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Dr K K Aggarwal

Search for happiness in the present moment

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Happiness should not be considered as being synonymous with pleasure. Pleasure is transient and is always associated with pain later on. Any transient addiction to any of the five senses will either lead to pleasure or pain. Pleasure leads to attachment resulting in more intense and greater desires, and if these are not fulfilled, they cause pain, which manifests as anger, irritability or even a physical disease. This type of transient pleasure is chosen by the individuals who attach themselves not only to the actions, but also to its results.

The soul, which is an energized field of information and energy, is controlled by the person’s action, memory and desire. With every action, a memory is created which either gets stored or is recirculated again as an action. If one does not control the desires, the recurrent actions may cause more problems than happiness.

True happiness, on the other hand, is internal happiness or the happiness of the soul or of the consciousness. It is often said, “You are what you eat, you are what you think and you are what you do.” Hence, your own internal happiness will vary with what you eat, think, and do.

Being in the present moment leads to true happiness. If one laments about the past or keeps fearing about the future all the time, you will never be able to live in the present. Not living in the present is bound to cause unhappiness. One should learn to live and enjoy the present, which can only be done by attaching oneself to the actions and not to its results.

Doing one’s duty with devotion and discipline also helps one to remain in the present. Performing good action is important, but it is equally important to maintain the purity of the mind at the same time. Because any intention in the thought creates the same chemical reaction as when the actual deed is done, abusing a person in thought is the same as abusing him in person. Cultivating positive actions in day–to–day life, like, giving or sharing etc., helps in acquiring internal happiness.

Thoughts ultimately get metabolized into various chemicals and hormones changing the internal biochemistry of the person; hence, by thinking about cancer all the time, one can actually induce it over a period of time. And similarly, cancers can be cured by thinking positive over a period of time.

Internal happiness gives a deep feeling of satisfaction and is not associated with any transient chemical changes which are generally associated with bodily pleasure activities. People who are internally happy are always contented and are devoid of jealousy, anger, irritability, greed and ego.

One should learn to disassociate from, both, external pain as well as pleasure, and only then can one acquire true internal happiness

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Search for Happiness in the Present Moment

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Search for Happiness in the Present Moment

Happiness should not be considered as being synonymous with pleasure. Pleasure is transient and is always associated with pain later on. Any transient addiction to any of the five senses will either lead to pleasure or pain. Pleasure leads to attachment resulting in more intense and greater desires, and if these are not fulfilled, they cause pain, which manifests as anger, irritability or even a physical disease. This type of transient pleasure is chosen by the individuals who attach themselves not only to the actions, but also to its results.

The soul, which is an energized field of information and energy, is controlled by the person’s action, memory and desire. With every action, a memory is created which either gets stored or is recirculated again as an action. If one does not control the desires, the recurrent actions may cause more problems than happiness.

True happiness, on the other hand, is internal happiness or the happiness of the soul or of the consciousness. It is often said, “You are what you eat, you are what you think and you are what you do.” Hence, your own internal happiness will vary with what you eat, think, and do.

Being in the present moment leads to true happiness. If one laments about the past or keeps fearing about the future all the time, you will never be able to live in the present. Not living in the present is bound to cause unhappiness. One should learn to live and enjoy the present, which can only be done by attaching oneself to the actions and not to its results.

Doing one’s duty with devotion and discipline also helps one to remain in the present. Performing good action is important, but it is equally important to maintain the purity of the mind at the same time. Because any intention in the thought creates the same chemical reaction as when the actual deed is done, abusing a person in thought is the same as abusing him in person. Cultivating positive actions in day–to–day life, like, giving or sharing etc., helps in acquiring internal happiness.

Thoughts ultimately get metabolized into various chemicals and hormones changing the internal biochemistry of the person; hence, by thinking about cancer all the time, one can actually induce it over a period of time. And similarly, cancers can be cured by thinking positive over a period of time.

Internal happiness gives a deep feeling of satisfaction and is not associated with any transient chemical changes which are generally associated with bodily pleasure activities. People who are internally happy are always contented and are devoid of jealousy, anger, irritability, greed and ego.

One should learn to disassociate from, both, external pain as well as pleasure, and only then can one acquire true internal happiness

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Rome was not built in a day

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Rome was not built in a day

With ‘Abhyas’ or constant practice, one can conquer all the obstacles in life. The sutra “Rome was not built in a day” has a deep spiritual meaning. In the path for self–realization, regular practice is the principle behind all paths: Bhakti, Karma or the Gnana marg. Persistence is the key in any spiritual attainment.

Regular hard work can also change one’s past bad karmic actions. All karmas irrespective of their nature should be converted into good karmas. This can be better understood by the following example. While painting a red colored wall with green paint with the intention to make it green, it first gets converted into yellow color. But repeated painting with green will ultimately make it green.

The red color here can be compared to bad past karmas and green color to good present karmas. By doing positive activities time and again, one can dissolve the impressions of the bad actions done in the past. To start with, there may be a reaction from the others (which is equivalent to the yellow color in the above example) but if the person does not lose his confidence at that moment and continues with his good present karmas, he will ultimately end up in changing his bad past converting it into a good present and a better future. This requires continuous and repeated practice.

Self–realization and meditation are difficult processes. They involve attaining a thoughtless state, in other words, a state of experiencing the silence. All the paths for self realization are difficult, but with regular practice, one can achieve it without any problem. The path of Bhakti is often considered the path of choice for the majority of people as it is the easiest path to follow. The path of Bhakti involves a triad of “duty, devotion and discipline”. But any duty, devotion or discipline done only for a short time will not end in success, unless it is practiced over a longer period of time.

A classical example can be seen in Islam. Ramadan is a classical example of hard work leading to an atmosphere of brotherhood, love, compassion and truthfulness with significant reduction in negativity amongst the community. For one month, all the Muslims participate in a self-training program to reduce negativity and build positivity in their lives. During this month they are prohibited from indulging in sexual activities, entering into marriage ceremonies, and are encouraged to make endeavors towards self realization. The classical discipline to be maintained is fasting. Fasting here does not mean only fasting food or water alone. It also means controlling negative thinking, negative speech, and indulging in any negative action.

The Bhagavad Gita has described the five gateways to hell as attachment, desire, anger, greed and ego. Controlling them requires practice. A month of observance of controlling one’s five senses and not indulging in the five gateways of hell trains one enough to make these parameters a part of one’s life. The positive attitude practiced over one month tends to stitch it in one’s consciousness, and ultimately in a majority, becomes a part of one’s life.

There is a similar practice in Hindu religion during “Navratras”, but unfortunately, not all people observe this as dedicatedly as the Muslims.

Apart from the internal journey to self–realization, hard work plays a role even in day–to–day outer journeys be it married life, family life, social life or office life.

Hard work is the key to success, provided one controls the above five gateways to hell and practices the triad of non–expectation, detachment and being non–judgmental. Attaching oneself with actions but detaching from the results is the key to both internal as well as external success.