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Dr K K Aggarwal

Alternative medicine and healing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Alternative medicine and healing

The universe is made of five elements, namely air, space, fire, water and earth. Any imbalance of these five elements leads to natural disasters. The science which deals with balancing these five elements and using them as a therapeutic modality is Naturopathy. The five elements also constitute human body. These five elements in the body form three humors i.e. movement, metabolism and structure, which define the Vata, Pitta and Kapha functions of Ayurveda.

A vitiation of any of the three humors leads to diseases and balancing these three humours makes the basis of Ayurvedic healing.

These three humours define seven Dhatus – Rasa, Rakta, Mamsa, Medha, Asthi, Majja and Shukra (plasma, blood, muscles, adipose tissues, bone, bone marrow and vital force including semen and ova).

The science which deals with balance of these dhatus is again Ayurveda.

These seven dhatus make organs, organs have receptors. Various drugs act at these receptors. This forms the basis of the modern allopathic medicine. The science which deals with these organs is modern science or allopathy.

When the drugs act as receptors, the drugs can be allopathic, homeopathic tincture or Ayurvedic. All of them differ in their preparations. Ayurvedic drugs are from natural sources potentised by grinding and homeopathic drugs are alcohol extracts of various molecules, which may be plant in origin or biochemical in origin.

Homeopathic tinctures can also be titrated or potentised or triturated.

The drug molecules can be converted into more potentised form as mentioned above by grinding in Ayurveda, trituration in homeopathy and by using nanotechnology in modern medicine.

Matter can also be converted into non–matter, a technique used in classical homeopathy and bhasma therapy in Ayurveda. A similar technology is used for vaccine therapy in modern medicine.

In homeopathy, liquid and solid molecules are triturated or potentised repeatedly in succession till no more matter is traceable in the original solution. Once the matter is converted into non–matter it becomes a classical potentised homeopathy medicine. The same exercise is done by repeatedly heating; matter can be converted into potentised non–matter, a technique well–defined in Ayurveda.

In science of physics, matter is made of atoms; atoms break down into proton, neutron and electron. They breakdown into photons and they into quantum and quantum into energy and energy into waves and these waves arise out of nothing called consciousness or the potential.’

The science, which deals with balancing these waves and shunya or consciousness, is the science of yogic meditation.

The science, which deals with balancing at the level of quantum and energy, is the science of classical homeopathy and bhasma Ayurveda.

All the above make it very clear that most of these pathies act at different levels and therefore there is a ground for their merger.

The time has come for all the pathies to work together and carry out research together so that benefits of each can be availed of in treating the patients.

Alternative Therapies Lower BP

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Alternative Therapies Lower BP

A group of experts has reviewed all the existing studies and concluded that there are indeed alternative treatments for lowering blood pressure – with aerobic exercise leading the pack as far as strong evidence goes.

Other alternative treatments – namely isometric handgrip and dynamic resistance exercises and guided breathing –– also got high grades when it came to reducing high blood pressure in some patients, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online in the journal Hypertension.

“The evidence is not as strong for transcendental meditation and acupuncture, but they may help as well,” said co–senior author Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University School of Medicine in Columbus.

For the report, an expert panel headed by the University of Michigan’s Robert D. Brook, MD, reviewed 1,000 studies published from 2006 to 2011. They divided the studies into three major classes of alternative treatments: behavioral therapies, noninvasive procedures and devices, and exercise. The panel did not review dietary and herbal treatments. Based on the level of evidence, they gave each an “A,” “B,” or “C” recommendation –– with “A” being the highest –– for implementation into clinical practice.

The panel found:

  • Exercise–based regimens did the best overall, with dynamic aerobic exercises getting an “A” class of recommendation, with a level of evidence of I, the highest possible.
  • Dynamic resistance exercises got a “B” and isometric handgrip exercises got a “C” grade, with levels of evidence of IIA and IIB, respectively.
  • Still, 4 weeks of isometric hand grip exercises resulted in some of the most impressive improvements in several studies –– a 10% drop in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, isometric exercise should be avoided among people with severely uncontrolled hypertension (180/110 mm Hg or higher).
  • As for noninvasive procedures or devices, device–guided breathing got a “B” with a level of evidence of II. Device–guided slow breathing proved most effective in lowering blood pressure when performed for 15–minute sessions three to four times a week. Acupuncture also got a “B,” but its level of evidence was III, meaning no benefit.
  • Among behavioral techniques, transcendental meditation and biofeedback both received “B” grades, with IIBs for levels of evidence. Yoga got a C, with level of evidence of III, or no benefit, as did other meditation techniques.
  • The alternative approaches that work reduce systolic blood pressure by only 2 to 10 mm Hg; whereas standard doses of a blood pressure–lowering drug reduce systolic blood pressure by about 10 to 15 mm Hg.
  • Alternative approaches are best for patients with blood pressure levels over 120/80 mm Hg who can’t tolerate or don’t respond well to standard medications.

Alternative medicine and healing

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Alternative medicine and healing

The universe is made of five elements, namely air, space, fire, water and earth. Any imbalance of these five elements leads to natural disasters. The science which deals with balancing these five elements and using them as a therapeutic modality is Naturopathy. The five elements also constitute human body. These five elements in the body form three humors i.e. movement, metabolism and structure, which define the Vata, Pitta and Kapha functions of Ayurveda.

A vitiation of any of the three humors leads to diseases and balancing these three humours makes the basis of Ayurvedic healing.

These three humours define seven Dhatus – Rasa, Rakta, Mamsa, Medha, Asthi, Majja and Shukra (plasma, blood, muscles, adipose tissues, bone, bone marrow and vital force including semen and ova).

The science which deals with balance of these dhatus is again Ayurveda.

These seven dhatus make organs, organs have receptors. Various drugs act at these receptors. This forms the basis of the modern allopathic medicine. The science which deals with these organs is modern science or allopathy.

When the drugs act as receptors, the drugs can be allopathic, homeopathic tincture or Ayurvedic. All of them differ in their preparations. Ayurvedic drugs are from natural sources potentised by grinding and homeopathic drugs are alcohol extracts of various molecules, which may be plant in origin or biochemical in origin.

Homeopathic tinctures can also be titrated or potentised or triturated.

The drug molecules can be converted into more potentised form as mentioned above by grinding in Ayurveda, trituration in homeopathy and by using nanotechnology in modern medicine.

Matter can also be converted into non–matter, a technique used in classical homeopathy and bhasma therapy in Ayurveda. A similar technology is used for vaccine therapy in modern medicine.

In homeopathy, liquid and solid molecules are triturated or potentised repeatedly in succession till no more matter is traceable in the original solution. Once the matter is converted into non–matter it becomes a classical potentised homeopathy medicine. The same exercise is done by repeatedly heating; matter can be converted into potentised non–matter, a technique well–defined in Ayurveda.

In science of physics, matter is made of atoms; atoms break down into proton, neutron and electron. They breakdown into photons and they into quantum and quantum into energy and energy into waves and these waves arise out of nothing called consciousness or the potential.’

The science, which deals with balancing these waves and shunya or consciousness, is the science of yogic meditation.

The science, which deals with balancing at the level of quantum and energy, is the science of classical homeopathy and bhasma Ayurveda.

All the above make it very clear that most of these pathies act at different levels and therefore there is a ground for their merger.

The time has come for all the pathies to work together and carry out research together so that benefits of each can be availed of in treating the patients.

The universe is made of five elements, namely air, space, fire, water and earth. Any imbalance of these five elements leads to natural disasters. The science which deals with balancing these five elements and using them as a therapeutic modality is Naturopathy. The five elements also constitute human body. These five elements in the body form three humors i.e. movement, metabolism and structure, which define the Vata, Pitta and Kapha functions of Ayurveda.

A vitiation of any of the three humors leads to diseases and balancing these three humours makes the basis of Ayurvedic healing.

These three humours define seven Dhatus – Rasa, Rakta, Mamsa, Medha, Asthi, Majja and Shukra (plasma, blood, muscles, adipose tissues, bone, bone marrow and vital force including semen and ova).

The science which deals with balance of these dhatus is again Ayurveda.

These seven dhatus make organs, organs have receptors. Various drugs act at these receptors. This forms the basis of the modern allopathic medicine. The science which deals with these organs is modern science or allopathy.

When the drugs act as receptors, the drugs can be allopathic, homeopathic tincture or Ayurvedic. All of them differ in their preparations. Ayurvedic drugs are from natural sources potentised by grinding and homeopathic drugs are alcohol extracts of various molecules, which may be plant in origin or biochemical in origin.

Homeopathic tinctures can also be titrated or potentised or triturated.

The drug molecules can be converted into more potentised form as mentioned above by grinding in Ayurveda, trituration in homeopathy and by using nanotechnology in modern medicine.

Matter can also be converted into non–matter, a technique used in classical homeopathy and bhasma therapy in Ayurveda. A similar technology is used for vaccine therapy in modern medicine.

In homeopathy, liquid and solid molecules are triturated or potentised repeatedly in succession till no more matter is traceable in the original solution. Once the matter is converted into non–matter it becomes a classical potentised homeopathy medicine. The same exercise is done by repeatedly heating; matter can be converted into potentised non–matter, a technique well–defined in Ayurveda.

In science of physics, matter is made of atoms; atoms break down into proton, neutron and electron. They breakdown into photons and they into quantum and quantum into energy and energy into waves and these waves arise out of nothing called consciousness or the potential.’

The science, which deals with balancing these waves and shunya or consciousness, is the science of yogic meditation.

The science, which deals with balancing at the level of quantum and energy, is the science of classical homeopathy and bhasma Ayurveda.

All the above make it very clear that most of these pathies act at different levels and therefore there is a ground for their merger.

The time has come for all the pathies to work together and carry out research together so that benefits of each can be availed of in treating the patients.