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Dr K K Aggarwal

Heart risks detected by age 7 in overweight kids

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Children at risk of future obesity should be examined for body mass index (BMI) rebound.

BMI rebound is the age at which BMI reaches its lowest point before increasing through later childhood, adolescence and adulthood.

An earlier BMI rebound age is associated with adverse risk factors for heart disease as measured at age 7: higher BMI, higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, higher serum insulin and leptin levels, higher left ventricular mass and left atrial size.

Early BMI rebound age for children is lower than 4.4 years for boys and 4.2 years for girls. Normal values are 4.4 to 6.6 years for boys and 4.2 to 5.7 years for girls.

All children who start gaining weight between 3-4 years should be classified as a high risk for future diabetes and heart disease.

Sunlight can reduce weight

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A new Northwestern Medicine study has reported that the timing, intensity and duration of exposure to light during the day are linked to your weight.

People who had most of their daily exposure to even moderately bright light in the morning had a significantly lower body mass index than those who had most of their light exposure later in the day.

“The earlier this light exposure occurred during the day, the lower the individuals’ body mass index,” said co–lead author Kathryn Reid, research associate professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “The later the hour of moderately bright light exposure, the higher a person’s BMI.”

The influence of morning light exposure on body weight was independent of an individual’s physical activity level, caloric intake, sleep timing, age or season. It accounted for about 20 percent of a person’s BMI.

“Light is the most potent agent to synchronize your internal body clock that regulates circadian rhythms, which in turn also regulate energy balance,” said study senior author Phyllis C. Zee, M.D. “The message is that you should get more bright light between 8 a.m. and noon.” About 20 to 30 minutes of morning light is enough to affect BMI.

Diabetes mainly linked to obesity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Type 2 diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with obesity. More than 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to obesity.

• There is a curvilinear relationship between BMI and the risk of type 2 diabetes.

• Lowest risk is associated with a BMI below 22 kg/m2

• At a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2, the relative risk for diabetes adjusted for age increases to 61. The risk may further increase by a sedentary lifestyle or decrease by exercise.

• Weight gain after age 18 years in women and after age 20 years in men increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.

• The Nurses’ Health Study compared women with stable weight (those who gained or lost <5 kg) after the age of 18 years to women who gained weight. Those who had gained 5.0 to 7.9 kg had a relative risk of diabetes of 1.9; this risk increased to 2.7 for women who gained 8.0 to 10.9 kg.

• Similar findings were noted in men in the Health Professionals Study. The excess risk for diabetes with even modest weight gain is substantial.

• Weight gain precedes the onset of diabetes. Among Pima Indians (a group with a particularly high incidence of type 2 diabetes), body weight gradually increased 30 kg (from 60 kg to 90 kg) in the years preceding the diagnosis of diabetes. Conversely, weight loss is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

• Insulin resistance with high insulin levels is characteristic of obesity and is present before the onset of high blood sugar levels.

• Obesity leads to impairment in glucose removal and increased insulin resistance, which result in hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia contributes to high lipid levels and high blood pressure.

Healthy obesity does not exist

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A recent research published online in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that individuals cannot be simultaneously overweight and physically fit. As BMI rose, so did the blood pressure, waist circumference and insulin resistance. As BMI increased, levels of HDL cholesterol, thought to protect against heart attack and stroke, decreased.

While participants who were either overweight or obese “may not yet have reached the points that define metabolic

Check your BMI to know your risk of future heart attack

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you are less than 40 years of age, male, with a strong family history of diabetes, blood pressure or heart disease, have a normal weight as judged by body mass index (BMI) but have a pot belly, or have gained more than 10 kg since the age 18, do not ignore this and go to your cardiologist to reduce your chances of a future heart attack.

A BMI of 20 to 23 kg/m2 is associated with little or no increased risk unless visceral fat is high, or the subject has gained more than 10 kg since 18 years.

1. Subjects with a BMI of 23 to 30 kg/m2 may be described as having low risk, while those with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 are at moderate risk. 2. Subjects with a BMI of 35 to 40 kg/m2 are at high risk, and those with a BMI above 40 kg/m2 are at very high risk from their obesity. 3. At any given level of BMI, the risk to health is increased by more abdominal fat (increased weight to hip ratio, WHR), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, age less than 40 years, male sex, and a strong family history of diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.

The body mass index (BMI) is the most practical way to evaluate the degree of obesity. It is calculated from the height and weight as follows:

BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ square of stature (height, in meters)

Overweight is defined as a BMI between 23 and 30 kg/m2 and obesity as a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2.

Waist circumference a better indicator of mortality

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A high body mass index (BMI) appears to be protective in certain populations. Abdominal obesity –– measured using waist circumference –– was a better predictor of 5–year mortality among French survivors of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) than was BMI, according to a study presented by Tabassome Simon, MD, of Hôpital Saint Antoine in Paris in European Society of Cardiology meeting in 2013. Looking at BMI, there was an increased risk of dying for those with the lowest body mass (less than 22 kg/m2) and those with the highest (35 kg/m2 and higher), but not for those in the middle of those two groups, which included overweight and mildly obese individuals Within each category of BMI, however, increased waist circumference was associated with an elevated risk of dying within the follow–up period. After adjusting for BMI in a multivariate analysis, waist circumference in the upper quartile was associated with a 44% greater risk of dying through 5 years.

Check your BMI to know chances of future heart attack

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Check your BMI to know chances of future heart attack

If you are less than 40 years of age, male, with a strong family history of diabetes, blood pressure or heart disease, have a normal weight as judged by Body Mass Index (BMI) but have a pot belly, or have gained more than 10 kg since the age 18, do not ignore this. Go to your cardiologist to reduce your chances of a future heart attack.

A BMI of 20 to 23 kg/m2 is associated with little or no increased risk unless visceral fat is high, or the subject has gained more than 10 kg since 18 years.

  • Subjects with a BMI of 23 to 30 kg/m2 may be described as having low risk, while those with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 are at moderate risk.
  • Subjects with a BMI of 35 to 40 kg/m2 are at high risk, and those with a BMI above 40 kg/m2 are at very high risk from their obesity.
  • At any given level of BMI, the risk to health is increased by more abdominal fat (increased weight to hip ratio, WHR), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, age less than 40 years, male sex, and a strong family history of diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.

The body mass index (BMI) is the most practical way to evaluate the degree of obesity. It is calculated from the height and weight as follows:

BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ square of stature (height, in meters)

Overweight is defined as a BMI between 23 and 30 kg/m2 and obesity as a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2.

Check Your BMI To Know Chances Of Future Heart Attack

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Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Check Your BMI To Know Chances Of Future Heart Attack

If you are less than 40 years of age, male, with a strong family history of diabetes, blood pressure or heart disease, have a normal weight as judged by Body Mass Index (BMI) but have a pot belly, or have gained more than 10 kg since the age 18, do not ignore and go to your cardiologist to reduce your chances of a future heart attack.

A BMI of 20 to 23 kg/m2 is associated with little or no increased risk unless visceral fat is high, or the subject has gained more than 10 kg since 18 years.

Subjects with a BMI of 23 to 30 kg/m2 may be described as having low risk, while those with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 are at moderate risk.
Subjects with a BMI of 35 to 40 kg/m2 are at high risk, and those with a BMI above 40 kg/m2 are at very high risk from their obesity.
At any given level of BMI, the risk to health is increased by more abdominal fat (increased weight to hip ratio, WHR), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, age less than 40 years, male sex, and a strong family history of diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease.

The body mass index (BMI) is the most practical way to evaluate the degree of obesity. It is calculated from the height and weight as follows:

BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ square of stature (height, in meters)

Overweight is defined as a BMI between 23 and 30 kg/m2 and obesity as a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2.

November Diabetes Awareness Month: 14th November World Diabetes Day

Diabetes mainly linked to obesity

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with obesity.

More than 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to obesity.

1. There is a curvilinear relationship between BMI and the risk of type 2 diabetes.

2. Lowest risk is associated with a BMI below 22 kg/m2.

3. At a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2, the relative risk for diabetes adjusted for age increases to 61. The risk may further increase by a sedentary lifestyle or decrease by exercise.

4.  Weight gain after age 18 years in women and after age 20 years in men increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.

5. The Nurses’ Health Study, compared women with stable weight (those who gained or lost <5 kg) after the age of 18 years to women who gained weight. Those who had gained 5.0 to 7.9 kg had a relative risk of diabetes of 1.9; this risk increased to 2.7 for women who gained 8.0 to 10.9 kg.

6.Similar findings were noted in men in the Health Professionals Study. The excess risk for diabetes with even modest weight gain is substantial.

7.  Weight gain precedes the onset of diabetes. Among Pima Indians (a group with a particularly high incidence of type 2 diabetes), body weight gradually increased 30 kg (from 60 kg to 90 kg) in the years preceding the diagnosis of diabetes. Conversely, weight loss is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

8. Insulin resistance with high insulin levels is characteristic of obesity and is present before the onset of high blood sugar levels.

9. Obesity leads to impairment in glucose removal and increased insulin resistance, which result in hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia contribute to high lipid levels and high blood pressure.