Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

The Science behind eating Khichdi in Paush Month

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on The Science behind eating Khichdi in Paush Month

  • It is wet winter full of fog and smog.
  • From Ayurveda point of view, Kapha is aggravating, Vata is accumulating and Pitta is at its minimum.
  • The food intake should therefore contain Kapha-pacifying foods, which are light, easily digestible, hot, warm and Pitta increasing, so that they can increase the digestive fire to digest.
  • One of the main foods is eating Khichidi or a mix of brown rice and lentils /moong daal/ or bajara khichd
  • Khichdi or lentil rice mix is light to eat and digest.
  • In Allopathy terms when we eat proteins it must contain all essential amino acids. Normally foods from animal sources, such as meat, eggs and dairy products, are complete proteins. Soy and quinoa are the only two plant-based protein sources that provide complete protein. Incomplete protein sources lack one or more of the essential amino acids.

The essential amino acid deficit of one plant food can be overcome by combining it with a complementary plant food that provides adequate amounts of the limited essential amino acid.

As an example, grains (rice) are low in the essential amino acid lysine and high in methionine, whereas legumes (lentils, pulses, beans) are low in methionine and high in lysine. Peanuts are another complementary protein for rice.

Pairing complete proteins, such as milk, soya, meat, fish or eggs with incomplete proteins like brown rice also provides complete protein. Rice and dal is therefore eaten with curd as a tradition.

You don’t need to consume complementary proteins at the same meal, but you do need to consume them in the same day. The adequacy of protein intake is determined by the total quantity of protein and amino acids from the variety of foods consumed during the day.

  • Khichidi gives energy. All Gods are worshipped in this season with this food. In khichidi Rice and pulses should be in ratio of 1:2.
  • Bajra khichdi is another favorite food item in this month. It is health-friendly as it has complex non refined carbs. To balance it is served with desi ghee to take away its dry effect.
  • To make it equivalent to 56 bhog of winter, heeng, saunth (garam masala has less saunth), peepali, mirch, ajwain, javitri and jaiphal are added.
  • Bajra khichidi is usually eaten with garlic (counters constipation), less butter/ghee.
  • It is also eaten with garlic chatni, or amla chatni ( both are good for the heart)
  • In constipation: eat khichdi with curd, salad, white butter, ghee

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Tips to prevent anemia from becoming severe during pregnancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent anemia from becoming severe during pregnancy

  1. Eat iron-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, dried beans and fortified grains. The form of iron in meat products, called heme, is more easily absorbed than the iron in vegetables. If you are anemic and you ordinarily eat meat, increasing the amount of meat you consume is the easiest way to increase the iron your body receives.
  2. Eat foods high in folic acid, such as dried beans, dark green leafy vegetables, wheat germ and orange juice.
  3. Eat vitamin C-rich foods such as citrus fruits and fresh, raw vegetables.
  4. Cook in cast iron pots as this can add up to 80% more iron to your food.
  5. Take your prenatal multivitamin and mineral pill which contains extra folate.

Think differently in mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Think differently in mythology

• Lord Ganesha with the elephant’s head depicts that one should use their wisdom before taking any decision.

• Vishnu’s first incarnation, fish, symbolizes learning to swim in the opposite direction.

• Brahma’s five heads denotes using all your five senses before taking any decision.

• Shiva’s third eye means to think differently in difficulties.

• Ravan’s ten heads mean using your ten senses/emotions before taking any decision. But, Ravan used them for negative forces.

• Maha Mrityunjaya mantra begins as we worship the three-eyed Shiva.

• Gayatri mantra means that one should ask the heart to direct the intellect to take the right decision. The 3H philosophy is linked to the same. The first H is ask the head for options; second H is to ask the heart to choose one of the options and the third H means to order the hand to do the action

You should be not only positive, different but also persistent. In ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu, the first one was a Machhli (fish) which indicates to be different in life. The second incarnation is tortoise which indicates that you should be different but learn to withdraw when the need arises. The third is a boar which indicates persistence.

The mantra of a successful life is to be positively different and persistent and yet learn to withdraw when the situation arises.

The medicinal use of chocolate has a long history in North America dating back to the 16th century. From Mesoamerican Codices and European Treatises scholars have determined that for hundreds of years the beverage called chocolate was administered to the sick and prescribed homeopathically to prevent illness.

Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and it lowers the blood pressure. Blood pressure lowering effect was shown in a Novel Study by Al-Safi SA and group from Texas Woman’s University, College of Nursing in Jordan in 2011.

The data that plant sterols combined with dark chocolate reduces bad LDL cholesterol was published in 2008 in the journal

A Harvard study published in 2011 in Clinical Nutrition by Diousse L and group from Brigham and Women’s Hospital has shown that dark chocolate consumption is inversely associated with prevalence of coronary heart disease.

Dark chocolate improves endothelial functions and the platelet function was shown by Hermann F and group in 2006 in the Journal Heart.

Franco OH and group from Erasmus MC University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Netherlands in 2004 wrote in British Medical Journal that the polymeal concept is a more natural, safer, and probably tastier than the Polypill strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease by more than 75%. The evidence based recipe included wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits, vegetables, garlic, and almonds.

Another study published in 2007 in Heart Advis has shown that small dietary changes yield big blood pressure benefits. One should limit sodium, eat more veggies, and add modest amounts of soy nuts and dark chocolate to improve the heart health.

In 2009 Sirtori CR and group from University of Milano, Italy wrote in Nutr Res Rev journal that dark chocolate is gaining much attention as a functional food for its multifunctional activities, useful both for the prevention of dyslipidemia as well as hypertension.

Loffredo L and group from I Clinica Medica, Viale del Policlinico Italy has shown in the journal Heart in 2011 that the acute effects of dark chocolate in smokers are due to NOX2-mediated arterial dysfunction. Cocoa enhances artery dilatation by lowering of NOX2 activation as assessed by blood levels of soluble NOX2 derived peptide.