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Dr K K Aggarwal

Soul does not leave the body immediately after the death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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According to Prashna Upanishad, at the time of death, the Prana Vayu (life force and respiration) merges with Udana Vayu (brain stem reflexes) and leaves the body. But this does not happen immediately after clinical death, which is defined as stoppage of heart and respiration. Medically the term used for clinically dead patients is sudden cardiac arrest.

As per the modern medicine, in cardiac arrest, the brain does not die for the next 10 minutes and during this period, if the heart can be revived, life can be brought back.

The revival of patient during this period can be remembered by the ‘Formula of 10’: Within 10 minutes of the stoppage of heart (cardiac arrest), if effective chest compressions are given for the next ten minutes with a speed of 100 per minutes (10X10), 80% of the cardiac arrest victims can be revived.

This period can be much longer in hypothermia state. If the temperature of the body is low, the soul does not leave the body till the temperature is brought back to normal. Today, this property of soul is also used as therapeutic measure where patients who cannot be revived in the first 10 minutes of clinical death are put in a freezing chamber and artificial hypothermia is produced and these patients can then be transported to an advance cardiac centre where even after 24 hours, resuscitation measures can be applied after re-warming the body. Many people have been revived even after 24 hours of cardiac arrest with such a technology.

There are instances in literature where a newborn with hypothermia was declared dead but revived in the cremation ground when the environment heat brought the body temperature to normal and the pressure of the wood worked like cardiac massage.

This aspect of “life after death” is a contribution of the modern science to the Vedic science. Though in Vedic literature, it was well known phenomenon as Savitri brought life back into Satyavan even after his clinical death.

Take home message is that one should not declare a patient dead in the first 10 minutes; give cardiac massage and try reviving him with chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

Is time and place of death pre-defined?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Some gurus teach that the time and place of death is predefined and some do not. I personally feel that life and respiration are predefined and not day and time of death.


It is something like – water in a sponge will become empty when every drop of water drains out but it does not matter how much time it takes to come out. It is therefore possible to postpone or prolong the fulfillment of Prarabhdha Karma and postpone death.

As per the Karma theory, unless our Prarabdha Karmas (decided at the time of death and birth) are enjoyed and fulfilled, one cannot die.  But once the Prarabhdha Karmas are fulfilled, death is inevitable.

Another unanswered question is ‘can Prarabdha karmas be modified’? Fate or destiny may not change, which means one may not be able to prolong the quantity of life but can definitely change the quality of life. The quality of life can be changed by modifying Agami (present) Karmas.

Sanchit Karmas can be burnt with the file of knowledge about self. Prarabdha Karmas have to be experienced and Agami Karmas can be neutralized by positive and negative Karmas to Zero in the present life.

The last few Prarabdha Karmas experienced can thus be slowed down by the net positive result of the Agami karmas.

I want to live after my death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In my workshops, whenever I ask delegates as to how long they want to live, the answer I get from most of them is 60, 70 or 80 years. While answering they forget that they are only talking about the death of the physical body but what about the mental, social, intellectual and spiritual bodies.

It is well known that the soul never dies and so do your Sanskars and good work done. The aim of life should be that one should live even after the death of his or her physical body. It is your good Karmas, which keep your memories alive even after your physical death.

It is equally true that your bad Karmas too can make people remember you after death but that is not the purpose of life. We would like to be remembered as Rama and not like Ravana after death.

In Vedic language your present is decided by your past and your future is decided by your present. To improve your future you need to work positively in your present.

When you start working positively in your present moment, you will start neutralizing your bad karmas. It is like washing a dirty shirt which will not become stain free in one washing. Only with repeated washings can it become stain free. Similarly washing away your bad karmas with good karmas will take time.

It is possible that even when one starts doing good Karmas, one may still suffer as the sum total of past karmas may not have been neutralized by that time.

For example, if a dacoit surrenders and wants to live a civilian life he may be pardoned to some extent but may still be jailed for some duration of time. In other word he may be pardoned from death sentence and given life sentence.

As per Bhagavad Gita, whatever your thoughts are at the time of death will decide the atmosphere you will get in your rebirth.

It also says that whatever will be your thoughts throughout your life will be your thoughts at the time of your death.

So do not expect that you can acquire positive thoughts at the time of death if you have been thinking negative throughout your life The gist is to start doing good actions in the present.

All about death by hanging

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Hanging is the simplest and yet highly effective method used by people who commit suicide.
  • It is the most common cause of suicide next to poisoning in women and gunshot injury in men.
  • Hanging accounts for 53% of suicides in males and 39% in females.
  • It has a high mortality rate up to 70%.
  • The materials required are easily available and of wide range and therefore it is difficult to prevent.
  • Hanging can be suspension hanging or drop hanging.
  • Suspension hanging is hanging of the body by the neck and drop hanging involves calculated drop to break the neck.
  • In suspension hanging, a person takes 10 to 20 minutes to die resulting into a painful death. Materials used are rope, bed sheet, shoe laces, telephone extension cables, and threads of the chairs/mattresses.
  • Suspension hanging causes compression of carotid artery, jugular veins and the airway.
  • In suspension hanging, 5 kg of pressure is required to compress the carotid artery; 2 kg of pressure is required to compress the jugular veins and 15 kg of pressure is required to compress the airway. Unconsciousness occurs in 5 to13 seconds.
  • Full suspension is not necessary. A person can die even with partial suspension.
  • Near hanging is the term used for those who survive.

How to convert Dakshinayana into Uttarayana at the time of death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Bhagavad Gita whatever your thoughts are through life will be your thoughts at the time of your death and whatever thoughts are there at the time of your death will be your thoughts in your future birth.

Bhagavad Gita says that the best time to die is Uttarayana, before full moon, in day time or in the presence of Yagna. Does it mean that the people who die in Dakshinayana or 15 days before Amavasya or during night will suffer and will not get liberation or they will go to the hell?

No. If this would have the intention, Bhagavad Gita would not have mentioned it at all as this would have created unrest in 50% of the society.

What they probably meant was that everybody at the time of death should be in a positive frame of mind. If they are not, efforts should be made to create positive frame of mind for them which means that if a person is dying in night or 15 days before Amavasya, one can create an atmosphere of Uttarayana or full moon by creating enough artificial light as if it is day time or doing Yagna in the vicinity of the dying person and/or enchanting of any religious Mantra, for example, Gayatri Mantra in the ear of the dying person.

Efforts should also be made to talk positive in his or her presence. Ayurvedic or Homeopathic consultants can be contacted if they have any medicine which can convert negative state of mind into positive state of mind.

In the process of death a dying person can hear till his last karma indriyas and gnana indriyas are functioning.

In Hindu mythology, chanting of Rama or Aum at the time of death does the same thing.

How to convert Dakshinayana into Uttarayana at the time of death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Bhagavad Gita whatever your thoughts are through life will be your thoughts at the time of your death and whatever your thoughts at the time of your death will be your thoughts in your future birth.

Bhagavad Gita says that the best time to die is Uttarayana, before full moon, in day time or in the presence of Yagna. Does that mean the people who die in Dakshinayana or 15 days before Amavasya or during night will suffer and will not get liberation or they will go to the hell?

No. If this would have the intention, Bhagavad Gita would not have mentioned it at all as this would have created unrest in 50% of the society.

Preventing death due to hypothermia

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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People can die of hypothermia in this season. Imagine a situation when you come across two people lying in a JJ cluster area with no clothes early in the morning. One of them is shivering and the other one is not. The one who is shivering indicates that his body is trying to compensate with the low body co-temperature.

The other one, who is not shivering, may be dead, dying or normal.

Recall your naturopathy teaching “Sar Thanda, Pet Naram and Paon Garam”. If the soles of the feet and the feet are cold and the person is not shivering, this is a medical emergency. On the contrary, if the person is not shivering and the feet are warm, it is not medical emergency.

Therefore, hypothermia with no shivering and hyperthermia with no sweating are bad signs.

All about death by hanging

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on All about death by hanging

  • Hanging is the simplest and yet highly effective method used by people who commit suicide.
  • It is the most common cause of suicide after poisoning in women and after gunshot injury in men.
  • Hanging accounts for 53% of suicides in males and 39% in females.
  • It has a high mortality rate up to 70%.
  • The materials required are easily available and of wide range and therefore it is difficult to prevent.
  • Hanging can be suspension hanging or drop hanging.
  • Suspension hanging is hanging of the body by the neck and drop hanging involves calculated drop to break the neck.
  • In suspension hanging, a person takes 10 to 20 minutes to die resulting into a painful death. Materials used are rope, bed sheet, shoe laces, telephone extension cables, thread of the chairs/mattresses.
  • Suspension hanging causes compression of carotid artery, jugular veins and the airway.
  • In suspension hanging, 5 kg of pressure is required to compress the carotid artery; 2 kg of pressure is required to compress the jugular veins and 15 kg of pressure is required to compress the airway. Unconsciousness occurs in 5 to13 seconds.
  • Full suspension is not necessary, even with partial suspension a person can die.
  • Near hanging is the term used for those who survive.

Is time and place of death pre–defined?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Is time and place of death pre–defined?

Some gurus teach that the time and place of death is predefined and some do not. I personally feel that life and respiration are predefined and not day and time of death.

It is something like – water in a sponge will become empty when every drop of water comes out but it does not matter how much time it takes to come out. It is therefore possible to postpone or prolong the fulfillment of Prarabhdha Karma and postpone death.

As per the Karma theory, unless our Prarabdha Karmas (decided at the time of death and birth) are enjoyed and fulfilled, one cannot die. But once the Prarabhdha Karmas are fulfilled, death is inevitable.

Another unanswered question is ‘can Prarabdha karma be modified’? Fate or destiny may not change, which means one may not be able to prolong the quantity of life but can definitely change the quality of life. The quality of life can be changed by modifying Agami (present Karmas).

Sanchit Karmas can be burnt with the file of knowledge about self. Prarabdha Karmas have to be experienced and Agami Karma can be neutralized by positive and negative Karmas to Zero in the present life.

The last few Prarabdha Karma experienced can thus be slowed down by the net positive result of their Agami karmas.

Preventing death due to hypothermia

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Preventing death due to hypothermia

People can die of hypothermia in this season. Imagine a situation when you come across two people lying in a JJ cluster area with no clothes early in the morning. One of them is shivering and the other one is not. The one who is shivering indicates that his body is trying to compensate with the low body co–temperature.

The other one, who is not shivering, may be dead, dying or normal.

Recall your naturopathy teaching “Sar Thanda, Pet Naram and Paon Garam“. If the sole of the feet and the feet are cold and the person is not shivering, this is a medical emergency. On the contrary, if the person is not shivering and the feet are warm, it is not medical emergency.

Therefore, hypothermia with no shivering and hyperthermia with no sweating are bad signs.

Revival of heart after death

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • It is possible to save the life of a person within 10 minutes of death.
  • Consciousness does not leave the body till the brain is alive.
  • It takes upto 10 minutes for the brain to die permanently and once that happens, life cannot be brought back.
  • The Savitri-Satyavan story can be equated to be the first mythological example of revival with Savitri fighting with Yamraja and reviving Satyavan’s life back after sudden cardiac death.
  • Following are the terms which, if learnt properly, can save the life of a person:

o Savitri Yagna is the process of learning to revive a person after death and the technique is called CPR 10.
o Savitri Dharma means that one’s purpose of life should be to save somebody who has died accidentally and suddenly before time.
o Savitri Mantra is the mantra which should be recited by everybody till it is remembered at the level of your consciousness and the mind, “Marne ke dus minute ke under kam se kam dus minute tak 10×10=100 per minute ki raftar se apni chhati peetne ke badle mare hue aadmi ki chhati peeto”.
o Next step is Savitri Aasan i.e. in which position to save the life of the person. For this the dead person is made to lie on the floor and bystander should sit on his knees by his side.
o Next is Savitri Mudra, which means getting ready to compress the centre of the chest of the dead victim with both arms outstretched keeping the elbows straight.
o Savitri House is the location where the compression has to be done on the dead person; this should be in between the two nipples.
o Savitri Karma means to compress the centre of the chest of the dead victim with a speed of 10×10=100 per minutes.
It is possible to revive 80% of the people who die suddenly before time, especially due to heart attack, drowning and electrocution.

Important differences between women and men in the presentation of heart disease make it more difficult to establish a diagnosis in women, said Padma Shri and Dr. B.C. Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India. He was addressing a press conference as a curtain raiser to the 5th Dil Ka Darbar to be held on Sunday, 29th September. The event is being organized by the Heart Care Foundation of India at Constitution Club of India in association with Ayush, Department of Health, Government of NCTDelhi, LIC, MTNL, Central Bank ofIndia and GAIL.

Special Guests of Honour were Padma Shri & Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Awardee Yogeshwar Dutt, a Bronze Medalist at the 2012 Summer Olympics in the  60kg Freestyle wrestling, Dronacharya Awardee Yashbir Singh (Wrestling coach) and Arjuna Awardee Dharmendra Dalal, a Bronze Medalist in in 120 Kg Greco-Roman style wrestling at the 2010 Commonwealth Games.

Dr KK Aggarwal said:

1.  Women generally present 10 years later than men and with greater riskfactor burden.

2.  Women are less likely than men to have typical angina.

3. Women in the emergency department with new onset of chest pain are approached and diagnosed less aggressively than man.

4.  Women are more likely to present initially with chest pain than a more clearly defined event such as heart attack.

5.  Symptoms of heart attack in women differ from those in men.

6.Many cases of heart attack in women are unrecognized.

7.  In women, treadmill exercise has a higher false positive rate.

8. Small vessel disease is more common in women than in men.

9.  Established risk factors in women are: Presence of history of heart
blockages; age over 55 years; high LDL (bad) or low HDL (good)
cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, peripheral artery disease or family history of heart disease.

10.  Risk factors, which are more potent in women than in men are: Smoking is associated  with 50% of all coronary events in women; diabetes confers more prognostic information in women than in men.

 

Prevention in Women

For all Women

  • Moderate intensity physical activity for at least 30 minutes and for 60 to
    90 minutes for weight management on most days of the week.
  • Avoidance and cessation of cigarette smoking and passive smoking
  • Keep waist circumference less than 35 inches.
  • Take a heart-friendly diet.
  • Presence of high triglyceride levels.  One should add Omega 3 fatty acids to diet.
  • Control cholesterol level, high blood pressure and diabetes.
  • Women who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills.
  • Aspirin 80 mg in more than 65 years of age should be added
  • Treat underlying depression.

 Women at high risk

  • Aspirin 75 to 150 mg, as prevention
  • Control of blood pressure.
  • No use of anti oxidant vitamin supplement.
  • No use of folic acid support.
  • No Hormone Replacement Therapy.
  • Lowering of LDL cholesterol of less than 80.

 

Co-addressing the Press Conference, Mr GP Sinha GM (Mktg) MTNL said that the best gift we can give to our wives, mothers and sisters is an annual heart check up.  Dr NK Yadav, MHO, South Delhi, Medical Corporation; Dr. PK Sharma, MOH, NDMC; Dr NV Kamat, Director, Health Services, Delhi; and Sr representatives from Central Bank of India in a joint statement said that our concern in women should shift from breast cancer to heart awareness as the lifestyle adopted to prevent heart disease would also prevent breast cancer.

Yash Chopra’s Death Should Not Cause Treatment Panic: Not All Dengue Are Serious

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The mortality of dengue is less than 1% and that too only in selected cases said Padmashri and  Dr B C Roy National Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal President Heart Care Foundation of India. Dr Aggarwal said that the forthcoming MTNL perfect health mela will focus on identification, prevention and treatment of severe dengue.

There are three groups of patients who needs attention in dengue

1. Coexisting medical conditions, such as pregnancy, infancy, old age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and chronic hemolytic diseases, may increase the risk of severe dengue and/or complicate management. Referral for hospitalization is recommended for such patients regardless of other findings. Hospitalization should also be considered for patients who may have difficulties with outpatient follow-up or with timely self-referral should complications develop (eg, patients who live alone or who live far from a health care facility without a reliable means of transport).

2. “Alarm signs” include severe abdominal pain or tenderness, persistent vomiting, abrupt change from fever to hypothermia, mucosal bleeding, liver enlargement on physical exam, or abnormal mental status, such as disorientation.

3. Blood pressure <90/60 mmHg or fall in blood pressure by 20, Hematocrit >50 percent or rise in hematocrit by more than 20, difference between upper and lower blood pressure less than 20, evidence of bleeding other than petechiae,  true platelet count less than 20000, rise in pulse by 20

Not all dengue are serious

1. Current strains 1 and 3 are not serious

2. First attack of dengue is usually not serious

3. Dengue is not serious if one cam maintain the difference between upper and lower blood pressure more than 40

4. Dengue is not serious if one cam maintain blood volume and avoid intra vascular dehydration

Facts about dengue

• Dengue is a febrile illness that is caused by any one of four serotypes of this flavivirus (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4).

• It is endemic in more than 100 countries in tropical and subtropical regions of the world and causes an estimated 50 million infections annually worldwide.

• The greatest risk factor for the development of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome is secondary infection with a different dengue serotype from the original infecting virus. Thus, severe disease occurs primarily in patients who reside in hyperendemic areas where multiple serotypes circulate simultaneously.

• Mosquito control is the most effective approach to the prevention of dengue transmission. There is no licensed vaccine available for preventing dengue.

• Patients with dengue fever should be cautioned to maintain their fluid intake to avoid dehydration and to take paracetamol as needed for fevers and myalgias. Aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents should generally be avoided.

• It is important to manage plasma leakage in dengue hemorrhagic fever with aggressive intravascular volume repletion to prevent or reverse hypovolemic shock. Blood transfusion is appropriate only in patients with significant bleeding. The adequacy of fluid repletion should be assessed by serial determination of hematocrit, blood pressure, pulse, and urine output.

• Prophylactic platelets transfusion has no role

• Early identification of patients at higher risk for shock and other complications of dengue is important. Patients with suspected dengue who have none of the warning signs for more severe illness and can maintain their fluid intake can be managed as outpatients, but may need daily re-evaluation.

• Duration of illness – The period of maximum risk for shock is between the third and seventh day of illness. This tends to coincide with resolution of fever. Plasma leakage generally first becomes evident between 24 hours before and 24 hours after defervescence.

Insecticide spraying does not help

1. Insecticide spraying in response to dengue outbreaks, is not highly effective against A. aegypti mosquitoes, which frequently breed inside houses.

2. Community-based approaches involving education of the population in efforts to reduce breeding sites, such as discarded tires and other containers that accumulate standing water, have shown some promise.

Treatment

1. Exclude other treatable diagnoses. Patients at risk for dengue can acquire other diseases with similar clinical features, such as malaria, typhoid fever, and leptospirosis. Symptoms in patients with dengue virus infections resolve in five to seven days.

2. Patients with dengue fever should be cautioned to maintain their intake of oral fluid to avoid dehydration. Fever and myalgias can be managed as needed with paracetamol. Aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents should generally be avoided because of the risk of bleeding complications and in children because of the potential risk of Reye’s syndrome.

3. Gastrointestinal bleeding or menorrhagia in patients with DHF, and occasionally in patients with dengue fever as well, can be severe enough to require blood transfusion.

4. Platelet transfusions have not been shown to be effective at preventing or controlling hemorrhage, but may be warranted only in patients with severe thrombocytopenia (<10,000/mm3) and active bleeding.

5. Prophylactic platelet transfusions in patients with severe thrombocytopenia but without active bleeding are generally not recommended

6. Administration of intravenous vitamin K1 is recommended for patients with severe liver dysfunction or prolonged prothrombin time

7. Use of a histamine H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitor is reasonable in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, although there is no evidence of benefit.

8. Plasma leakage in DHF is important to manage with aggressive intravascular volume repletion to prevent or reverse hypovolemic shock

9. In mild cases oral rehydration may be sufficient. However, in patients with established intravascular fluid loss, intravenous fluid administration is recommended. Blood transfusion is appropriate in patients with significant bleeding; subsequent hematocrit measurements must be interpreted with caution since it is also critical to assess the adequacy of fluid repletion.

10. For patients with hypotensive shock, an initial bolus of five percent dextrose in normal saline or Ringer’s lactate (20 mL per kg of body weight) infused over 15 minutes is recommended, followed by continuous infusion (10 to 20 mL/kg per hour depending on the clinical response) until vital signs and urine output normalize. For patients who improve, the infusion rate should then be gradually reduced until it matches plasma fluid losses.

11. The adequacy of fluid repletion should be assessed by serial determination of hematocrit, blood pressure, pulse, and urine output. Patients with shock on presentation should initially have vital signs measured at least every 30 minutes and hematocrit measured every two to four hours.

12. Narrowing of the pulse pressure is an indication of hypovolemia in children even with a normal systolic blood pressure.

13. Normalization of the hematocrit is an important goal of early fluid repletion

14. Patients can develop shock for one to two days after initial fluid resuscitation, which represents the period of increased vascular permeability in DHF.

15. Most patients who present for medical attention before profound shock develops and who receive appropriate fluid therapy will recover quickly.

16. Usually no more than 48 hours of intravenous fluid therapy are required.

17. Discharge from the hospital is appropriate when patients have been afebrile for at least 24 hours and have normal oral intake, urine output, and hematocrit.