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Dr K K Aggarwal

Warning signs of worsening heart failure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you have heart failure, call your doctor if you notice any of these signs:

  • Sudden weight gain (2–3 pounds in one day or 5 or more pounds in one week)
  • Extra swelling in the feet or ankles
  • Swelling or pain in the abdomen
  • Shortness of breath not related to exercise
  • Discomfort or trouble breathing when lying flat
  • Waking up feeling short of breath
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Increased fatigue
  • Mental confusion
  • Loss of appetite

Warning signs of worsening heart failure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Warning signs of worsening heart failure

If you have heart failure, call your doctor if you notice any of these signs:

  • Sudden weight gain (2–3 pounds in one day or 5 or more pounds in one week)
  • Extra swelling in the feet or ankles
  • Swelling or pain in the abdomen
  • Shortness of breath not related to exercise
  • Discomfort or trouble breathing when lying flat
  • Waking up feeling short of breath
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Increased fatigue
  • Mental confusion
  • Loss of appetite

New form of heart failure on the rise

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Heart failure is routinely described as progressive loss of ability of the heart to pump blood. But, there is another form of heart failure where the blood–pumping ability of the heart remains near normal. This second form of heart failure is too often overlooked and is just as lethal.

In this condition the heart muscle becomes thickened. The chamber inside gets smaller and the heart is unable to relax to accommodate the blood it needs to pump out. As there is no room for the heart to relax, the blood backs up into the lungs. This kind of anomaly is not picked up by standard measurements of “ejection fraction” – the percentage of blood in the heart that goes out with every beat.

This form of the disease is called “diastolic heart failure” because the problem occurs during the diastole portion of heart activity, as the heart relaxes after a beat. Nearly one–third of these patients have an ejection fraction greater than 50 percent, which is very near normal. However, the death rate for this kind of heart failure matches that of patients with the more common form of heart failure, with more than 20% of all the patients dying within a year. There is a steady increase over 15 years of heart failure with normal or near–normal ejection fraction.

For patients, the symptoms of both types of heart failure are the same: Shortness of breath, difficulty exercising and fluid retention in the body. Physicians cannot make a diagnosis on the basis of symptoms or routine examinations. One has to have an echocardiogram and see the heart pumping and see if the ejection fraction is normal or reduced. Until now, relatively little attention has been paid to diastolic heart failure. Advances have been made against systolic heart failure, in which the ejection fraction falls below normal but not much has been done about diastolic heart failure.

New form of heart failure on the rise

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on New form of heart failure on the rise

New form of heart failure on the rise

Heart failure is routinely described as the progressive loss of ability of the heart to pump blood. But, there is another form of heart failure where the blood–pumping ability of the heart remains near normal. This second form of heart failure is too often overlooked and is just as lethal.

In this condition the heart muscle becomes thickened. The chamber inside gets smaller and the heart is unable to relax to accommodate the blood it needs to pump out. As there is no room for the heart to relax, the blood backs up into the lungs. This kind of anomaly is not picked up by standard measurements of “ejection fraction” – the percentage of blood in the heart that goes out with every beat.

This form of the disease is called “diastolic heart failure” because the problem occurs during the diastole portion of heart activity, as the heart relaxes after a beat. Nearly one–third of these patients have an ejection fraction greater than 50 percent, which is very near normal. However, the death rate for this kind of heart failure matches that of patients with the more common form of heart failure, with more than 20% of all the patients dying within a year. There is a steady increase over 15 years of heart failure with normal or near–normal ejection fraction.

For patients, the symptoms of both types of heart failure are the same: Shortness of breath, difficulty exercising and fluid retention in the body. Physicians cannot make a diagnosis on the basis of symptoms or routine examinations. One has to have an echocardiogram and see the heart pumping and see if the ejection fraction is normal or reduced. Until now, relatively little attention has been paid to diastolic heart failure. Advances have been made against systolic heart failure, in which the ejection fraction falls below normal but not much has been done about diastolic heart failure.

Pacing for heart failure

For patients with advanced heart failure waiting for cardiac transplant, biventricular pacing not only improves the quality of life but also prolongs life. If the ejection fraction is low the combo device also gives an electric shock when the heart stops. It is said that all patients with low ejection fraction should ask their doctors for possible implantation of these devices.

Signals of heart failure

One of the commonest presentations is breathlessness on exertion, which is often confused as a part of aging or being obese. Not being able to climb stairs may be the earliest sign of hypertensive diastolic heart failure. Other signals are:

  1. Feeling extra tired even after a good night’s sleep. People with heart failure may limit activities they like to do or take naps to avoid feeling tired.
  2. Weight gain: Call your doctor if you gain weight for more than 2 days in a row or if you gain 2 or more pounds.
  3. Shortness of breath: Heart failure makes breathing harder, especially during exercise. Lying position may make it worse.
  4. Swollen ankles, legs, belly, and/or lower back, the swelling is often worse at the end of the day.
  5. Going to the bathroom more at night.

Turmeric can prevent heart failure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Traditional Indian turmeric prevents heart failure, lowers cholesterol, prevents cancers and gall stones and augments scar formation in a wound.

Studies from the University of Toronto’s Cardiology Division and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation have shown that curcumin, an ingredient in the curry spice turmeric, when given orally to a variety of mouse models with enlarged hearts (hypertrophy), could prevent and reverse hypertrophy, prevent heart failure, restore heart function and reduce scar formation.

In the studies, curcumin was given to rats, who then underwent surgery or received drugs designed to put them at risk of heart failure. The rats that received curcumin showed more resistance to heart failure and inflammation than comparison groups of rats that did not get curcumin. Curcumin treatment also reversed heart enlargement. Curcumin short–circuited the heart enlargement process, though it’s not clear how it did that.

The healing properties of turmeric have been well–known. The herb has been used in traditional Indian medicine to reduce scar formation. For example, when there is a cut or a bruise, the home remedy is to reach for turmeric powder because it can help to heal without leaving a bad scar.

Curcumin has come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential benefits for reducing cholesterol levels, improving cardiovascular health and fighting cancer.

As an herb, turmeric should to be taken 300 mg thrice–daily with meals. It has useful actions like antioxidant, anti–inflammatory, anti rheumatic; lowering cholesterol, anti cancer and prevention of gall stones. It is also found to be useful in situations like dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, HIV, muscle soreness, peptic ulcer disease, scabies and uveitis.

Curcuminoids, act as free radical scavengers. They also inhibit leukotrienes and synthesis of prostaglandins. The anti–inflammatory activity has been claimed to be comparable to NSAIDs (such as indomethacin).

Curcuminoids lower blood lipid peroxides, decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and increase HDL cholesterol. Turmeric has also been claimed to inhibit platelet aggregation.

Turmeric can prevent heart failure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Turmeric can prevent heart failure

Traditional Indian turmeric prevents heart failure, lowers cholesterol, prevents cancers and gall stones and augments scar formation in a wound.

Studies from the University of Toronto’s Cardiology Division and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation have shown that curcumin, an ingredient in the curry spice turmeric, when given orally to a variety of mouse models with enlarged hearts (hypertrophy), could prevent and reverse hypertrophy, prevent heart failure, restore heart function and reduce scar formation.

In the studies, curcumin was given to rats, who then underwent surgery or received drugs designed to put them at risk of heart failure. The rats that received curcumin showed more resistance to heart failure and inflammation than comparison groups of rats that did not get curcumin.

Curcumin treatment also reversed heart enlargement. Curcumin short–circuited the heart enlargement process, though it’s not clear how it did that.

The healing properties of turmeric have been well-known. The herb has been used in traditional Indian medicine to reduce scar formation. For example, when there is a cut or a bruise, the home remedy is to reach for turmeric powder because it can help to heal without leaving a bad scar.

Curcumin has come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential benefits for reducing cholesterol levels, improving cardiovascular health and fighting cancer.

As an herb, turmeric should to be taken 300 mg thrice–daily with meals. It has useful actions like antioxidant, anti–inflammatory, anti rheumatic; lowering cholesterol, anti cancer and prevention of gall stones. It is also found to be useful in situations like dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, HIV, muscle soreness, peptic ulcer disease, scabies and uveitis.

Curcuminoids, act as free radical scavengers. They also inhibit leukotrienes and synthesis of prostaglandins. The anti–inflammatory activity has been claimed to be comparable to NSAIDs (such as indomethacin).

Curcuminoids lower blood lipid peroxides, decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and increase HDL cholesterol. Turmeric has also been claimed to inhibit platelet aggregation.

How to Eat Salt?

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As per WHO, one should not take more than 5gm of salt in a day. If salt intake is reduced, the incidence of heart attack, heart failure, will be reduced substantially.

Here are the ways:

  1. Substitute white salt with black salt wherever possible.
  2. Do not keep salt shaker on the table.
  3. Do not add salt in your food except in pulses and cooked vegetables.
  4. Do not add salt to salads.
  5. Avoid adding salt to foods at the table.
  6. Take stock of the sources of salt in your diet, such as restaurant meals, salt-based condiments and convenience foods. Some of these are really loaded with salt.
  7. Read the labels when shopping. Look for lower sodium in cereals, crackers, pasta sauces, canned vegetables, or any foods with low-salt options. Or, eat less processed and packaged foods.
  8. Ask about salt added to food, especially at restaurants. Most restaurant chefs will omit salt when requested.
  9. Remember the word ‘Na’, which is present in many drugs, soda etc.
  10. Nothing can be preserved without adding salt to it, therefore beware of processed and frozen fruits.
  11. Many sweet food items have significant hidden salt in them.
  12. To cook with reduced salt, one can add more lemon, garlic, amchur (mango powder) etc.
  13. It takes three months of salt-free diet to get adjusted to it and to ultimately start liking it.
  14. Never add salt to milk.
  15. Beware of salt in tooth pastes.
  16. Replace sodium with potassium salt.
  17. Achar, papad, chutney traditionally used in Indian diet have very high salt content. Most sauces will also have very high salt content.

 

Turmeric can prevent heart failure

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Turmeric can prevent heart failure

Traditional Indian turmeric prevents heart failure, lowers cholesterol, prevents cancers and gall stones and augments scar formation in a wound.

Studies from the University of Toronto’s Cardiology Division and published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation have shown that Curcumin, an ingredient in the curry spice turmeric, when given orally to a variety of mouse models with enlarged hearts (hypertrophy), could prevent and reverse hypertrophy, prevent heart failure, restore heart function and reduce scar formation.

In the studies, curcumin was given to rats, who then underwent surgery or received drugs designed to put them at risk of heart failure. The rats that received curcumin showed more resistance to heart failure and inflammation than comparison groups of rats that did not get curcumin.

Curcumin treatment also reversed heart enlargement. Curcumin short–circuited the heart enlargement process, though it’s not clear how it did that.

The healing properties of turmeric have been well–known. The herb has been used in traditional Indian medicine to reduce scar formation. For example, when there is a cut or a bruise, the home remedy is to reach for turmeric powder because it can help to heal without leaving a bad scar.

Curcumin has come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential benefits for reducing cholesterol levels, improving cardiovascular health and fighting cancer.

As an herb, turmeric should to be taken 300 mg thrice–daily with meals. It has useful actions like antioxidant, anti–inflammatory, anti rheumatic; lowering cholesterol, anti cancer and prevention of gall stones. It is also found to be useful in situations like dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, HIV, muscle soreness, peptic ulcer disease, scabies and uveitis.

Curcuminoids, act as free radical scavengers. They also inhibit leukotrienes and synthesis of prostaglandins. The anti–inflammatory activity has been claimed to be comparable to NSAIDs (such as indomethacin).

Curcuminoids lower blood lipid peroxides, decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and increase HDL cholesterol. Turmeric has also been claimed to inhibit platelet aggregation.

Give BP Drugs At Night

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Blood pressure drugs should be taken at night .

Uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to heart attacks, paralysis and heart failure. Most such attacks occur in the early morning hours. Pulse, blood pressure and thickening of platelets are all higher in the early morning hours.

Controlling early morning blood pressure can reduce cardiovascular mortality.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, among patients with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure taking at least one antihypertensive drug at bedtime significantly improves blood pressure control, with an associated decrease in risk for cardiovascular events.

The study included 661 patients with chronic kidney disease who were randomly assigned either to take all prescribed anti BP drugs on awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime.

Patients were followed for a median of 5.4 years; during that time, patients who took at least 1 BP-lowering drug at bedtime had approximately one third of the cardiac risk compared with those who took all medications on awakening.

A similar significant reduction in cardiac deaths, heart attacks and paralysis was noted with bedtime dosing. Patients taking their medications at bedtime also had a significantly lower mean BP while sleeping.

For each 5 mmHg decrease in mean sleep-time systolic upper BP, there was a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow-up.

Potential explanation for the benefit of night time treatment may be associated with the effect of night time treatment on urinary albumin excretion levels. Urinary albumin excretion is significantly reduced after bedtime, but not morning, treatment.

Two types of sleep-disordered breathing are common among patients with heart failure: snoring-related obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OSAH) and snoring unrelated Cheyne-Stokes breathing (CSB). They are collectively referred to as sleep-disordered breathing (SDB).

OSAH is characterized by reductions or cessations of airflow during sleep, despite ongoing respiratory effort. It is due to upper airway obstruction and clinically is associated Read more

Individuals who are prone to anger may have a higher risk for heart failure, according to a study presented at the Heart Failure Society of America meeting.
Doctors, in a study of black and white men and women, found that high levels of anger were associated with a greater risk of developing heart failure.

In those who are hospitalized for heart failure, high anger levels are associated with a greater risk of getting readmitted.

Uptil now fear was linked to hypertension, anger to heart attacks and possessiveness to heart failure.