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Dr K K Aggarwal

How to Be Happy and Healthy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Somebody once asked Lord Buddha, “After meditating for years, I have not been able to gain anything.” Then Lord Buddha asked, “Did you lose anything?” The disciple said, “Yes, I lost my anger, desires, expectations and ego.” Buddha smiled and said, “That is what your gain is by meditating.” To be happy, one must learn to let go the following: • Let go of your desires. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, Lord Shiva firstly let go of the Bull, which represents the sexual desires. In Hanuman ki Lanka yatra, desires are represented by Samhiki, a creature who used to catch birds by their shadow. Hanuman killed the desires. So, it is possible to kill your desires. Again in Ramayana, desires are linked to Rajsik mind and in mythology, Meghnath represents the Rajsik mind. Meghnath was killed by Lakshman, the determined mind. Therefore, one should let go of the desires by killing them by focused concentration of the mind on the desires. • Let go of your expectations. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, the second thing which Lord Shiva discarded was the moon, which in mythology symbolizes letting go of expectations. • Let go of your ego. In mythology, ego represents Kansa in Krishna era and Ravana in Rama era. Both were killed by Krishna and Rama respectively, who symbolize the consciousness. Ego can never be killed by the mind and can only be killed by the consciousness (conscious-based decisions). Ego is also represented by Sheshnaag and we have Lord Shiva and Lord Vishnu both having a Sheshnaag each with a mouth downwards indicating the importance of controlling one’s ego. Also remember never to hurt somebody’s ego. Hurting somebody’s ego in terms of allegations of sexual misconduct, financial corruption or abusing one’s caste is never forgotten and carries serious implications. In Hanuman Ki Lanka Yatra, ego is represented by Sursa; Hanuman managed her by humility and not by counter ego. In Naag Panchami also, we worship Naag, the ego, by folded hands and by offering milk. • Let go of your inaction. One should learn to live in the present. In Hanuman Ki Lanka Yatra, Hanuman first meets Menak Mountain, which indicates destination to rest. One should never do that and wilfully divert his or her mind towards action. • Let go of your attachments. Let go of your attachments to your close relatives and the worldly desires. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, Lord Shiva first leaves Bull (desires), moon (expectations), sheshnaag (ego) and then he gives up Ganesha and worldly desires (five elements). In mythology, this is practiced as detached attachment and in Bhagavad Gita is equated to Lotus. In Islam, detached attachment is practiced in the form of Bakra Eid. • Let go of your habit of criticizing, complaining and condemning people. One should always practice non-violent communication and speak which is truth, necessary and kind. One should not criticize, condemn or complain about people, situation and events. Wayne Dyer said, “The highest form of ignorance is when you reject something you do not know anything about.” • Most of us often condemn people without knowing their capabilities and label them as unmatchable to us. One should also let go habit of gossiping as it is a form of violent communication. • Let go of your habit of blaming others: One should learn to take the responsibilities and people believe in team work. Good leader is the one who learns to be responsible in life. • Let go of your need to be always right: It is a form of ego. Remember, in arguments either you can win arguments or relationships. Always try to win relationship and not arguments. • Let go of your need to control situations, events and people: Learn to accept people as they are. The world is won by those who let this habit go. • Let go of your habit and the need to impress others: This is also a type of ego where we always seek appreciation. • Give up your belief that you cannot do it: Remember ‘IMPOSSIBLE’ is ‘I M POSSIBLE’. A belief is not an idea held by the mind but it is an idea that holds the mind. (Elli Roselle). • Give up your resistance to change: Remember change is the only constant which will happen and always welcome it. Joseph Campbell once said that one should follow one’s bliss and will open doors to your where there are only walls. • Let go of your fear and all negative thoughts: Remember, the mind is a superb instrument if used rightly. It becomes very destructive if used badly. (Eckhart Tolle). • Let go of your habit of giving excuses. Let go of always being in the past.

Rome was not built in a day

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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With ‘Abhyas’ or constant practice, one can conquer all the obstacles in life. The sutra “Rome was not built in a day” has a deep spiritual meaning. In the path for self–realization, regular practice is the principle behind all paths: Bhakti, Karma or the Gnana marg. Persistence is the key in any spiritual attainment.

Regular hard work can also change one’s past bad karmic actions. All karmas irrespective of their nature should be converted into good karmas. This can be better understood by the following example. While painting a red colored wall with green paint with the intention to make it green, it first gets converted into yellow color. But repeated painting with green will ultimately make it green.

The red color here can be compared to bad past karmas and green color to good present karmas. By doing positive activities time and again, one can dissolve the impressions of the bad actions done in the past. To start with, there may be a reaction from the others (which is equivalent to the yellow color in the above example) but if the person does not lose his confidence at that moment and continues with his good present karmas, he will ultimately end up in changing his bad past converting it into a good present and a better future. This requires continuous and repeated practice.

Self–realization and meditation are difficult processes. They involve attaining a thoughtless state, in other words, a state of experiencing the silence. All the paths for self realization are difficult, but with regular practice, one can achieve it without any problem. The path of Bhakti is often considered the path of choice for the majority of people as it is the easiest path to follow. The path of Bhakti involves a triad of “duty, devotion and discipline”. But any duty, devotion or discipline done only for a short time will not end in success, unless it is practiced over a longer period of time.

A classical example can be seen in Islam. Ramadan is a classical example of hard work leading to an atmosphere of brotherhood, love, compassion and truthfulness with significant reduction in negativity amongst the community. For one month, all the Muslims participate in a self-training program to reduce negativity and build positivity in their lives. During this month they are prohibited from indulging in sexual activities, entering into marriage ceremonies, and are encouraged to make endeavors towards self realization. The classical discipline to be maintained is fasting. Fasting here does not mean only fasting food or water alone. It also means controlling negative thinking, negative speech, and indulging in any negative action.

The Bhagavad Gita has described the five gateways to hell as attachment, desire, anger, greed and ego. Controlling them requires practice. A month of observance of controlling one’s five senses and not indulging in the five gateways of hell trains one enough to make these parameters a part of one’s life. The positive attitude practiced over one month tends to stitch it in one’s consciousness, and ultimately in a majority, becomes a part of one’s life.

There is a similar practice in Hindu religion during “Navratras”, but unfortunately, not all people observe this as dedicatedly as the Muslims.

Apart from the internal journey to self–realization, hard work plays a role even in day–to–day outer journeys be it married life, family life, social life or office life.

Hard work is the key to success, provided one controls the above five gateways to hell and practices the triad of non–expectation, detachment and being non–judgmental. Attaching oneself with actions but detaching from the results is the key to both internal as well as external success.




Can’t avoid anger: Take aspirin

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Emotionally stressful events, and more specifically, anger, immediately precede and appear to trigger the onset of acute heart attack. Episodes of anger are capable of triggering the onset of acute heart attack and aspirin can reduce this risk. People who cannot control their anger should ask their doctors to consider taking aspirin.

The Onset Anger Scale identified 39 patients with episodes of anger in the 2 hours before the onset of heart attack. The relative risk of heart attack in the 2 hours after an episode of anger was 23. Regular users of aspirin had a significantly lower relative risk (1.4) than nonusers (2.9). Anger in response to stress is also of particular importance for the development of premature heart attack in young men. An episode of anger may also trigger an acute heart attack in the next 2 hours.

Anger can be a trigger for Heart Attack or Stroke

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A flash of anger may precipitate heart attack or stroke in susceptible individuals within two hours of anger episode as per a systematic review showed by Murray Mittleman, Dr PH, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues in the European Heart Journal.

The relative risks estimated in this meta–analysis indicate that there is a higher risk of cardiovascular events after outbursts of anger among individuals at risk of a cardiovascular event, but because each episode may be infrequent and the effect period is transient, the net absolute impact on disease burden is extremely low. However, with increasing frequency of anger episodes, these transient effects may accumulate, leading to a larger clinical impact.

In pooled results of four of the studies, the risk of MI or acute coronary syndrome was 4.74–fold higher in the hours after an outburst. One study evaluated intracranial hemorrhage and showed that the risk was higher in the hour after a bout of anger.

Mediated through increases in circulating catecholamines, increased myocardial oxygen demand, coronary vasospasm, and increased platelet aggregability, anger can cause transient ischemia, disruption of vulnerable plaques, and increased thrombotic potential.

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized by living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

  1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.
  2. Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.
  3. Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.
  4. Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that intellect (Indra) for its development requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).
  5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).
  6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.
  7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat the unbalanced food.
  8. Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.
  9. Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.
  10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.
  11. Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill that animal tendency within ourselves. For example, during exams, you need to kill your goat behavior, which is known to possess excessive sexual desires. You may need to control them throughout the year but during exams you need to kill them. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

Anger can be a trigger for Heart Attack or Strok

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A flash of anger may precipitate heart attack or stroke in susceptible individuals within two hours of anger episode as per a systematic review showed by Murray Mittleman, Dr PH, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues in the European Heart Journal.

The relative risks estimated in this meta–analysis indicate that there is a higher risk of cardiovascular events after outbursts of anger among individuals at risk of a cardiovascular event, but because each episode may be infrequent and the effect period is transient, the net absolute impact on disease burden is extremely low. However, with increasing frequency of anger episodes, these transient effects may accumulate, leading to a larger clinical impact.

In pooled results of four of the studies, the risk of MI or acute coronary syndrome was 4.74–fold higher in the hours after an outburst. One study evaluated intracranial hemorrhage and showed that the risk was higher in the hour after a bout of anger.

Mediated through increases in circulating catecholamines, increased myocardial oxygen demand, coronary vasospasm, and increased platelet aggregability, anger can cause transient ischemia, disruption of vulnerable plaques, and increased thrombotic potential.

Once somebody asked Lord Buddha, “after meditating for years, I have not been able to gain anything.” Then Lord Buddha asked, “Did you lose anything?” and the disciple said, “yes, I lost my anger, desires, expectations and ego.” Buddha smiled and said, “That is what your gain is by meditating.”

To be happy, one must learn to let go the following:

1.      One should let go the desires. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, Lord Shiva firstly let go the Bull which represents the sexual desires. In Hanuman ki Lanka yatra, desires are represented by Samhiki which was a creature who used to catch birds by their shadow. Hanuman killed the desires. So, it is possible to kill your desires.

Again in Ramayana, desires are linked to Rajsic mind and in mythology, Meghnath represents the Rajsic mind. Meghnath was killed by Lakshman, the determined mind.

Therefore, one should let go the desires by killing them by focused concentration of the mind on the desires.

2.      Let go your expectations. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, the second thing which Lord Shiva discarded is moon which in mythology is symbolized by letting go of expectations.

3.      Let go your ego. In mythology, ego represents Kansa inKrishna era and Ravana in Rama era. Both were killed byKrishna and Rama respectively who symbolized the consciousness.

Ego can never be killed by the mind and only can be killed by the consciousness (conscious based decisions).

Ego is also represented by Sheshnaag and we have Lord Shiva and Lord Vishnu both having a Sheshnaag each with a mouth downwards indicating the importance of controlling one’s ego.

One should let go his or her ego but also remember never to hurt somebody’s ego. Hurting somebody’s ego in terms of allegations of sexual misconduct, financial corruption or abusing one’s caste is never forgotten and carries serious implications.

In Hanuman Ki Lanka Yatra, ego is represented by Sursa and Hanuman managed her by humility and not by counter ego. In Naag Panchami also, we worship Naag the ego by folded hands and by offering milk.

4.      Let go your inaction. One should learn to live in the present. In Hanuman Ki Lanka Yatra, Hanuman first meetsMenakMountain which indicates destination to rest. One  should never do that and willfully divert his or her mind towards action.

5.      Let go your attachments. Let go your attachments to your close relations and the worldly desires. In Amarnath Ki Yatra, Lord  Shiva first leaves Bully desires, moon (expectations), sheshnaag (ego) and then he gives up Ganesha and worldly desires (five elements). In mythology, this is practiced as detached attachment and in Bhagavad Gita is equated to Lotus. In Islam, detached attachment is practiced in the form of Bakra Eid.

6.   Let go your habit of criticizing, complaining and condemning people:  One should always practice non-violent communication and speak which is truth, necessary and kind. One should not criticize, condemn or complain about people, situation and events.

Wayne Dyer: The highest form of ignorance is when you reject something you do not know anything about.

Most of us often condemn people without knowing their capabilities and label them as unmatchable to us. One should also let go habit of gossiping as it is a form of violent communication.

7.  Let go your habit of blaming others – One should learn to take the responsibilities and people believe in team work. Good leader is the one who learns to be responsible in life.

8.  Let go your habit of need to be always right – It is a form of ego. Remember in arguments either you can win arguments or relationships. One should always try to win relationship and not arguments.

9.  Let go your need to control situation, event and people – Learn to accept people as they are. The world is won by those who let this habit go.

10.  Let go your habit and need to impress others – This is also a type of ego where we always want appreciation.

11.  Give up your belief that you cannot do it  – Remember ‘IMPOSSIBLE’ is ‘I M POSSIBLE’. A belief is not an idea held by the mind but it is a mind that holds the mind. (Elli Roselle).

12.  Give up your resistance to change –  Remember change is the only constant which will happen and always welcome it. Joseph Campbell once said that one should follow one’s bliss and will open doors to your where there are only walls.

13.  Let go your fear and let go all negative thoughts. Remember, the mind is a superb instrument if used rightly. It becomes very destructive if used badly. (Eckhant Tolle).

 14.  Let go your habit of excuses

 15.  Let go being in the past.