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Dr K K Aggarwal

You are the Temple of God and the Spirit of the God Dwells in You

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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This sutra from the Bible reflects the union between the spirit and the soul. The ‘Spirit’ represents the Parmatama or the Brahman and ‘You’ represents the individualized spirit or the Soul (Jivatama).

A temple is a place of worship and also the place where God resides. Every human being represents a temple (place of worship) where God exists (one’s soul) and this soul is nothing but the essence of God (the spirit).

One should treat every individual in the same manner as the same spirit dwells in every human being. The soul is also the reflection of individual’s past and present karmic expressions. Most people are in the habit of looking and searching for God in artificial temples, gurudwaras and churches, not realizing that the same God is present within us, provided we undertake the internal journey to look for Him.

He is present in between thoughts in the silent zone and can be approached by adopting any of the three pathways: Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Gyana (Gnana) Yoga.

Doing selfless work with detachment to its results, working with the principles of duty, devotion and discipline and/or regularly doing Primordial Sound Meditation or other types of meditations can help one reach the stage of self-realization or meeting one’s true self. Once there, one can have all the happiness in life.

Should doctors detach themselves?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In dealing with patients, the traditional Patient-Doctor relationship model has been that doctor should remain cool, calm and collected at all times.The doctor’s approach needs to be strictly scientific, logical, objective, methodical precise and dispassionate. This has been the model since the era of William Osler, the father of modern medicine. The term used is imperturbability, which means coolness and presence of mind under all circumstances.

Osler said a rare and precious gift to doctor is right of detachment. The right of detachment insulates doctors and protects them from powerful emotions that patients display in their presence like anger, frustration, grief, rage and bewilderment. It also insulates patients from the rolling emotions that doctors may at times feel towards them.

However, a detached attitude also insulates doctors from empathizing with patients. A detached doctor may talk in a language that is over patient’s head.

Detachment is not like a light switch that you can turn on and off to suit the situation. Detachment, as a practice, cannot be in isolation if it becomes your personal style of distracting from the world; it may not be just for the patients but also from your colleague, family friends and even yourself.

I recall when I joined my hospital, the first lesson given to me by my boss was not to get unduly attached with patients. As part of etiquettes, we were taught not to socialize with patients. Even today, the new American Guidelines talk that doctors should not socialize with their patients on social media including Facebook. Even doctors are human beings and their personal life should not be known to the patients. As far as lawsuits are concerned, it is equally true that known patients file a lawsuit much more than unknown people because over a period of time they know your weakness. One should learn to empathize with the patients and yet be detached from its results. Doctors who follow Bhagawad Gita understand this concept very well.