Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

Krishna teaches us the path of acquiring inner happiness. It can be understood by the four cycles of Krishna described in the Vedic literature: Krishna the Child, Krishna the Husband and Friend, Krishna the Preacher and Krishna the Sanyasi.

The childhood of Krishna describes the methodology and components of a child education. Krishna, pure consciousness, was born as the eight child of Devki representing that during pregnancy one needs to follow the eight limbs of yoga to get a child with no disease.

Initial childhood is full of pure consciousness that spreads love to everyone without any discrimination. The only thing the child during this period does is to steal and spread love and that is what Krishna as Makhan Chor depicts.With time the child’s mental faculty starts developing and distracting the child’s mind. During this phase of life, the child needs to be taught to control the thoughts and mind by learning viveka (discrimination between good and bad) and doing abhyas or hard work. The episode of Krishna entering into the pond (thoughts) fighting with Kaliya (duality of mind) and controlling it represents the same. This also coincides with the time a child should be sent to the school.The next phase of childhood is activation of intellect which in Krishna’s life is depicted as the questions in his mind “Radha kyun gori, main kyun kala?” The incident is during Krishna playing Holi with Gopis and Radha. This happens when the child gets an exposure to the worldly atmosphere and starts getting attached to it. This is the time for the child to be taught control of mind and intellect by one point concentration on the object of concentration. This is also the time when the child should be taught the purpose of life, and the aim for which he has to live in future (usually adolescent by this time).

Krishna controls the intellect by winning over Indra (intellect) and raising the Govardhan Parvat (turmoil of the mind) on one finger and saves the public from the rainy storm (wavering thoughts). The one finger here indicates one point concentration on the object of concentration. Once the child is taught how to control the intellect, he or she completes spiritual education and learns about the true self.

Control of mind (Kalia) and intellect (Indra) leads the child to the next phase of life. In Krishna’s life it coincides with Ras Leela where Krishna is seen dancing with Radha and every Gopi. This also reflects the time for the internal ego to get killed and one acquires the qualities of humility. Killing of Kansa depicts the killing of ego. Once the ego is killed and humility is acquired, Radha and flute are no more required and Krishna is now a perfect man and is ready to enter the next ashram of life called Grahasthashram. Radha (body) gets merged with consciousness and flute (humility) is a part of the nature. One now acquires a sudarshan chakra or a weapon to take decisions and adopt the good and kill the evil.

Krishna is always depicted as a blue color God with yellow clothes and a flute in his hands. Blue color indicates everything is possible and yellow clothes indicate that one can acquire it provided one has the flute, a hollow wood representing egoless nature.

Whenever Krishna is shown with a flute, the female figure with him is Radha with blue sari and yellow color, along with gopis (thoughts) dancing around them indicating that the thoughts of the mind are in symphony with each other and there is a union of mind, body and soul. Here the soul is represented by Krishna, mind by the flute, thoughts with gopis and body with Radha.

The second phase of Krishna’s life is shown as a perfect achiever and friend, which is evident from the story of Sudama.

The third phase of Krishna’s life represents Krishna as an advisor, which shows his role in Mahabharata and his preaching in Bhagavad Gita. He teaches the message of Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Gnana Yoga and Raja Yoga for acquiring excellence in life and inner happiness.

The last role of Krishna as a sanyasi is the end of Krishna’s life. The four cycles also coincide with the four ashrams of life.To achieve inner happiness the message from Krishna’s life is to learn to make efforts to control the mind, to win over the intellect by one point concentration and to acquire qualities of humility and killing internal ego. Only with this can one become a perfect man like Krishna.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Lifestyle changes should start in childhood

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Lifestyle changes should start in childhood

The seeds of heart blockages are born while a person is in his adolescence or childhood. Prevention, therefore, must start right at that age.
The doctors said that heart attack cannot be given or accepted as a Gift. It takes minimum 15 years to live a lifestyle against the laws of nature to develop early blockages. Heart disease, therefore, is reversible and gives you enough time to reverse. They also said that in diet one should adopt the principle of moderations and variety and include all seven colours and six tastes in their diet.
Traditional dances are better than western dance as classical traditional dance is a mix of yoga, meditation, relaxation and exercise.

Allopathic Medical Vrat

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Allopathic Medical Vrat

 

There was a time everybody in India, especially the women, used to observe regular fasts. In my childhood, I saw my mother not only observing fasts herself but also insisting upon my sisters to fast once a week, an extra fast once in a month and observe 2 Navratras in a year of 9 days each. This sums up to be around 80 fasts in a year.

When I go back to my childhood, I remember the fast used to be one day of avoiding cereals altogether. We were allowed to eat chapatis made of Kuttu flour, singharha flour, samak rice and chaulai daal (all fruits).

As children, we could never understand the meaning and/or significance of fasts. Today India is fast becoming a hub of diabetes, heart diseases and insulin resistance. All these disease conditions are linked with not observing fasts or eating high carb diets every day.

The major culprit is eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates. Recollecting our mythology when only one king Raja Dashrath died of heart attack, it only signifies that our mythological lifestyle was preventing heart diseases in India. The western culture, which is now spreading fast in India, involves eating carbohydrates, especially, refined carbohydrates (white sugar, white rice, white maida) every day.

I recently conducted a survey and found that women who observe weekly fast or vrat have lower incidence of metabolic syndrome. But, today, girls and women are failing to observe ‘vrat’ or ‘spiritual vrata’.

Therefore, they must be made to understand the same in the language of a ‘medical vrat’. A simpler version of ‘vrat’ can be – not eating carbohydrates at all once in a week and replacing them with fruits and vegetables.

I usually suggest that once in a week, one should eat only fruits and vegetables and at the most can have milk, curd. If still someone has desires, can have besan ka chila.

Diagnosis of hypertension in childhood requires repeated BP measurements

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Diagnosis of hypertension in childhood requires repeated BP measurements

Hypertension should be confirmed based on three blood pressure measurements at separate clinical visits.

Normative BP percentiles are based upon data on gender, age, height, and blood pressure measurements from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and other population–based studies.

In a study initial BP measurement was normal (below the 90th percentile), pre–hypertensive (systolic or diastolic BP between the 90th or 95th percentile) and hypertensive (systolic or diastolic BP =95th percentile) in 82, 13, and 5 percent of children.

At follow–up, subsequent hypertensive measurements were observed in only 4 percent of the 10,848 children who had initial hypertensive values. In the cohort, the overall prevalence of hypertension was 0.3 percent.

Source: Lo JC, Sinaiko A, Chandra M, et al. Prehypertension and hypertension in community–based pediatric practice. Pediatrics 2013;131:e415.

The seeds of heart blockages are born while a person is in his adolescence or childhood. Prevention, therefore, must start right at that age, said Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India, Padma Shri Dr. S.C. Manchanda and Dr. A.K. Jhingan, Diabetes Specialist, in a joint statement. They were participating in an open house group discussion organized at Ryan International School, Vasant Kunj as a part of the 19th MTNL Perfect Health Mela being organized by the Heart Care Foundation of India in association with Department of Health, Government of Delhi.

The doctors said that heart attack cannot be given or accepted as a Gift. It takes minimum 15 years to live a lifestyle against the laws of nature to develop early blockages. Heart disease, therefore, is reversible and gives you enough time to reverse. They also said that in diet one should adopt the principle of moderations and variety and include all seven colours and six tastes in their diet.

Noted Kathak Dancers, Nalini and Kamalini, who were celebrity guests said that aerobic dance in any form should be part and parcel of school health programme. Traditional dances are better than western dance as classical traditional dance is a mix of yoga, meditation, relaxation and exercise.

The main Perfect Health Mela will start on 7th November, 2012 at Constitution Club of India and will have a mix of exhibitions, competitions, workshops, seminars, entertainment incorporating all pathies under one roof. The entry to the Mela will be free. The programme will also be aired on 7th November, 2012 6pm on Fit Delhi Dilli Aaj Tak.