and yield a more accurate picture of your blood pressure levels. This is important, in the sense that some people experience white coat hypertension, wherein the blood pressure rises higher than normal when measured at the doctor’s office.
  • Limit alcohol intake. Men can take 1 to 2 alcoholic drinks per day, defined as 1.5 ounces (1 shot glass) of 80–proof spirits, a 5–ounce serving of wine, or a 12–ounce serving of beer. Women may take no more than one drink a day.
  • Take more meds if required—but take the right ones.

(Healthbeat)

The Skill of Controlling Anger

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on The Skill of Controlling Anger

Cynicism is one of the major risk factors for causation of coronary artery disease (blockages in the channels supplying blood to the heart). And anger, jealousy and irritability form the triad responsible for this.

Anger is the enemy of peace, knowledge and devotion. According to Ayurveda, anger is a manifestation of Pitta (metabolism) imbalance and is a predisposing risk factor for causation of heart attack, paralysis, gall bladder stone, kidney stone, acidity, ulcer and cancer.

In Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krishna describes the pathway of anger leading to destruction in Chapter 2 Shloka 62 and 63. According to Lord Krishna, when a man’s desires are not fulfilled or expectations are not met, one becomes angry. And when one is under the effect of anger, he does all types of sinful activities. One loses the distinction between good and bad, loses one’s memory, the understanding becomes clouded, and the intellect gets perverted. Loss of intellect leads to animal-like behavior, and ultimately to destruction of oneself.

Angercan have several repercussions, which are injustice, rashness, persecution, jealousy, taking possession of others’ property, killing, using harsh words and cruelty. The degree of anger may vary from irritation, frowning, resentment, indignation, rage, fury and wrath.

Anger is not always bad. It is only when the anger is an outcome of greed or selfish motives, it is bad.

Righteous or spiritual anger is a type of anger caused with good intentions. This anger passes off the next moment as a wave subsides in the sea. The classical example of righteous anger is when you become angry in a situation where you see a person doing something wrong to check that person. The root cause of anger is ignorance, egoism, and passion (strong desires), with passion being the root cause. To control anger, therefore, passion should be controlled first.

In Vedic language, both anger and passion are Rajo-Vriti disorders and get exaggerated with any Rajas-increasing lifestyle. Living a life with fewer Rajas characteristics will reduce the chances of anger.

Rajas-increasing foods are eggs, fish, onion, garlic, fermented foods, etc. Indulging into modern fashion, night clubs, reading novels with stories of violence, living in the company of bad people, use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs are all Rajas-increasing lifestyles. A typical Rajasik person indulges in eating, drinking and procreating.

Controlling anger and passion involves effort. As a fish swims upstream against the current in a river to breathe, so does a person has to work against the disturbed thoughts. To balance and stabilize the mind, consuming ‘satvik’ foods like fresh food, vegetables, milk and barley bread will help.

Many exercises canhelp control anger. A few suggested ones are observing silence for 20 to 30 minutes in a day, walking regularly, practicing speaking kind words; doing regular meditation, practicing non-violent communication daily and learning to think differently.

During an episode of anger, one can try left nostril pranayama, a short deep breathing exercise, taking a walk, drinking cold or simple water or chanting AUM or I AM. With inspiration one chants “I” and with expiration “AM” reminding one who I AM. That I am the expression of pure spirit and my purpose of life is not to become angry. Remember, the person who gets angry will have high blood pressure. On whom you are angry may have no change in blood pressure.

One should realize that during anger, one loses the power of discrimination and suffers from intellectual impairment. Therefore, anger has to be controlled much before it becomes full blown. The initial stage of anger is irritability, and therefore, with the onset of irritability, one should try to control it at the earliest.

Never judge an individual with your own level of perception. You should realize that if a servant starts working with your level of expectations, he or she will not be working with you as a servant. Also make sure that you are not hungry at the time of feeling angry or irritable. Regular meals prevent development of anger.

Anger can be expressive or suppressive. Expressive anger presents with aggressive behavior and the outbursts of anger can cause social unhealthiness. It can cause sudden rise in upper blood pressure or cause rupture of a plaque in the artery supplying blood to the heart precipitating a heart attack.

Suppressive anger can lead to acidity, asthma, formation of plaques in the heart arteries, etc. In the long run, suppressed anger, if not expressed may end up with depression, despondency, guilt, etc.

Therefore anger should neither be passed on to others (expressive) nor taken within (suppressed or repressed). Anger, therefore, should be altered, neutralized, or modified. This can be done by temporarily holding it for some time and then taking timely action. Temporary holding can be achieved by using the above exercises. Remember both passion and anger are energies, which should be conserved and not wasted.

The mythological explanation of Shiva, the Neelkanth, is also the same. Neither throw the poison (anger), nor drink it but keep it in the throat for some time and take the right action after the anger manifestations are over.

From Vedic point of view, every thought arises from the silent potential web of energized information or consciousness. This thought from the mind is then analyzed by the intellect and then modified by the ego. At this stage it leads to an action. An action leadsto memory and memory leads to desire for the action again. If this desire is fulfilled, it leads to action again and then desire again. Repeated fulfillment of desires leads to habit formation, addictions and development of a particular personality. An unfulfilled desire leads to irritability and irritability leads to anger, which then can be expressive or suppressive.

The answer, therefore, lies in changing the perception at the level of thought or controlling desires and/or expectations.

Drinking coffee prevents Parkinson’s disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Drinking coffee prevents Parkinson’s disease

Nicotine present in tobacco has been used for its medicinal value for quite some time for diseases like Parkinson’s disease and ulcerative colitis. A study from University of Miami School of Medicine, USA revealed that people from families prone to Parkinson’s disease are less likely to develop the disease if they drink coffee on a regular basis.

Both coffee and nicotine have a link with dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical that decreases in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

It is possible that people who are going to have Parkinsons disease have lower levels of dopamine. Those with low levels of dopamine may be more likely to enjoy caffeine.

Parkinsons disease occurs when brain cells that produce dopamine die. This is a progressive disease and affects about 1% of people above 65 years of age. Symptoms include tremors, muscular rigidity and slow movements and can progress to paralysis. While there is no cure, some drugs may make symptoms better for a period of time.

Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Spiritual prescriptions learnt from patients

As doctors we are witness to human suffering. When we were young in medical college, we were quite disturbed seeing the sufferings of the people. But, in our practice, we have learnt many spiritual prescriptions from our patients. These have not only helped us heal our patients but also changed our perception to health and sickness.

I recall Swami Bodhanand, a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was once hospitalized under our care. When I asked him to give me a spiritual message, he said only two words “Detached Attachment”. He said, “As a doctor you should behave like a lotus leaf. It is wet as long as there is a drop of water on it, but once the drop is out, the leaf is as dry as if the water was never there.” The message was that “we should be attached to our patients as long as they are with us. The day they die, we should be completely detached from them or else we will not be able to treat other patients”.

I saw another spiritual guru through our Chief Anesthetist. The fee he paid me was a spiritual message “Suno Samjho Jano Karo – Hear Understand Wisdom and Do”. He said that hearing is different from listening, listening is different from wisdom and wisdom is different from doing. Unless you hear, understand what you have heard and implement, the learning has no value.

One of my Buddhist patients gave me a spiritual learning, which has helped me a lot in my routine clinical practice. He taught me the basic Buddhist message that there is suffering all over, there is a reason for every suffering and it is possible to maintain sufferings. This message fits into the main message of Hinduism and also the main teaching from Garud Purana.

In Hinduism, we know that the very fact that we are born in this life means that in our last life, we could not get liberation as Hinduism believes that after liberation you are not reborn. Not getting liberated in the last birth means that some sufferings were left in our life. The basic purpose of this birth, therefore, is to face sufferings. When the basic purpose of our birth is to face sufferings, then why suffer from these sufferings. Every time we suffer, we should thank God that he has reduced one more. The period in between two sufferings is called a happy period (Sukh). In fact that period is nothing but a period of rest given by God to us to prepare the body for next suffering. This, as a concept of counseling, helps my patients in managing most of their mental disturbances.

Not telling a patient that he is suffering from terminal cancer sometime works. One of my patient’s father, aged 83 years, was found to have extensive cancer of the prostate. Medically, we all gave him three months to live. My patient did not have the courage to tell his father or the family members that he (the father) had extensive cancer. He took me into confidence and played a game with the family. We gathered all the family members and told them that with the surgery, his cancer had been cured. A party was organized in the evening to celebrate the cure. The magic happened; he lived almost a symptom–free life for the next 9 years. I have tried this on many of my patients thereafter and it works. The probable explanation was loss of fear of death, a confidence in his doctor and faith in himself.

The way to live up to the age of hundred is to go on working in life. My great grandfather-in-law was 75 years old when I got married. That year, he gathered all family members from across the world and said that his purpose of life was over and, he would like a collective family photograph and like to quit the world. Nothing happened for a year and he did this again next year. The entire family from across the world gathered but he remained alive for another year. This went on for three years. Then, we played a spiritual trick on him and told everyone to convince him that he is going to live for 100 years as he has many more works of the family to be done. Every year, we gave him law students from within the family to be taught (he was a lawyer himself), or gave him the responsibility of finding a boy for some eligible girl in the family. We made him teach and search for suitable bride/bridegrooms for years together and he actually died at the age of 100 years. This is the beauty of positive attitude in life.

Predicting sudden cardiac death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Predicting sudden cardiac death

  • Normally people can walk a distance of 400-700 meters in 6 minutes.
  • A 6-minute walking distance of less than 300 meter is a simple and useful predictor of sudden cardiac death in a patient with mild to moderate heart failure.
  • Patients with interstitial lung disease who can cover less than 200 meters during 6 minute walk test are 4 times more likely to die than those who can walk greater distance.
  • People who can cover a distance of 200-300 meters need further evaluation.
  • A fall of SpO2 of more than 4% ending below 93% suggests significant desaturation.
  • An improvement of more than 70 meters or 10% in distance walked can make all the difference.
  • An improvement of 30 meters in any distance walked is the minimally important difference in any treatment.
  • Sudden cardiac death is linked to 15% of total urban mortality.
  • Risk factors for sudden cardiac death include abnormal lipid level, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, diabetes, obesity and family history of premature heart disease or heart attack.
  • Binge alcoholism can cause sudden cardiac death (6 or more drinks per day or five drinks in one session).
  • Risk of sudden cardiac arrest is transiently increased for up to 30 minutes after strenuous exercise.
  • If you are at low risk for having a heart problem, you do not need a regular treadmill test.

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Science behind regrets

In a US-based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
  2. I wish I had worked harder.
  3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
  5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfilment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor, said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A Homoeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homoeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show-off.

Even Children Can Have Acidity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Even Children Can Have Acidity

Children with continuing recurrence of cough and croup could probably be suffering from stomach acid reflux problems.

Croup or ‘Kali Khansi’, as it is called in local parlance, is recognized by a loud cough that often sounds like the barking of a seal. It can cause rapid or difficult breathing, and sometimes wheezing. Croup is believed to be caused by a virus, but reflux acidity has been suggested as a possible trigger.

In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach acid causes swelling and inflammation of the larynx, thus narrowing the airway. It can incite more swelling with any viral or respiratory infection.

It is important to identify children with GERD in order to help treat and improve recurring croup. It is unusual that a child would have three or more bouts of croup over a short period of time. These children need to be evaluated.

The same is true for adults also. Patients with non-responding asthma should be investigated for underlying acidity as the cause of acute asthma.