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Dr K K Aggarwal

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  • Sit on a straight–backed chair or cross–legged on the floor.
  • Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  • Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and ideas.
  • Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Direct all your energy towards the soul and not the ego

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The epic Mahabharata can also be understood as a science of inner Mahabharata happening in everybody’s mind.

Lord Krishna symbolizes the consciousness and the five Pandavas, the five positive qualities of a person namely, righteousness (Yudhishthir), focus (Arjuna), power to fight injustice (Bheem), helping others (Sahdev) and learning to be neutral in difficult situations (Nakul). Panchali indicates the five senses, which can only be controlled when these five forces are together.

Dhritarashtra symbolizes ignorance, Duhshasan negative ruling quality (dusht while ruling) and Duryodhana (dusht in yudh) one who is not balanced in war.

Conscious-based decisions need to be taken to kill the negativity in the mind. Every action, if directed towards the consciousness or the soul, is the right action. To kill all the 100 Kauravas (the 100 negative tendencies a person can have) controlled by Duryodhan and Duhshasan along with Shakuni (the negative power of cunningness), positive qualities have to be redirected towards consciousness and then take right decisions.

The five Pandavas (positive qualities) made soul (Lord Krishna) as their point of reference (Sarthi) and won over the evils (Kauravas).

Bhishma Pitamah, Karna and Dronacharya, individually all had winning powers; but, they all supported negative thoughts and made Duryodhana as their point of reference and ultimately had to die.

The message is very clear, if one directs his or her positive powers towards ego as the reference point in long run, they will be of no use and, in fact, will be responsible for one’s destruction.

Ravana too was a great scholar but he directed all his energies and powers towards his ego and ended up in misery.

Therefore, one should cultivate a positive mental attitude, positive thoughts instead of directing them towards desire, attachment or ego and should direct them to soul/consciousness for a positive outcome.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own)

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
  2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  3. Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations and ideas.
  4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  1. Sit on a straight–backed chair or cross–legged on the floor.
  2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  3. Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and ideas.
  4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again

  (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  • Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
  • Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  • Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and ideas.
  • Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.
(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Focus only on upper blood pressure if over 50 years of age

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Focus only on upper blood pressure if over 50 years of age

For patients aged over 50, doctors only need to monitor the upper systolic blood pressure, and can ignore the lower diastolic blood pressure reading. As per a report published in the journal The Lancet, patients are not getting their systolic blood pressures adequately controlled because there is such an emphasis on diastolic pressure. The fact is that people over the age of 50 probably do not even need to measure diastolic – it’s only the systolic blood pressure that should be the focus.

Generally, systolic blood pressure continues to increase with age, while diastolic pressure starts to drop after age 50, which is the same time when cardiovascular risk begins to rise. Therefore, there is an increased prevalence of systolic hypertension past age 50, whereas diastolic hypertension is practically nonexistent. Rising systolic pressure is the most significant factor in causing stroke and heart disease.

For people under 50, the scenario may be different. About 40 percent of adults under 40 years of age have diastolic hypertension, and about a third of those between 40 and 50 have the problem. For these patients, a continued emphasis on both systolic and diastolic blood pressures is needed. However, controlling systolic blood pressure, even among these younger patients, almost always results in adequate control of diastolic blood pressure, too. For people 50 or older, systolic pressure is high if it is 140 mmHg or above.

Focus on the whole diet and not just certain foods

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A study published in the medical journal Diabetes Care has highlighted the importance of the whole diet rather than focusing on certain foods or food groups that might be beneficial. A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables (leafy green), nuts, and low–fat dairy may help people lower their risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% over 5 years than those who ate the lowest amounts of these foods. Also, a diet which contains high amounts of red meat, high–fat dairy and refined grains like white bread may boost the odds of diabetes development by 18%. In contrast, adults whose diets were high in red meat, high–fat dairy, refined grains like white bread, plus beans and tomatoes, saw their diabetes risk go up by 18% as a group.

Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and it is well–known that maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise reduces the risk of developing the disease. Diet affects diabetes risk independent of a person’s weight