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Dr K K Aggarwal

Shiksha and sabhyata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.

One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners, which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I-ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.

As students, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings from them by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher-student relationship of today.

Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Shiksha and Sabhyata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Shiksha and Sabhyata

Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.

One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars or princes were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I-ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.

When we were students, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher-student relationship of today.

Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

Namkaran Sanskar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In India, a person is identified by his/her name, which usually is a reflection of his/her own family. It may contain not only your maiden name but also the name of your father and your surname/caste.

When you are born, you are usually given your special name, which you carry throughout your life unless it is changed for a specific purpose. For example, the surname may change after marriage or the in-laws may change the name, specifically, for a girl.

Artists often change their names to those which may reflect their profession. A classic example is Rajesh Khanna, who changed his name from Jatin to Rajesh, which was easier for the public to recall.

A name for a baby is chosen on any of the following grounds:

  • The priest as per the horoscope decides the sound present in the universe and that Akshar (Alphabet) is given to the family to pick up a name starting with that Akshar.
  • Sometimes, the name of the baby may be chosen depending upon the auspiciousness of the day he/she was born, e.g. a baby boy born on Krishna Janmashtami, may be named ‘Krishna’ by the family after Lord Krishna.
  • If the parents have vowed a Mannat to a deity, then they may name their child after one of the many names of that deity. For example, if parents have taken a Mannat from Vaishno Devi, their baby girl may be named for one of the forms of Goddess Durga or Parvati.
  • People may also choose similar names for their children, e.g. Ramesh, Mahesh, and Suresh.
  • People may also keep the name of the child in the form of known pairs. If the name of the first child is Luv, the parents may like to name the second child as Kush, especially when the parents have twins. Other examples are Karan Arjun, Sita and Gita etc.
  • Sometimes, parents name their child after their favorite celebrity. For example, if someone is a big fan of Sachin Tendulkar, he may name his child Sachin. Sachin himself was named after the noted Hindi film music director Sachin Dev Burman by his father, who was a great fan of SD Burman.

Name has a lot of significance as Akshar in Sanskrit has a vibration and if that positive vibration matches with the vibrations of universe at the time of your birth, it helps in healing.

Normally, it is expected that you live up to your name. For example, if your name is Durga, you are expected to know all about Ma Durga and try to adopt characteristics of Durga.

Therefore, everyone is expected to know the literal meaning of his or her name and try to follow a lifestyle that is consistent with your name. For example, if you are named Ram, you are not expected to act like Ravana.

Namkaran Sanskar or the naming ceremony is a complete ceremony and is one of the 16 sanskars. It is both a social and legal necessity. As the naming process creates a bond between the child and the rest of the community, it is considered auspicious.

Some people name their child before he/she is born but a Namkaran Sanskar is usually performed on the 12th day after birth but it may vary from religion to religion and custom to custom. The formal ritual involves a Namkaran puja, which is held at their home or a temple where the priest offers prayers to all the Gods, Navagrihas, five elements, Agni and the ancestors. The horoscope of a child is made and is placed in front of the idol of the deity for blessings. With the baby in the lap of the father, the chosen name of the child is whispered in the right ear.

Some people name the child on the 101st day of the birth; while some choose the first birthday to name their child.

The name of the child also entails certain etiquettes as it reflects a person. You cannot take the name of a person with disrespect. If you abuse a name it means you have abused a person.

Shiksha and Sabhyata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Health Care - Ask Dr KK | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Shiksha and Sabhyata

Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.
One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars or princes were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I-ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.
When we were students, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher-student relationship of today.
Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

Namkaran Sanskar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Namkaran Sanskar

In India, a person is identified by his/her name, which usually is a reflection of his/her own family. It may contain not only your maiden name but also the name of your father and your surname/caste.

When you are born, you are usually given your special name, which you carry throughout your life unless it is changed for a specific purpose. For example, the surname may change after marriage or the in–laws may change your name, specifically, when you are a girl.

Artists often change their names to those which may reflect their profession. A classical example is Rajesh Khanna, who changed his name from Jatin to Rajesh, which was easier for the public to recall.

A name for a baby is chosen on any of the following grounds:

1. The priest, as per the horoscope, decides the sound present in the universe and that Akshar (Alphabet) is given to the family to choose a name beginning with that Akshar.

2. Sometimes, the name of the baby may be chosen depending upon the auspiciousness of the day he/she was born, e.g. a baby body born on Krishna Janmashtami, may be named ‘Krishna’ by the family after Lord Krishna.

3. If the parents have vowed a Mannat to a deity, then they may name their child after one of the many names of that deity. For example, if parents have taken a Mannat from Vaishno Devi, their baby girl may be named as one of the forms of Goddess Durga or Parvati.

4. People may also choose similar names for their children, e.g. Ramesh, Mahesh and Suresh.

5. People may also keep the name of the child in the form of known pairs. If the name of the first child is Luv, the parents may like to name the second child as Kush, especially when the parents have twins. Other examples are Karan Arjun, Sita and Gita etc.

6. Sometimes, parents name their child after their favorite celebrity. For example, if someone is a big fan of Sachin Tendulkar, he may name his child Sachin. Sachin Tendulkar himself was named after the noted Hindi film music director Sachin Dev Burman by his father, who was a great fan of SD Burman.

Name has a lot of significance as Akshar in Sanskrit has a vibration and if that positive vibration matches with the vibrations of universe at the time of your birth, it helps in healing.

Normally, it is expected that you live up to your name. For example, if your name is Durga, you are expected to know all about Maa Durga and try to adopt characteristics of Durga.

Therefore, everyone is expected to know the literal meaning of his or her name and try to follow a lifestyle that is consistent with your name. For example, if you are named Ram, you are not expected to act like Ravana.

Namkaran Sanskar or the naming ceremony is a complete ceremony and is one of the 16 sanskars. It is both a social and legal necessity. As the naming process creates a bond between the child and the rest of the community, it is considered auspicious.

Some people name their child before he/she is born but a Namkaran Sanskar is usually performed on the 12th day after birth but it may vary from religion to religion and custom to custom.

The formal ritual involves a Namkaran puja, which is held at their home or a temple where the priest offers prayers to all the Gods, Navagrihas, five elements, Agni and the ancestors. The horoscope of a child is made and is placed in front of the idol of the deity for blessings. With the baby in the lap of the father, the chosen name of the child is whispered in the right ear.

Some people name child on the 101st day of the birth and still some others choose the first birthday to name their child.

The name of the child also entails certain etiquettes as it reflects a person. You cannot take the name of a person with disrespect. If you abuse a name it means you have abused a person.

Shiksha and Sabhyata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Shiksha and Sabhyata

Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.

One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars or princes were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I–ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.

In our student days, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher–student relationship of today.

Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

Namkaran Sanskar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Namkaran Sanskar

In India, a person is identified by his/her name, which usually is a reflection of his/her own family. It may contain not only your maiden name but also the name of your father and your surname/caste.

When you are born, you are usually given your special name, which you carry throughout your life unless it is changed for a specific purpose. For example, the surname may change after marriage or the in–laws may change your name, specifically, when you are a girl.

Artists often change their names to those which may reflect their profession. A classical example is Rajesh Khanna, who changed his name from Jatin to Rajesh, which was easier for the public to recall.

A name for a baby is chosen on any of the following grounds:

1. The priest as per the horoscope decides the sound present in the universe and that Akshar (Alphabet) is given to the family to pick up a name starting with that Akshar.

2. Sometimes, the name of the baby may be chosen depending upon the auspiciousness of the day he/she was born, e.g. a baby body born on Krishna Janmashtami, may be named ‘Krishna’ by the family after Lord Krishna.

3. If the parents have vowed a Mannat to a deity, then they may name their child after one of the many names of that deity. For example, if parents have taken a Mannat from Vaishno Devi, their baby girl may be named as one of the forms of Goddess Durga or Parvati.

4. People may also choose similar names for their children, e.g. Ramesh, Mahesh, and Suresh.

5. People may also keep the name of the child in the form of known pairs. If the name of the first child is Luv, the parents may like to name the second child as Kush, especially when the parents have twins. Other examples are Karan Arjun, Sita and Gita etc.

6. Sometimes, parents name their child after their favorite celebrity. For example, if someone is a big fan of Sachin Tendulkar, he may name his child Sachin. Sachin himself was named after the noted Hindi film music director Sachin Dev Burman by his father, who was a great fan of SD Burman.

Name has a lot of significance as Akshar in Sanskrit has a vibration and if that positive vibration matches with the vibrations of universe at the time of your birth, it helps in healing.

Normally, it is expected that you live up to your name. For example, if your name is Durga, you are expected to know all about Maa Durga and try to adopt characteristics of Durga.

Therefore, everyone is expected to know the literal meaning of his or her name and try to follow a lifestyle that is consistent with your name. For example, if you are named Ram, you are not expected to act like Ravana.

Namkaran Sanskar or the naming ceremony is a complete ceremony and is one of the 16 samskars. It is both a social and legal necessity. As the naming process creates a bond between the child and the rest of the community, it is considered auspicious.

Some people name their child before he/she is born but a Namkaran Sanskar is usually performed on the 12th day after birth but it may vary from religion to religion and custom to custom. The formal ritual involves a Namkaran puja, which is held at their home or a temple where the priest offers prayers to all the Gods, Navagrihas, five elements, Agni and the ancestors. The horoscope of a child is made and is placed in front of the idol of the deity for blessings. With the baby in the lap of the father, the chosen name of the child is whispered in the right ear.

Some people name child on the 101st day of the birth and still some others choose the first birthday to name their child.

The name of the child also entails certain etiquettes as it reflects a person. You cannot take the name of a person with disrespect. If you abuse a name it means you have abused a person.

Shiksha and Sabhyata

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Shiksha and Sabhyata

Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.

One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars or princes were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I–ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.

In our student days, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher–student relationship of today.

Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

Why you remove shoes before entering temple?

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There are etiquettes that when you enter a worship area in all religions, you are required to take off your shoes before you enter any spiritual place. It is better to remove them in your car or a vehicle or give to an authorized shoe keeper otherwise all the time; the shoes will remain in your mind when you are visiting the temple.

The Thai etiquettes involve before you visit a Thai temple, you remove shoes, hats and sun glasses. You also turn off your mobile phones and lower your voice. In our Gurudwaras, you are supposed to remove your shoes and cover your head before you enter the holy place.

A house is also considered a temple, therefore, when you enter your house, you take off your shoes at the gate.

Removing the shoes has both medical and spiritual reasoning. The medical reasoning is that  your shoes invariably carry infections and dirt from outside and can infect both the home and temple atmosphere. It can end up into a disease. In a temple where large number of people visit, it is important to provide a safe and hygienic environment.

Removing shoes also has a spiritual reasoning. In mythology shoes represent your perception towards dirt and dirt in mythology basically means mental dirt. In any Shiv temple, Nandi is always worshipped outside the temple. Nandi represents sexual desires which mean that you should never enter a holy place with sexual desires in. That is the reason why pilgrimage places are never used for honeymoon. Similarly, removing your shoes means that before entering a temple, you take away your negative thoughts. You cannot enter a temple under anger, aggressiveness, cynical behavior or anger or hostile behavior. You are not supposed to abuse inside a temple.

It is said that even if you are angry, the temple atmosphere still makes you calm. Removing your shoes

outside temple means a type of Pratiyahar as mentioned in the Yoga Sutra Patanjali which is start of a new journey by keeping your negative thoughts out and then entering the temple premises with a positive state of mind.

Removing your shoes also makes you bend which also teaches you to remember that to acquire inner happiness, you need to learn to bend first. In a temple, you learn to bend which you do by touching your head on the floor or on the Lotus Feet of the God.

Ideally, you are not only required to remove the shoes but also wash your feet. Washing of feet is essential in Islam which again is both for physical hygiene as well as in Vedic terms washing of feet means removing your mental negativity by starting thinking positive. Here flow of water basically means a continuous flow of positive thoughts. Ganga or any holy water in mythology depicts flow of positive thoughts.