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Dr K K Aggarwal

Hands-only CPR Guidelines

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Bystanders should initiate compression-only CPR 10.
  2. Chest compression should be done at the rate of 100–120 per minute (updated from “at least” 100 per minute).
  3. Compression depth should be 2–2.5 inches (upper limit added) but no more than 6 cm.
  4. Compression time should be maximized.
  5. After each compression allow the chest to recoil completely and minimize interruptions in compressions.
  6. Feedback devices may be used to optimize compression rate and depth.
  7. The bystander who is trained and able should assess the collapsed victim rapidly to determine if the victim is unresponsive and not breathing normally and then immediately alert the emergency services.
  8. The victim who is unresponsive and not breathing normally is in cardiac arrest and requires CPR.
  9. The emergency medical dispatcher plays an important role in the early diagnosis of cardiac arrest, the provision of dispatcher-assisted CPR (also known as telephone CPR), and the location and dispatch of an AED.
  10. Social media may be used to summon rescuers to perform CPR.
  11. Bystanders and emergency medical dispatchers should be suspicious of cardiac arrest in any patient presenting with seizures and should carefully assess whether the victim is breathing normally.
  12. CPR providers should perform chest compressions for all victims in cardiac arrest.
  13. CPR providers trained and able to perform rescue breaths should combine chest compressions and rescue breaths.
  14. High-quality CPR remains essential to improving outcomes.
  15. When providing rescue breaths/ventilations spend approximately 1 s inflating the chest with sufficient volume to ensure the chest rises visibly. The ratio of chest compressions to ventilations remains 30:2.
  16. Do not interrupt chest compressions for more than 10 s to provide ventilations.
  17. Defibrillation within 3-5 min of collapse can produce survival rates as high as 50-70 %. Early defibrillation can be achieved through CPR providers using public access and on-site AEDs. Public access AED programmes should be actively implemented in public places that have a high density of citizens.
  18. The adult CPR sequence can be used safely in children who are unresponsive and not breathing normally. Chest compression depths in children should be at least one third of the depth of the chest (for infants 4 cm, for children 5 cm).
  19. A foreign body causing severe airway obstruction is a medical emergency and requires prompt treatment with back blows and, if that fails to relieve the obstruction, abdominal thrusts. If the victim becomes unresponsive CPR should be started immediately whilst help is summoned.

Guidelines about Eating

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Malnutrition and wrong dietary habits have been identified as major risk factors for poor health, including heart attacks. Most people below the poverty line have malnutrition due to lack of calories, proteins and vitamins in their food. In the affluent society, overeating or eating wrong food results in overnutrition, a form of malnutrition leading to heart blockages. Here are some guidelines about eating.

• Eat only when you are hungry.

• Do not eat for pleasure, social obligations or emotional satisfaction.

• Eat slowly.

• Eat less; dinner less than lunch.

• Take small mouthfuls each time; chew each morsel well, swallow it and only then take the next morsel.

• Do not eat while watching television, driving a car or watching sports events. The mind is absorbed in these activities and one does not know what and how much one has eaten.

• Do not talk while eating and never enter into heated arguments. The stomach has ears and can listen to your conversation. It will accordingly send signals to the mind and heart.

• Plan and decide in advance what and how much food you will be eating.

• Use low fat or skimmed mild dairy products. Use oils which are liquid at room temperature for cooking.

• Do not take red meat and if you are a non–vegetarian, you may take poultry meat or fish.

Guidelines on Health

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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• Keep your blood cholesterol less than 160 mg%. Even 1% reduction in cholesterol reduces the chances of heart attack by 2%.

• Uncontrolled diabetes and blood pressure can precipitate a heart attack. Keep these under check.

• Eat less, walk more.
• Regular exercise is good for health. The best exercise is ‘walking’, which is a brisker than brisk walking.
• Soya products are good for health. These should form an essential ingredient of the diet.
• Fruits are better than juices.
• Brown rice is better than polished rice and jaggery is better than white sugar.
• Eat high fiber diet.
• Driving and drinking do not go together.
• Pregnant women must not drink. It harms the baby in the womb.
• Get your health check-up done at least once in a year.
• Salt intake should be restricted.
• Avoid APC where A stands for achar, P for papad and C for chutney.

Guidelines about Eating

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Guidelines about Eating

Malnutrition and wrong dietary habits have been identified as major risk factors for ill health, including heart attacks. Most people below the poverty line suffer from malnutrition due to lack of calories, proteins and vitamins in their food. In the affluent society, overeating or eating wrong food results in over nutrition, a form of malnutrition leading to heart blockages. In this context Heart Care Foundation of India has formulated some guidelines about eating (as below).

These include:

  • Eat only when you are hungry.
  • Do not eat for pleasure, social obligations or emotional satisfaction.
  • Eat at a slow pace
  • Eat less; dinner less than lunch.
  • Take small mouthfuls each time, chew each morsel well, swallow it and only then take the next morsel.
  • Do not eat while watching television, driving a car or watching sports events. The mind is absorbed in these activities and one does not know what and how much one has eaten.
  • Do not talk while eating and never enter into heated arguments. The stomach has ears and can listen to your conversation. It will accordingly send signals to the mind and heart.
  • Plan and decide in advance what and how much food you will be eating.
  • Use low fat or skimmed mild dairy products. For cooking, use oils which are liquid at room temperature.
  • Do not take red meat and if you are a non–vegetarian, you may take poultry meat or fish.

Guidelines about Eating

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Guidelines about Eating

Malnutrition and wrong dietary habits have been identified as major risk factors for ill health, including heart attacks. Most people below the poverty line suffer from malnutrition due to lack of calories, proteins and vitamins in their food. In the affluent society, overeating or eating wrong food results in over nutrition, a form of malnutrition leading to heart blockages. Some guidelines include:

  • Eat only when you are hungry.
  • Do not eat for pleasure, social obligations or emotional satisfaction.
  • Eat at a slow pace
  • Eat less; dinner less than lunch.
  • Take small mouthfuls each time, chew each morsel well, swallow it and only then take the next morsel.
  • Do not eat while watching television, driving a car or watching sports events. The mind is absorbed in these activities and one does not know what and how much one has eaten.
  • Do not talk while eating and never enter into heated arguments. The stomach has ears and can listen to your conversation. It will accordingly send signals to the mind and heart.
  • Plan and decide in advance what and how much food you will be eating.
  • Use low fat or skimmed mild dairy products. For cooking, use oils which are liquid at room temperature.
  • Do not take red meat and if you are a non–vegetarian, you may take poultry meat or fish.

Guidelines about Eating

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Guidelines about Eating

Malnutrition and wrong dietary habits have been identified as major risk factors for ill health, including heart attacks. Most people below the poverty line suffer from malnutrition due to lack of calories, proteins and vitamins in their food. In the affluent society, overeating or eating wrong food results in over nutrition, a form of malnutrition leading to heart blockages.

In this context Heart Care Foundation of India has formulated guidelines about eating, said Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India & National Vice President–Elect IMA.

These include:

  • Eat only when you are hungry.
  • Do not eat for pleasure, social obligations or emotional satisfaction.
  • Eat at a slow pace
  • Eat less; dinner less than lunch.
  • Take small mouthfuls each time, chew each morsel well, swallow it and only then take the next morsel.
  • Do not eat while watching television, driving a car or watching sports events. The mind is absorbed in these activities and one does not know what and how much one has eaten.
  • Do not talk while eating and never enter into heated arguments. The stomach has ears and can listen to your conversation. It will accordingly send signals to the mind and heart.
  • Plan and decide in advance what and how much food you will be eating.
  • Use low fat or skimmed mild dairy products. For cooking, use oils which are liquid at room temperature.
  • Do not take red meat and if you are a non–vegetarian, you may take poultry meat or fish.

Malnutrition and wrong dietary habits have been identified as major risk factors for ill health, including heart attacks. Most people below the poverty line suffer from malnutrition due to lack of calories, proteins and vitamins in their food. In the affluent society, overeating or eating wrong food results in over nutrition, a form of malnutrition leading to heart blockages.

In this context Heart Care Foundation of India has formulated guidelines about eating, said Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India & National Vice President-Elect IMA.

These include:

  • Eat only when you are hungry.
  • Do not eat for pleasure, social obligations or emotional satisfaction.
  • Eat at a slow pace
  • Eat less; dinner less than lunch.
  • Take small mouthfuls each time, chew each morsel well, swallow it and only then take the next morsel.
  • Do not eat while watching television, driving a car or watching sports events. The mind is absorbed in these activities and one does not know what and how much one has eaten.
  • Do not talk while eating and never enter into heated arguments. The stomach has ears and can listen to your conversation. It will accordingly send signals to the mind and heart.
  • Plan and decide in advance what and how much food you will be eating.
  • Use low fat or skimmed mild dairy products. For cooking, use oils which are liquid at room temperature.

  • Do not take red meat and if you are a non-vegetarian, you may take poultry meat or fish.