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Dr K K Aggarwal

DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk:

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk: The Wall Street Journal reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that DPP–4 inhibitors may not be linked to an increased heart attack risk.

Extreme exercise may not pose danger to heart: The Wall Street Journal reported that a study of Tour de France cyclists found that they had longer lives than the general population and were less likely to die from heart troubles.

Faster heart attack care has not led to better in–hospital survival: USA Today reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that while hospitals have “shaved 16 minutes off the time it takes to get heart attack patients into treatment from 2005–2006 to 2008–2009, reducing that time from 83 minutes to 67 minutes,” investigators “found that the percentage of heart attack patients who die while in the hospital, about 5%, hasn’t changed.”

Gut bacteria may play role in determining weight: The investigators found that mice who received bacteria from the obese twin became fat, while the mice who received bacteria from lean individuals remained lean.

CDC: One in four deaths from cardiovascular disease preventable: USA Today reported currently, there are approximately 800,000 deaths annually in the US from cardiovascular disease, but about 200,000 of these deaths “could be prevented if people made healthy changes including stopping smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, doing more physical activity, eating less salt and managing their high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Losing Job In Last One Year Ups Heart Attack Risk

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Unemployment is a significant risk factor for acute heart attack. The risk fades with joblessness lasting more than a year.

In the Health and Retirement Study, the risk of heart attack for people without work was 1.35 relative to the continuously employed. The risk was especially great among participants with multiple job losses during the nearly 20-year follow-up period. For those with four or more periods of involuntary unemployment, the risk was 1.63.

The study was done by Matthew Dupre, PhD, of DukeUniversity, and published in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.