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Dr K K Aggarwal

More about Debts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hindu scriptures have talked three types of rin (debts): Dev rin, Pitra rin and Rishi rin.God or the devtas gave us the consciousness, parents gave us our body and teachers gave us the knowledge or intellect.In Vedic language, our body is a mix of mind, body and soul which can be equated to three rins of mind (teachers), body (parents) and soul (Rishi & Gods). In computer language, this can be equated to operational software (God), application software (teachers) and computer hardware (parents).

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

The three types of Debts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Hindu scriptures have talked about three types of Hrin (debts): Dev Hrin, Pitra Hrin and Rishi Hrin.

God or the devtas gave us the consciousness, parents gave us our body and teachers gave us the knowledge or intellect. In Vedic language, our body is a mix of mind, body and soul, which can be equated to three Hrins of mind (teachers), body (parents) and soul (Rishi & Gods). In computer language, this can be equated to operational software (God), application software (teachers) and computer hardware (parents).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

How to Finish Your Pending Work?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • This involves principles of time management and some Vedic principles.
  • The first thing to do is to make a checklist of all the pending work by writing it down and re–categorizing them depending upon the urgency and importance.
  • Pending work can be classified under following four sections:
    • Urgent and important: Should be done immediately.
    • Important but not urgent: Should be scheduled as per the time available
    • Not important and not urgent: One should learn to say no and dump it
    • Urgent but not important: This work should be delegated to others.
  • Urgency of the work is decided by the deadlines available.
  • The importance of the work is decided by directing the result of the work to the mind, body or the soul. One should see whether the result of the work gives pleasure to the body, mind or the soul. The one which is giving pleasure to the soul will be free of fear or guilt.
  • When choosing files between simple or difficult, choose the difficult first so that you do not carry them back home in the mind. In terms of importance, difficult files are more important than simple files.
  • When choosing right versus convenient action, give priority to the right action and not the convenient action.
  • Delegation of work – team work is very important.
  • When deadlines are available, it is always better not to keep the work just near the deadlines.
  • Anticipate delay and keep time for unforeseen movements.
  • Work is work and not something personal.
  • Always remember the spiritual principle that you get what you deserve and not what you desire. So never get linked to the results of your actions.
  • Yoga, pranayama, afternoon naps and meditation help to prioritize your work.
  • Follow the principles of creativity and learn to give breaks in between the work so that the mind is relaxed and can take soul boosting decisions.
  • Remember, Yudhishthir never kept anything pending for tomorrow. In this way you can have a fearless, undisturbed sleep.
  • Organizing your pending list always helps.
  • Do not waste time on learning material on which you are already an expert.
  • Take advantage of down time. If you find free time in your routine, then convert it into a creative time so that you can plan strategies or do something new.
  • Always get up at the same time and never disturb your sleep time.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Why can the body be revived even after hours of death in hypothermia?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • It is a well–known phenomenon that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not successful if the body temperature is less than 35°C.
  • In hypothermic deaths, a person can be revived even after hours of cardiac arrest. Only when the body temperature is brought back to normal, will CPR be effective. This would mean that consciousness gets frozen and does not leave the body when the temperature is below 35°C. This forms the basis for induced hypothermia after death to revive the brain.
  • Modern science is silent about this mechanism but ancient Indian literature talks about it in great detail. As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1), the process of death takes time and is a sequential process.
  • First, the motor indriyas organs (Karma Indriyas) stop functioning followed by sensory indriya organs (Gnanaindriyas) followed by cessation of prana or respiration.
  • Once this happens, the frozen sensory organs, motor organs, manas (mind, body, memory and ego) and prana have to get dissolved in Tej and then leave the body, which means presence of Tej is the most important factor for consciousness to leave the body.
  • In modern science, Tej would be governed by the body temperature. That means if the body temperature is low, the motor and sensory indriyas and manas product (Vritti) will find no heat or Tej to dissolve and come out of the body.
  • Therefore, till the body temperature (Tej) is brought back to normal, the indriyas will cease to function but still be revivable.
  • This process may take up to 48 minutes in presence of Tej and there is no time limit if Tej is absent.
  • A clinically dead person with cardiac arrest therefore will have absent functioning of Manas organs, Sensory organs, mind, intellect, memory and ego with no respiration but yet revivable back to life.

Why in hypothermia the body can be revived even after hours of death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • It is a well–known phenomenon that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not successful if the body temperature is less than 35°C.
  • In hypothermic deaths, a person can be revived even after hours of cardiac arrest. Only once the body temperature is brought back to normal CPR will be effective.
  • That would mean that consciousness gets frozen and does not leave the body when the temperature is below 35°C.
  • This forms the basis for induced hypothermia after death to revive the brain.
  • Modern science is silent about this mechanism but the ancient Indian literature talks about it in great detail. As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1), the process of death takes time and is a sequential process.
  • First, the motor indriyas organs (Karma Indriyas) stop functioning followed by sensory indriya organs (Gnanaindriyas) followed by cessation of pana or respiration.
  • Once this happens, the frozen sensory organs, motor organs, manas (mind, body, memory and ego) and prana have to get dissolved in Tej and then leave the body, which means presence of Tej is the most important factor for consciousness to leave the body.
  • In modern science, Tej would be governed by the body temperature. That means if the body temperature is low, the motor and sensory indriyas and manas Product (Vritti) will find no heat or Tej to dissolve and come out of the body.
  • Therefore, till the body temperature (Tej) is brought back to normal, the indriyas will seize to function but still be revivable.
  • This process may take upto 48 minutes in presence of Tej and there is no time limit if Tej is absent.
  • A clinically dead person with cardiac arrest therefore will have absent functioning of Manas organs, Sensory organs, mind, intellect, memory and ego with no respiration but yet revivable back to life.

Stress is the reaction of the body and mind to the interpretation of a known situation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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You cannot be stressed unless you know the person, place or the situation. The same situation may or may not cause stress unless it is interpreted in such a way that it is uncomfortable to the person, and then it causes stress.

Management of stress, therefore, involves either removing the known situation or changing one’s interpretation or preparing the body in such a way that the stress does not affect mind and the body. But, removing the known situation may not be possible all the time. For example, if you are stressful in a job, resigning may not be feasible.

The modality, therefore, is to change your interpretation towards the stressful situation for which one should start thinking positively and different and choose the resultant options within, which do not hurt the heart.

Changing of the interpretation is what in allopathy is described as cognitive behavior therapy, the origin of which comes from Ayurveda and in Bhagwad Gita where Lord Krishna counsels Arjuna following principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

In the first chapter, Lord Krishna only listens to Arjuna explaining the importance of listening, listening and listening. The second counseling session or the second chapter is the longest conversation between Arjuna and Krishna and shows the importance of first effective counseling session. From 3rd to 17th chapters, Krishna explains what he has conveyed in chapter 2 and that tells us the importance of reasoning out every doubt that a person under stress has. During this session, Krishna creates both fear as well as consoles Arjuna again indicating the importance of these two factors in counseling. In the last chapter, Krishna revises what he has taught, which is consistent with the last rule of counseling to make sure that the patient has learnt what has been taught to him.

Apart from counseling, the body can be prepared in such a way that stress does not bother one. This can be done by learning the art of pranayam, relaxation, meditation, regular exercise, Dosh–specific diet and using certain Ayurvedic Rasayans, which sterilize the brain functions. Brahmi, an Ayurvedic herb, is one such Rasayan, which boosts the brain.

One should avoid taking allopathic anti–anxiety drugs, unless necessary which, of course, may be required in an acute panic state.

Why in hypothermia the body can be revived even after hours of death?

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It is well known phenomenon that Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is not successful if the body temperature is less than 35oC.

In hypothermic deaths, a person can be revived even after hours of cardiac arrest. Only once the body temperature is brought back to normal CPR will be effective.

That would mean that consciousness gets frozen and does not leave the body when the temperature is below 35oC.

This forms the basis for induced hypothermia after death to revive the brain.

The modern science is silent about this mechanism but the ancient Indian literature talks about it in great detail. As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1), the process of death takes time and is a sequential process.

First, the motor  indriyas organs (Karma Indriyas) stop functioning followed by sensory indriya organs (Gnanaindriyas) followed by cessation of pana or respiration.

Once this happens, the frozen sensory organs, motor  organs, manas (mind, body, memory and ego) and prana have to get dissolved in Tej and then leave the body which means presence of Tej is the most important factor for consciousness to leave the body.

In modern science, Tej would be governed by the body temperature. That means if the body temperature is low, the motor and sensory indriyas and manas Product (Vritti) will find no heat or Tej to dissolve and come out of the body.

Therefore, till the body temperature (Tej) is brought back to normal, the indriyas will seize to function but still be revivable.

This process may take upto 48 minutes in presence of Tej and there is no time limit if Tej is absent.

A clinically dead person with cardiac arrest, therefore will have absent functioning of Manas organs, Sensory organs, mind, intellect, memory and ego with no respiration but yet revivable back to life.