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Dr K K Aggarwal

Clinicians should aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Unhealthy behaviors should be managed as aggressively as hypertension, high cholesterol, and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association policy statement published in the journal Circulation. Doctors should create “interprofessional practices” to connect patients with behavior-change specialists. They must implement five A’s when caring for patients 1. Assess a patient’s risk behaviors for heart disease 2. Advise change, such as weight loss or exercise 3. Agree on an action plan 4. Assist with treatment 5. Arrange for follow–up care.

Premature heart disease is when heart disease occurs before 55 years in men and 65 years in women. In premature heart disease, the prevalence of dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels without symptoms) is 75-85%. Fifty-four percent of all patients with premature heart disease and 70% of those with a lipid abnormality have a familial disorder. Hence, a screening test for lipids is recommended for first-degree relatives of patients with myocardial infarction, particularly if premature. Screening should begin with a standard lipid profile and if normal, further testing should be done for Lp(a) and apolipoproteins B and A-I. About 25% patients with premature heart disease and a normal standard lipid profile will have an abnormality in Lp(a) or apo B. Elevated apo A-1 and HDL are likewise associated with reduced CHD risk. First-degree relatives are brothers, sisters, father, mother; second-degree relatives refer to aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces, or nephews and third-degree relatives refer to first cousins, siblings, or siblings of grandparents. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, characterized by high cholesterol, specifically very high LDL (“bad cholesterol”) levels and premature heart disease. Patients may develop premature cardiovascular disease at the age of 30 to 40. Heterozygous FH is a common genetic disorder, occurring in 1:500 people in most countries. Homozygous FH is much rarer, occurring in 1 in a million births. Heterozygous FH is normally treated with drugs. Homozygous FH often does not respond to medical therapy and may require apheresis or liver transplant. To detect familial high cholesterol levels, a universal screening must be done at age 16. The cholesterol levels in heterozygous patients are between 350 to 500 mg/dL, and in homozygous, the levels are between 700 to 1,200 mg/dL.

5 foods that fight high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Oats give you soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries to get more soluble fibers.
  • Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal.
  • Nuts: Eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL by about 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.
  • Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.
  • Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 to 3 times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL–boosting saturated fats and by delivering LDL–lowering omega–3 fats.

5 foods that fight high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on 5 foods that fight high cholesterol

Oats give you soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries to get more soluble fibers. Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal.

Nuts: Eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL by about 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.

Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.

Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 to 3 times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL–boosting saturated fats and by delivering LDL–lowering omega–3 fats

Be Alert from Symptom of Heart Attack

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you are not sure whether you are having heartburn or something more serious –– like a heart attack –– you should get yourself checked out.

The most common symptom of coronary heart disease is chest pain (angina) or discomfort, which can also occur in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw or back. People may mistake this pain for indigestion, which can be dangerous. Sometimes, it’s impossible to tell the difference between the symptoms of heartburn, angina and heart attack.

A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to part of the heart muscle is severely reduced or stopped. This can result in death or disability, depending on how much of the heart muscle is damaged. Unfortunately, many people may not be aware they are having a heart attack.

There are some useful pointers that might help a person know whether they’re having a heart attack or not, but when in doubt, one should check it out.

Symptoms of a heart attack include the sudden onset of tightness, pressure, squeezing, burning or discomfort in the chest, throat, neck or either arm. When these symptoms are accompanied by nausea, vomiting, sweating, shortness of breath or a fainting sensation, Dr. Aggarwal says one should be especially suspicious that you might be having a heart attack. People who have any risk factors that may predispose them to a heart attack should be particularly cautious.

Main points

• Heart attack pain is never pinpointed

• Heart attack pain never lasts less than 30 seconds.

• If you smoke, have diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, are overweight or have a strong family history of heart disease and have any symptom related to the chest or heart, you should be alert.

5 foods that fight high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on 5 foods that fight high cholesterol

Oats give you soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries to get more soluble fibers. Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal.

Nuts: Eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL by about 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.

Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.

Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 to 3 times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL–boosting saturated fats and by delivering LDL–lowering omega–3 fats

5 foods that fight high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on 5 foods that fight high cholesterol

Oats give you soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries to get more soluble fibers. Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal.

Nuts: Eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL by about 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.

Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.

Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 to 3 times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL–boosting saturated fats and by delivering LDL–lowering omega–3 fats

Tips on family history of high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Premature heart disease is when heart disease occurs before 55 years in men and 65 years in women. In premature heart disease, the prevalence of dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels without symptoms) is 75-85%. Fifty-four percent of all patients with premature heart disease and 70% of those with a lipid abnormality have a familial disorder. Hence, a screening test for lipids is recommended for first-degree relatives of patients with myocardial infarction, particularly if premature. Screening should begin with a standard lipid profile and if normal, further testing should be done for Lp(a) and apolipoproteins B and A-I. About 25% patients with premature heart disease and a normal standard lipid profile will have an abnormality in Lp(a) or apo B. Elevated apo A-1 and HDL are likewise associated with reduced CHD risk. First-degree relatives are brothers, sisters, father, mother; second-degree relatives refer to aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces, or nephews and third-degree relatives refer to first cousins, siblings, or siblings of grandparents. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, characterized by high cholesterol, specifically very high LDL “bad cholesterol”) levels and premature heart disease. Patients may develop premature cardiovascular disease at the age of 30 to 40. Heterozygous FH is a common genetic disorder, occurring in 1:500 people in most countries. Homozygous FH is much rarer, occurring in 1 in a million births. Heterozygous FH is normally treated with drugs. Homozygous FH often does not respond to medical therapy and may require apheresis or liver transplant. To detect familial high cholesterol levels, a universal screening must be done at age 16. The cholesterol levels in heterozygous patients are between 350 to 500 mg/dL, and in homozygous, the levels are between 700 to 1,200 mg/dL.

Tips on family history of high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips on family history of high cholesterol

Premature heart disease is when heart disease occurs before 55 years in men and 65 years in women. In premature heart disease, the prevalence of dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels without symptoms) is 75-85%.

Fifty-four percent of all patients with premature heart disease and 70% of those with a lipid abnormality have a familial disorder. Hence, a screening test for lipids is recommended for first-degree relatives of patients with myocardial infarction, particularly if premature. Screening should begin with a standard lipid profile and if normal, further testing should be done for Lp(a) and apolipoproteins B and A-I.

About 25% patients with premature heart disease and a normal standard lipid profile will have an abnormality in Lp(a) or apo B. Elevated apo A-1 and HDL are likewise associated with reduced CHD risk.

First-degree relatives are brothers, sisters, father, mother; second-degree relatives refer to aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces, or nephews and third-degree relatives refer to first cousins, siblings, or siblings of grandparents.

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, characterized by high cholesterol, specifically very high LDL “bad cholesterol”) levels and premature heart disease. Patients may develop premature cardiovascular disease at the age of 30 to 40.

Heterozygous FH is a common genetic disorder, occurring in 1:500 people in most countries. Homozygous FH is much rarer, occurring in 1 in a million births. Heterozygous FH is normally treated with drugs. Homozygous FH often does not respond to medical therapy and may require apheresis or liver transplant.

To detect familial high cholesterol levels, a universal screening must be done at age 16. The cholesterol levels in heterozygous patients are between 350 to 500 mg/dL, and in homozygous, the levels are between 700 to 1,200 mg/dL.

Tips on family history of high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Tips on family history of high cholesterol

Premature heart disease is when heart disease occurs before 55 years in men and 65 years in women. In premature heart disease, the prevalence of dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels without symptoms) is 75–85%.

Fifty-four percent of all patients with premature heart disease and 70% of those with a lipid abnormality have a familial disorder. Hence, a screening test for lipids is recommended for first–degree relatives of patients with myocardial infarction, particularly if premature. Screening should begin with a standard lipid profile and if normal, further testing should be done for Lp(a) and apolipoproteins B and A–I.

About 25% patients with premature heart disease and a normal standard lipid profile will have an abnormality in Lp(a) or apo B. Elevated apo A–1 and HDL are likewise associated with reduced CHD risk.

First–degree relatives are brothers, sisters, father, mother; second–degree relatives refer to aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces, or nephews and third–degree relatives refer to first cousins, siblings, or siblings of grandparents.

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, characterized by high cholesterol, specifically very high LDL “bad cholesterol”) levels and premature heart disease. Patients may develop premature cardiovascular disease at the age of 30 to 40. Heterozygous FH is a common genetic disorder, occurring in 1:500 people in most countries. Homozygous FH is much rarer, occurring in 1 in a million births. Heterozygous FH is normally treated with drugs. Homozygous FH often does not respond to medical therapy and may require apheresis or liver transplant.

To detect familial high cholesterol levels, a universal screening must be done at age 16. The cholesterol levels in heterozygous patients are between 350 to 500 mg/dL, and in homozygous, the levels are between 700 to 1,200 mg/dL.

Tips on family history of high cholesterol

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Tips on family history of high cholesterol

Premature heart disease is when heart disease occurs before 55 years in men and 65 years in women. In premature heart disease, the prevalence of dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels without symptoms) is 75-85%.

Fifty-four percent of all patients with premature heart disease and 70% of those with a lipid abnormality have a familial disorder. Hence, a screening test for lipids is recommended for first-degree relatives of patients with myocardial infarction, particularly if premature. Screening should begin with a standard lipid profile and if normal, further testing should be done for Lp(a) and apolipoproteins B and A-I.

About 25% patients with premature heart disease and a normal standard lipid profile will have an abnormality in Lp(a) or apo B. Elevated apo A-1 and HDL are likewise associated with reduced CHD risk.

First-degree relatives are brothers, sisters, father, mother; second-degree relatives refer to aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces, or nephews and third-degree relatives refer to first cousins, siblings, or siblings of grandparents.

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, characterized by high cholesterol, specifically very high LDL “bad cholesterol”) levels and premature heart disease. Patients may develop premature cardiovascular disease at the age of 30 to 40. Heterozygous FH is a common genetic disorder, occurring in 1:500 people in most countries. Homozygous FH is much rarer, occurring in 1 in a million births. Heterozygous FH is normally treated with drugs. Homozygous FH often does not respond to medical therapy and may require apheresis or liver transplant.

To detect familial high cholesterol levels, a universal screening must be done at age 16. The cholesterol levels in heterozygous patients are between 350 to 500 mg/dL, and in homozygous, the levels are between 700 to 1,200 mg/dL.