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Dr K K Aggarwal

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Make reading food labels a habit.Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods do not taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it is critical to check labels.
  2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.
  3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example, garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.
  4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt.
  5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.

What do you mean by ‘food is Brahman’?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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‘Food is Brahman’ is a saying from the Vedic Upanishad and Bhagavad Gita. Brahma is consciousness, therefore, food is consciousness. Though the traditional Vedic teaching has been that consciousness is present in everything and yet only food is considered Brahman. We never say that stone is Brahman nor dog is Brahman. As per Chandogya Upanishad (6.15.1) at the time of death, our Vak Vritti (motor senses) merges into Karm Indriyas or manovritti (sensory senses, mind, intellect, ego and memory) and that now merges with Prana (Udana Vayu) and finally this merges into Tejas which leaves the body to merge into the Sat. Vak Vritti, Manovritti and Prana Vritti, in the form of vibrations in the atmosphere, come back through rain and are taken by the plants to become plant consciousness. Therefore, as per Chandogya Upanishad, the consciousness of the Brahman moves from human to plants and plants to human. The plant food once eaten and absorbed enters into the human body and ultimately makes Prana, Tejas, Ojas, Sperms and Ova. Through Sperm and Ova, it enters into the next life. If this theory is correct, then food makes the consciousness and consciousness makes food. This also further proves that vegetarian food, as it is full of Brahman creating a satvik mind and takes one towards spirituality. The Tamsik food which is dead and devoid of consciousness does not lead to a healthy mind as it may produce Mal (waste) or make flesh but will not make essence. As per Chandogya Upanishad, fiery food makes Karma Indriyas, earthy food makes Gnan Indriyas and Water in food makes Prana. It further emphasizes on the fact that one should eat freshly cut fruits and vegetables as far as possible as life or consciousness in them can only stay for some time (as per Jainism up to 48 minutes).

Diet and Aging: Gaining a Nutritional Edge

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Choose fruits and vegetables wisely

• Eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

• When filling your plate with fruits and vegetables, choose from a full color palette.

• For even more health benefits, aim for nine servings a day. To get there, choose vegetable soups and vegetable or fruit salads. Sprinkle fruit on breakfast cereal, and select it for snacks or as a sweet end note after meals. Choose fats wisely

• Whenever possible, use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils. Avoid trans fats entirely. Limit saturated fats to less than 7% of daily calories and total fat to 20% to 30% of daily calories.

• If you don’t have coronary artery disease, the American Heart Association recommends eating foods rich in omega–3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout, or mackerel, twice weekly. If you have documented coronary artery disease, consume roughly 1 gram a day of EPA or DHA from oily fish and supplements if your doctor advises this. Choose carbohydrates wisely

• Choose whole–grain foods over those made with refined grains, such as white bread. Look beyond popular choices like whole oats and brown rice to lesser–known whole grains like barley, bulgur, kasha and quinoa. Limit your intake of white potatoes. Choosing protein wisely

• Emphasize plant sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and grains, to help you bypass unhealthy fats predominant in animal sources. Enjoying a wide variety of vegetables and eating beans and grains helps you get a full complement of amino acids over the course of a week. Shy away from protein sources high in saturated fat. Favor fish and well–trimmed poultry. If you do eat beef, pick lean cuts.

• Don’t char or overcook meat, poultry, or fish, it causes a buildup of carcinogens. Cutting off fat, which causes flames to flare on the grill, can help avoid charring; try gently sautéing, steaming, or braising these foods in liquid instead. Grilling vegetables is safe, however.

5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on 5 tips to reduce salt in your diet

1. Make reading food labels a habit. Sodium content is always listed on food labels. Sodium content can vary from brand to brand, so compare and choose the lowest sodium product. Certain foods do not taste particularly salty but are actually high in sodium, such as cottage cheese, so it is critical to check labels.

2. Stick to fresh meats, fruits and vegetables rather than their packaged counterparts, which tend to be higher in sodium.

3. Avoid spices and seasonings that contain added sodium, for example, garlic salt. Choose garlic powder instead.

4. Many restaurants list the sodium content of their products on their websites, so do your homework before dining out. Also, you can request that your food be prepared without any added salt.

5. Try to spread your sodium intake out throughout the day; it’s easier on your kidneys than eating lots of salt all at once.

Why should we eat seasonal fruits and vegetables?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Why should we eat seasonal fruits and vegetables?

God will grow only those fruits and vegetables, which are necessary in that season in that particular location.  For example, during summer, the body requires more liquids and regular flushing of the kidney because of extreme heat so that dehydration does not damage kidney.  To prevent this, nature produces vegetables and fruits in this season that are juicier and increase urination.

All summer fruits like mango, lichi, watermelon, musk melon, wood apple (bel), etc. are juicy fruits. All vegetables grown in summer such as bottle gourd (ghiya), snake gourd (torai), apple gourd (tinda) grow on creepers and they all have a mild diuretic action.

In summer, where the humidity is not so high like in Delhi, one need not take coconut water, which is only required as a treatment of humidity-related diseases.  Therefore, nature grows coconuts only in the coastal  areas.