Gasping, gurgling, moaning or any other noisy breathing increases the chances for survival when someone is suffering sudden cardiac arrest.

Gasping is a sign that there’s still blood flow to the brain, and the person can be saved even though the heart has stopped.

The first aid involves starting compressing the chest, 100 times a minute.

A Phoenix study of 1,218 cases published in Circulation has shown better survival when abnormal breathing, gasping, was noted.

After gasping one may have 4-5 minutes before the breathing stops and these 4-5 minutes are crucial.

Gasping is present in 40% of the cases of sudden cardiac arrest. After timely CPR, as many as 39 percent of the gaspers will survive as compared to 9.4 percent of the non-gaspers. If no CPR is done, 21.1 percent for gaspers and 6.7 percent of non-gaspers survive.