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Dr K K Aggarwal

Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Age, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, high lipids, smoking, drugs, heart disease, upright cycling for more than 3 hours a week can cause erectile dysfunction in males. For those who ride bicycles for more than 3 hours a week should do so in a reclining position and not upright position.

A man is considered to have erectile dysfunction when he cannot acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity for sexual intercourse. Any man may, at one time or another during his life, experience periodic or isolated sexual failures.

The term “impotent” is reserved for those men who experience erectile failure during attempted intercourse more than 75 percent of the time. Heart disease increases the risk for later erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction may be an early warning sign of future heart disease. Men with erectile dysfunction without an obvious cause (e.g., pelvic trauma), and who have no symptoms of heart disease, should be screened for heart disease prior to treatment since there are potential cardiac risks associated with sexual activity in patients with heart disease.

Eight of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications list impotence as a side effect and it is estimated that 25 percent of cases of erectile dysfunction are due to drugs.

Depression, stress, or the drugs used to treat depression can result in erectile dysfunction.

Neurologic causes of erectile dysfunction include stroke, spinal cord or back injury, multiple sclerosis, or dementia. In addition, pelvic trauma, prostate. Surgery or priapism may cause erectile dysfunction.

Bicycling, less obvious, but of increasing importance, has been the possible association of erectile dysfunction with bicycling. Anything that places prolonged pressure on the pudendal and cavernosal nerves or compromises blood flow to the penile artery can result in penile numbness and impotence.

Cycling-induced impotence, is primarily a problem of serious cyclists and has been reported to occur in Norwegian men competing in a 540 km bicycle race.

The penile numbness is attributed to the pressure on the perineal nerves whereas the erectile dysfunction is thought to be due to a decrease in oxygen pressure in the pudendal arteries.

Recreational cyclists, those who cycle for less than 3 hours per week and men who cycle in a reclining position avoid the sustained intense pressure on the penile nerve and artery and are less likely to experience sexual side effects. Continued cycling in a seated upright position can reduce the penile oxygen levels lasting 10 minutes.




Eating fast food can cause liver damage

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Eating at least two fast foods meals every day and restricting levels of physical activity to no more than 5,000 steps a day can lead to signs of liver damage or weight gain as per a Swedish study wherein at the end of the 4 weeks, the fast food eaters had put on an average of 6.5 kilograms (14.3 pounds). After just 1 week on the fast food diet, blood tests showed sharp increases in a liver enzyme called SGPT. SGPT levels were more than quadrupled over the 4-week study period. Increased SGPT levels are used to diagnose liver disease before symptoms develop. In 11 fast food dieters, SGPT rose to levels suggestive of liver damage. The SGPT increases were linked to weight gain and higher sugar and Carbohydrate intake

Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

Age, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, high lipids, smoking, drugs, heart disease, upright cycling for more than 3 hours a week can cause erectile dysfunction (ED) in males. Those who ride bicycles for more than 3 hours a week should do so in a reclining position and not upright position. A man is considered to have ED when he cannot acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity for sexual intercourse. Any man may, at one time or another during his life, experience periodic or isolated sexual failures. The term “impotent” is reserved for those men who experience erectile failure during attempted intercourse more than 75% of the time. Heart disease increases the risk for later ED; ED also may be an early warning sign of future heart disease. Men with erectile dysfunction without an obvious cause (e.g., pelvic trauma), and who have no symptoms of heart disease, should be screened for heart disease prior to treatment since there are potential cardiac risks associated with sexual activity in patients with heart disease.

Eight of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications list impotence as a side effect and it is estimated that 25% of cases of ED are due to drugs. Depression, stress, or the drugs used to treat depression can result in ED. Neurologic causes include stroke, spinal cord or back injury, multiple sclerosis, or dementia. In addition, pelvic trauma, prostate. Surgery or priapism may cause ED.

A less obvious, but of increasing importance, has been the possible association of ED with bicycling. Anything that places prolonged pressure on the pudendal and cavernosal nerves or compromises blood flow to the penile artery can result in penile numbness and impotence. Cycling-induced impotence, is primarily a problem of serious cyclists and has been reported to occur in Norwegian men competing in a 540 km bicycle race. The penile numbness is attributed to the pressure on the perineal nerves whereas the erectile dysfunction is thought to be due to a decrease in oxygen pressure in the pudendal arteries.

Recreational cyclists, those who cycle for less than 3 hours per week and men who cycle in a reclining position avoid the sustained intense pressure on the penile nerve and artery and are less likely to experience sexual side effects. Continued cycling in a seated upright position can reduce the penile oxygen levels lasting 10 minutes.

Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

Age, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, high lipids, smoking, drugs, heart disease, upright cycling for more than 3 hours a week can cause erectile dysfunction in males. For those who ride bicycles for more than 3 hours a week should do so in a reclining position and not upright position.

A man is considered to have erectile dysfunction when he cannot acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity for sexual intercourse. Any man may, at one time or another during his life, experience periodic or isolated sexual failures.

The term “impotent” is reserved for those men who experience erectile failure during attempted intercourse more than 75 percent of the time. Heart disease increases the risk for later erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction may be an early warning sign of future heart disease. Men with erectile dysfunction without an obvious cause (e.g., pelvic trauma), and who have no symptoms of heart disease, should be screened for heart disease prior to treatment since there are potential cardiac risks associated with sexual activity in patients with heart disease.

Eight of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications list impotence as a side effect and it is estimated that 25 percent of cases of erectile dysfunction are due to drugs.

Depression, stress, or the drugs used to treat depression can result in erectile dysfunction.

Neurologic causes of erectile dysfunction include stroke, spinal cord or back injury, multiple sclerosis, or dementia. In addition, pelvic trauma, prostate. Surgery or priapism may cause erectile dysfunction.

Bicycling — Less obvious, but of increasing importance, has been the possible association of erectile dysfunction with bicycling.

Anything that places prolonged pressure on the pudendal and cavernosal nerves or compromises blood flow to the penile artery can result in penile numbness and impotence.

Cycling–induced impotence, is primarily a problem of serious cyclists and has been reported to occur in Norwegian men competing in a 540 km bicycle race.

The penile numbness is attributed to the pressure on the perineal nerves whereas the erectile dysfunction is thought to be due to a decrease in oxygen pressure in the pudendal arteries.

Recreational cyclists, those who cycle for less than 3 hours per week and men who cycle in a reclining position avoid the sustained intense pressure on the penile nerve and artery and are less likely to experience sexual side effects. Continued cycling in a seated upright position can reduce the penile oxygen levels lasting ten minutes.

Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

Age, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, high lipids, smoking, drugs, heart disease, upright cycling for more than 3 hrs a week can cause erectile dysfunction in males. For those who ride bicycles for more than 3 hours a week should do so in a reclining position and not upright position.

A man is considered to have erectile dysfunction when he cannot acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity for sexual intercourse. Any man may, at one time or another during his life, experience periodic or isolated sexual failures.

The term “impotent” is reserved for those men who experience erectile failure during attempted intercourse more than 75 percent of the time. Heart disease increases the risk for later erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction may be an early warning sign of future heart disease. Men with erectile dysfunction without an obvious cause (e.g., pelvic trauma), and who have no symptoms of heart disease, should be screened for heart disease prior to treatment since there are potential cardiac risks associated with sexual activity in patients with heart disease.

Eight of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications list impotence as a side effect and it is estimated that 25 percent of cases of erectile dysfunction are due to drugs.

Depression, stress, or the drugs used to treat depression can result in erectile dysfunction.

Neurologic causes of erectile dysfunction include stroke, spinal cord or back injury, multiple sclerosis, or dementia. In addition, pelvic trauma, prostate. Surgery or priapism may cause erectile dysfunction.

Bicycling –Less obvious, but of increasing importance, has been the possible association of erectile dysfunction with bicycling. Anything that places prolonged pressure on the pudendal and cavernosal nerves or compromises blood flow to the penile artery can result in penile numbness and impotence.

Cycling-induced impotence, is primarily a problem of serious cyclists and has been reported to occur in Norwegian men competing in a 540 km bicycle race.

The penile numbness is attributed to the pressure on the perineal nerves whereas the erectile dysfunction is thought to be due to a decrease in oxygen pressure in the pudendal arteries.

Recreational cyclists, those who cycle for less than 3 hours per week and men who cycle in a reclining position avoid the sustained intense pressure on the penile nerve and artery and are less likely to experience sexual side effects. Continued cycling in a seated upright position can reduce the penile oxygen levels lasting ten minutes.

Even Children Can Have Acidity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Children who have continuing recurrence of cough and croup could be suffering from stomach acid reflux problems.

Croup or ‘Kali Khansi’ as it is called in local parlance is recognized by a loud cough that often sounds like the barking of a seal. It can cause rapid or difficult breathing, and sometimes wheezing. Croup is thought to be caused by a virus, but reflux acidity has been suggested as a possible trigger.

In gastroesophageal reflux disease, stomach acid causes swelling and inflammation of the larynx, which narrows the airway. It can trigger more swelling with any kind of viral or respiratory infection.

Identifying children with gastroesophageal reflux disease could help treat and improve recurring croup. It is unusual for a child to have three or more bouts of croup over a short period of time. These children need to be evaluated.

The same is true for adults also. Patients with non responding asthma should be investigated for underlying acidity as the cause of acute asthma.

Passive smoking can cause dementia

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People exposed to secondhand smoke may face as much as a 44 percent increased risk of developing dementia.

Smoking is already known to increase the risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

A study from Peninsula Medical School in Exeter, England published in the journal BMJ has shown that there is an association between cognitive function and exposure to passive smoking. The risk increases with the amount of exposure to secondhand smoke. For people at the highest levels of exposure, the risk is probably higher.

The study collected data on more than 4,800 nonsmokers who were over 50 years old and tested saliva samples from these people for levels of cotinine, a product of nicotine that can be found in saliva for about 25 hours after exposure to smoke. The researchers found that people with the highest cotinine levels had a 44 percent increased risk of cognitive impairment, compared with people with the lowest cotinine levels. And, while the risk of impairment was lower in people with lower cotinine levels, the risk was still significant.

Passive smoking is also associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart disease