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Dr K K Aggarwal

Do not tell others, it’s a Secret

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Most Asians are known for two habits, firstly a ‘crab’ nature and secondly the habit of telling others that “I am telling you a secret and please do not tell others.”

Crab nature mean pulling each other’s legs and not allowing any one to rise. Most people, especially women, will gossip and tell all secrets that they know. For clearing their own consciousness they will add a sentence “I am telling you the secret and do not tell others.” The very fact you have told it to someone, it no more remains a secret.

In India we do not respect confidentiality laws and do not sign a non disclosure agreement. In hospitals you will hear the names of the hospitalized person being shouted loud outside the ICU; the list of operation theatre is displayed at every corner of the hospital.

Do not tell others, it’s a Secret

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Do not tell others, it’s a Secret

Most Asians are known for two habits, firstly a ‘crab’ nature and secondly the habit of telling others that “I am telling you a secret and please do not tell others.”

Crab nature mean pulling each other’s legs and not allowing any one to rise. Most people, especially women, will gossip and tell all secrets that they know. For clearing their own consciousness they will add a sentence “I am telling you the secret and do not tell others.” The very fact you have told it to someone, it no more remains a secret.

In India we do not respect confidentiality laws and do not sign a non disclosure agreement. In hospitals you will hear the names of the hospitalized person being shouted loud outside the ICU; the list of operation theatre is displayed at every corner of the hospital.

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead.

Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counselled and death declared.

After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family.

They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals to be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation.

They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead. Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counselled and death declared. After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family. They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals to be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation. They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Should there be a mourning room in the hospital?

In a survey conducted by Heart Care Foundation of India of 400 people from all walks of life, 90% of the people wanted that wishes of the dying person and dead body should be respected in the hospital setting. They said that doctors should be more compassionate and emphatic at the time of declaring a patient dead.

Unless people are expecting a death, death usually comes as a shock to the family members. It is expected that the relations may be in agony, pain and even anger. Every hospital should have a mourning room where the relatives should be made to sit, counseled and death declared.

After the death is declared, the treating doctors, nurses and hospital staff must sit with the patient’s relatives, counsel them, tell them about the sequence of events before death and also counsel them about how to handle the dead body. People also want to know the cause of death so that similar thing may not happen to another person in the family.

They also want to know if the body is infectious or not and what rituals to be avoided if the body is infectious. They also like to know about how to preserve the dead body till cremation.

They may also like to know whether a postmortem is required to know exact cause of death, which can help future family members of the family.

Hospital safety incidents have 20% mortality

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Hospital safety incidents have 20% mortality

Patients who experience a patient safety incident have a 20 percent chance of dying as a result of the incident.

The 16 different patient safety concerns are:

  1. Complications of anesthesia
  2. Death in low mortality diagnosis related groups
  3. Bed sores
  4. Failure to rescue
  5. Foreign body left in during procedure
  6. Physician–induced pneumothorax (air in the lungs)
  7. Selected infections due to medical care
  8. Post–operative hip fracture
  9. Postoperative hemorrhage or hematoma
  10. Postoperative physiologic and metabolic derangements
  11. Postoperative lung failure
  12. Postoperative pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis (clot in the legs or the lungs)
  13. Postoperative infections
  14. Postoperative wound dehiscence in abdominopelvic surgical patients
  15. Accidental puncture or laceration
  16. Transfusion reaction

Mobile Phones Can Spread Infections In The Hospital

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Mobile phones used by hospital healthcare workers are often contaminated with germs, including those that can cause illness in hospitalized patients.

In a study published in the BMC journal Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, Turkish researchers swabbed the dominant hand and the mobile phones of 200 doctors, nurses and other healthcare staff working in intensive care units and operating rooms and found that 95 percent of telephones were contaminated, often with more than one type of microbe and often with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Potentially serious infectious bugs such as staphylococci were isolated from phones in intensive care units.

Ninety percent of health care workers said they never cleaned their mobile phones. The investigators recommend routine decontamination of mobile phones with alcohol-containing disinfectants.