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Dr K K Aggarwal

Why do we Burn Camphor in any Pooja?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Why do we Burn Camphor in any Pooja?

No aarti is performed without camphor. Camphor burns itself out completely, when lit, without leaving a trace.

Camphor represents our inherent tendencies or vasanas. When lit by the fire of knowledge about the self, the vasanas burn themselves out completely, not leaving a trace of ego.

Ego is responsible for a sense of individuality that keeps us separate from the Lord or consciousness.

In addition, camphor, on burning, emits a pleasant perfume. This signifies that as we burn our ego, we can only spread love and nothing else.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

ECG not a reliable marker for predicting heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on ECG not a reliable marker for predicting heart disease

Doing an ECG has limited utility when it comes to predicting future heart problems for people being examined for chest pain.Chest pain is the most common reason for seeking medical care for a possible heart trouble, and an ECG is commonly done in such people. ECG results can come out as normal in the first six hours, even in frank heart attacks. The commonest mistake made in the emergency rooms is missing the diagnosis of heart attack on ECG.

The history and physical findings continue to be the most important parameters.• Chest pain, which can be pinpointed by a finger, is not a heart pain.• Pain lasting for <30 seconds is not related to heart.• Heart pain presents as diffuse pain in the center of the chest, which lasts more than minutes and is characterized by heaviness, burning, discomfort, or pain often triggered by physical or mental exertion.An exercise stress test should be done when there is doubt. If negative, reassess the patient for potential risk factors.

If the patient is found to be at high risk, then even with negative treadmill test, he should be subjected to risk reduction management in a bid to prevent future heart attacks.

High risk patients include smokers, those with high blood pressure, obesity, high cholesterol and diabetes.

ECG not a reliable marker for predicting heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on ECG not a reliable marker for predicting heart disease

Doing an ECG is of little use in predicting future heart problems for people who are examined because of chest pain.

Chest pain is the most common reason people seek medical attention for possible heart trouble, and an ECG is a common test for such people. ECG can be normal in the first six hours even in frank heart attacks. Missing the diagnosis of heart attack on ECG is the commonest mistake done in the emergency rooms.

The classical history and physical findings still remain the most important parameters.

  • Chest pain, which can be pinpointed by a finger, is not a heart pain.
  • Pain lasting less than 30 seconds is not a heart pain.
  • Heart pain is diffuse pain in the center of the chest lasting more than minutes and manifesting as heaviness, burning, discomfort, heaviness or pain often precipitated by physical or mental exertion.

Do an exercise stress test when in doubt; if negative, these patients should be reassessed for risk factors.

If the patient is at high risk, then even with negative treadmill, he/she should undergo risk reduction management for prevention of future heart attacks.

High risk patients are smokers, those with presence of high blood pressure, obesity, high cholesterol and diabetes.

  1. Rule of 30 seconds: Chest pain, burning, discomfort, heaviness in the center of the chest lasting for over 30 seconds and not localized to a point unless proved otherwise is a heat pain. To this rule, add the rule of pin pointing finger i.e. any chest pain which can be pin pointed by a finger is not a heart pain.
  2. Rule of 5: If you suspect a heart attack, do not wait for more than five minutes and get to a hospital right away.
  3. Rule of 3: Reach hospital within 3 hours in case of heart attack to receive clot-removing angioplasty or clot-dissolving drugs.
  4.  Rule of 300: Chew a tablet of water-soluble 300 mg aspirin and take 300 mg clopidogrel tablets at the onset of cardiac chest pain (heart attack) to reduce mortality.
  5. Rule of 10: Door-to-ECG time is the time within which an ECG should be done in the emergency room and it should be less than 10 minutes.
  6. Rule of 30: Door-to-needle time in acute heart attack is the time before which the clot-dissolving drug should be given after a patient reaches the hospital. In ST elevation heart attack, the door-to-needle time should be less than 30 minutes.
  7. Rule of 40: First-onset acidity or first-onset asthma after the age of 40: Rule out heart attack or heart asthma.
  8. Rule of 90: Door-to-balloon time is the ideal time for primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute heart attack by an experienced operator and should be less than 90 minutes.