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Dr K K Aggarwal

Yanmule sarvatirhaani, Yannagre sarvadevataa, 

Yanmadhye sarvavedaascha,Tulasi taam namaamyaham

“I bow to the Tulsi, At whose base are all the holy places, At whose top reside all the deities and In whose middle are all the Vedas.”

The Tulsi or Sacred Basil is one of the most sacred plants. There is a Sanskrit: “Tulanaa naasti athaiva tulsi” that which is incomparable in its qualities is the tulsi. It is the only pooja samagri which can be washed and reused.

Satyabhama once weighed Lord Krishna against all her legendary wealth. The scales did not balance until a last single tulsi leaf was placed along with the wealth on the scale by Rukmini with devotion. Thus, tulsi played the vital role of demonstrating that even a small object offered with devotion is of greater value than all the wealth in the world.

The Tulsi leaf has great medicinal value and is used to cure various ailments, including the common cold. Tulsi seeds are good for male infertility and increase the viscosity of semen and sperm counts. It has detoxifying properties and is used in fasts including the Satynarayana Katha where a thousand tulsi leaves are added to the water for pooja, and which is consumed later by everybody.

Tulsi also symbolizes Goddess Lakshmi. Those who wish to be righteous and have a happy family life worship the tulsi. Tulsi is ‘married’ to Lord Vishnu with pomp and show like any other wedding. This ‘marriage’ is solemnised because according to a legend, the Lord blessed her to be His consort.  Tulsi is worshipped in the months of Magh and Kartik. Tulsi vivah is observed in the month of Kartik and is the symbolic marriage of Lord Vishnu in the form of a shaligram (sacred stone) and Tulsi. It indicates the importance of  Tulsi for fertility. Tulsi pooja is an important component of any marriage.

(Suggestion: give the English equivalent months for magh and kartik)

Importance of Vitamin D in Mythology

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Today it is a known fact that 80% of the India society is Vitamin D deficient. It was probably known to our Rishi Munis and they created rituals so that everybody gets enough Vitamin D from sunlight. Shahi snan in sunlight are mentioned in our Vedic literature.

1. The month of Magha, Vaishakha and Kartik are considered as months for Shahi Snans where one is supposed to worship sun early in the morning and eat calcium rich food whether it is Urad Ki Daal or sesame seeds.

2.      The Chhat pooja which takes place immediately after Diwali is also linked to sun worship.

3.      The Marghshirsha month immediately after the month of Kartik also involves worshipping sun.

4.      Karkit purnima and Vaishakh purnima are especially known for sun worshiping.

Vitamin D deficiency is linked with metabolic syndrome, heart diseases and also with fertility. All these months when sun is worshipped are also the months of increased fertility. After  chaturmaas is over, Tulsi vivah starts the marriage season during which one worships both Tulsi and Amla. Both of them are known to increase the quantity of semen and increased ovulation.

Probably, the age old treatment of infertility was to acquire vitamin D, taking calcium rich food and consume both tulsi and amla on regular basis.

 The current vitamin D mantra is that 40 days in a year for atleast 40 minutes, one should expose 40% of the body to the sunlight either after sunrise or just before sunset.