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Dr K K Aggarwal

Kidney patients more at risk for future heart attacks

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Chronic kidney disease patients with kidney function less than 60% are included in the list of criteria for defining people at highest risk for future heart attacks.

In a large cohort Canadian study published in The Lancet led by Dr Marcello Tonelli at University of Alberta, patients with only chronic kidney disease had a significantly higher rate of heart attacks than those who only had diabetes. Those who had already had a heart attack had the highest overall rate of heart attacks.

Chronic kidney disease should be regarded as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent, similar to diabetes, as patients with the condition have high rates of cardiovascular events, particularly when they also have proteinuria. When chronic kidney disease was defined more stringently with kidney function less than 45% and increased proteinuria, the rate of first heart attack was higher in those with both chronic kidney disease and diabetes than in those with either disorder alone.

Heart disease starts in youth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing. The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.

The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart disease than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat.

Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increases in the boys and drops in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls.

Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. Insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rises until the age of 19 years.

Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Blood pressure drugs should be taken at night.

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to heart attacks, paralysis and heart failure. Most such attacks occur in the early morning hours. Pulse, blood pressure and thickening of platelets are all higher in the early morning hours. Controlling early morning blood pressure can reduce cardiovascular mortality. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, among patients with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure, taking at least one antihypertensive drug at bedtime significantly improves blood pressure control, with an associated decrease in risk for cardiovascular events. The study included 661 patients with chronic kidney disease who were randomly assigned either to take all prescribed anti BP drugs on awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime. Patients were followed for a median of 5.4 years; during that time, patients who took at least 1 BP–lowering drug at bedtime had approximately one third of the cardiac risk compared with those who took all medications on awakening. A similar significant reduction in cardiac deaths, heart attacks and paralysis was noted with bedtime dosing. Patients taking their medications at bedtime also had a significantly lower mean BP while sleeping. For each 5 mmHg decrease in mean sleep–time systolic upper BP, there was a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow–up. Potential explanation for the benefit of night time treatment may be associated with the effect of night time treatment on urinary albumin excretion levels. Urinary albumin excretion is significantly reduced after bedtime, but not morning, treatment.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood
Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood
Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood
Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Give BP Drugs At Night

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Blood pressure drugs should be taken at night .

Uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to heart attacks, paralysis and heart failure. Most such attacks occur in the early morning hours. Pulse, blood pressure and thickening of platelets are all higher in the early morning hours.

Controlling early morning blood pressure can reduce cardiovascular mortality.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, among patients with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure taking at least one antihypertensive drug at bedtime significantly improves blood pressure control, with an associated decrease in risk for cardiovascular events.

The study included 661 patients with chronic kidney disease who were randomly assigned either to take all prescribed anti BP drugs on awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime.

Patients were followed for a median of 5.4 years; during that time, patients who took at least 1 BP-lowering drug at bedtime had approximately one third of the cardiac risk compared with those who took all medications on awakening.

A similar significant reduction in cardiac deaths, heart attacks and paralysis was noted with bedtime dosing. Patients taking their medications at bedtime also had a significantly lower mean BP while sleeping.

For each 5 mmHg decrease in mean sleep-time systolic upper BP, there was a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow-up.

Potential explanation for the benefit of night time treatment may be associated with the effect of night time treatment on urinary albumin excretion levels. Urinary albumin excretion is significantly reduced after bedtime, but not morning, treatment.