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Dr K K Aggarwal

How to cut back on added sugar

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Many of the “healthy” foods you eat such as energy bars, fruit juices, and flavored yogurt contain sugar. The first step is to read labels carefully and opt for products that are low in sugar.

The American Heart Association recommends keeping calories from added sugars under 100 calories a day (24 grams, or 6 teaspoons) for women and under 150 calories (36 grams, or 9 teaspoons) for men.

Giving up juices and soft drinks can be tough, but here are few ways to get started:

• Make your own. Start with plain sparkling water or tap water. Add a flavoring that strikes your fancy. Here are a few options: an ounce or two of 100% fruit juice; a slice of lemon, lime, orange, or grapefruit; a sprig of fresh mint; a few raspberries.

• No frills coffee and tea. A small dash of sugar or artificial sweetener and milk is okay, but go easy on the extras like flavored syrups and whipped cream.

• Transition to “diet” beverages. Sugar–free sodas and other soft drinks can help you transition away from sugar–sweetened beverages. (HealthBeat)

5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on 5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Check your waistline.
  • Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources; plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph) or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on 5 steps to lower Alzheimer’s risk (HealthBeat)

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Check your waistline.
  • Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin–packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources; plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph) or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

5 Steps To Lower Alzheimer’s Risk [Healthbeat]

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on 5 Steps To Lower Alzheimer’s Risk [Healthbeat]

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Check your waistline.
  • Eat mindfully. Emphasize colorful, vitamin-packed vegetables and fruits; whole grains; fish, lean poultry, tofu, and beans and other legumes as protein sources; plus healthy fats. Cut down on unnecessary calories from sweets, sodas, refined grains like white bread or white rice, unhealthy fats, fried and fast foods, and mindless snacking. Keep a close eye on portion sizes, too.
  • Exercise regularly. Aim for 2½ to 5 hours weekly of brisk walking (at 4 mph). Or try a vigorous exercise like jogging (at 6 mph) for half that time.
  • Keep an eye on important health numbers. In addition to watching your weight and waistline, keep a watch on your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

 

Follow these basic steps, as recommended by HealthBeat, whenever you need to lift something:
• Face the object and position yourself close to it.
• Bend at your knees, not your waist, and squat down as far as you comfortably can.
• As you prepare to lift, tighten your stomach and keep your buttocks tucked in.
• Lift with your legs, not your back muscles.
• Don’t try to lift the object too high — don’t raise a heavy load higher than your waist; keep a light load below shoulder level.
• Keep the object close to you as you lift it.
• If you need to turn to set something down, don’t twist your upper body. Instead, turn your entire body, moving your shoulders, hips, and feet at the same time.
• Ask for help lifting anything that’s too heavy.