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Dr K K Aggarwal

Why do people suffer?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Garud Puran and Hindu mythology, one of the reasons for suffering is your past birth’s debts. Your purpose of life is to face sufferings to pay these debts.

The second reason is your present deeds till today starting from birth. If your sum total of bad deeds is more than good deeds, they get added to your previous birth’s debts.

The third reason for suffering is in the form of struggle which you entertain to attain future success. Some people do not call it as suffering.

The last reason for suffering is some people acquire yogic powers to take sufferings of others. The classical examples are Shirdi Sai Baba and Jesus Christ who were known to cure others by adding their suffering to their own account. If you see most of the Gods or holy people had suffered in their last time, be it Jesus Christ, Krishna, Buddha or Sai Baba.

Only Rishi Munis can remain alive and die at will even after they have paid for all their debts.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Krishna teaches us the path of acquiring inner happiness. It can be understood by the four cycles of Krishna described in the Vedic literature: Krishna the Child, Krishna the Husband and Friend, Krishna the Preacher and Krishna the Sanyasi.

The childhood of Krishna describes the methodology and components of a child education. Krishna, pure consciousness, was born as the eight child of Devki representing that during pregnancy one needs to follow the eight limbs of yoga to get a child with no disease.

Initial childhood is full of pure consciousness that spreads love to everyone without any discrimination. The only thing the child during this period does is to steal and spread love and that is what Krishna as Makhan Chor depicts.With time the child’s mental faculty starts developing and distracting the child’s mind. During this phase of life, the child needs to be taught to control the thoughts and mind by learning viveka (discrimination between good and bad) and doing abhyas or hard work. The episode of Krishna entering into the pond (thoughts) fighting with Kaliya (duality of mind) and controlling it represents the same. This also coincides with the time a child should be sent to the school.The next phase of childhood is activation of intellect which in Krishna’s life is depicted as the questions in his mind “Radha kyun gori, main kyun kala?” The incident is during Krishna playing Holi with Gopis and Radha. This happens when the child gets an exposure to the worldly atmosphere and starts getting attached to it. This is the time for the child to be taught control of mind and intellect by one point concentration on the object of concentration. This is also the time when the child should be taught the purpose of life, and the aim for which he has to live in future (usually adolescent by this time).

Krishna controls the intellect by winning over Indra (intellect) and raising the Govardhan Parvat (turmoil of the mind) on one finger and saves the public from the rainy storm (wavering thoughts). The one finger here indicates one point concentration on the object of concentration. Once the child is taught how to control the intellect, he or she completes spiritual education and learns about the true self.

Control of mind (Kalia) and intellect (Indra) leads the child to the next phase of life. In Krishna’s life it coincides with Ras Leela where Krishna is seen dancing with Radha and every Gopi. This also reflects the time for the internal ego to get killed and one acquires the qualities of humility. Killing of Kansa depicts the killing of ego. Once the ego is killed and humility is acquired, Radha and flute are no more required and Krishna is now a perfect man and is ready to enter the next ashram of life called Grahasthashram. Radha (body) gets merged with consciousness and flute (humility) is a part of the nature. One now acquires a sudarshan chakra or a weapon to take decisions and adopt the good and kill the evil.

Krishna is always depicted as a blue color God with yellow clothes and a flute in his hands. Blue color indicates everything is possible and yellow clothes indicate that one can acquire it provided one has the flute, a hollow wood representing egoless nature.

Whenever Krishna is shown with a flute, the female figure with him is Radha with blue sari and yellow color, along with gopis (thoughts) dancing around them indicating that the thoughts of the mind are in symphony with each other and there is a union of mind, body and soul. Here the soul is represented by Krishna, mind by the flute, thoughts with gopis and body with Radha.

The second phase of Krishna’s life is shown as a perfect achiever and friend, which is evident from the story of Sudama.

The third phase of Krishna’s life represents Krishna as an advisor, which shows his role in Mahabharata and his preaching in Bhagavad Gita. He teaches the message of Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Gnana Yoga and Raja Yoga for acquiring excellence in life and inner happiness.

The last role of Krishna as a sanyasi is the end of Krishna’s life. The four cycles also coincide with the four ashrams of life.To achieve inner happiness the message from Krishna’s life is to learn to make efforts to control the mind, to win over the intellect by one point concentration and to acquire qualities of humility and killing internal ego. Only with this can one become a perfect man like Krishna.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

Krishna teaches us the path of acquiring inner happiness. It can be understood by the four cycles of Krishna described in the Vedic literature: Krishna the Child, Krishna the Husband and Friend, Krishna the Preacher and Krishna the Sanyasi.

The childhood of Krishna describes the methodology and components of a child education.  Krishna, pure consciousness, was born as the eight child of Devki representing that during pregnancy one needs to follow the eight limbs of yoga to get a child with no disease.

Initial childhood is full of pure consciousness that spreads love to everyone without any discrimination. The only thing the child during this period does is to steal and spread love and that is what Krishna as Makhan Chor depicts.

With time the child’s mental faculty starts developing and distracting the child’s mind. During this phase of life, the child needs to be taught to control the thoughts and mind by learning viveka (discrimination between good and bad) and doing abhyas or hard work. The episode of Krishna entering into the pond (thoughts) fighting with Kaliya (duality of mind) and controlling it represents the same. This also coincides with the time a child should be sent to the school.

The next phase of childhood is activation of intellect which in Krishna’s life is depicted as the questions in his mind “Radha kyun gori, main kyun kala?” The incident is during Krishna playing Holi with Gopis and Radha. This happens when the child gets an exposure to the worldly atmosphere and starts getting attached to it. This is the time for the child to be taught control of mind and intellect by one point concentration on the object of concentration. This is also the time when the child should be taught the purpose of life, and the aim for which he has to live in future (usually adolescent by this time).

Krishna controls the intellect by winning over Indra (intellect) and raising the Govardhan Parvat (turmoil of the mind) on one finger and saves the public from the rainy storm (wavering thoughts). The one finger here indicates one point concentration on the object of concentration. Once the child is taught how to control the intellect, he or she completes spiritual education and learns about the true self.

Control of mind (Kalia) and intellect (Indra) leads the child to the next phase of life. In Krishna’s life it coincides with Ras Leela where Krishna is seen dancing with Radha and every Gopi. This also reflects the time for the internal ego to get killed and one acquires the qualities of humility. Killing of Kansa depicts the killing of ego. Once the ego is killed and humility is acquired Radha and flute are no more required and Krishna is now a perfect man and is ready to enter the next ashram of life called Grahasthashram. Radha (body) gets merged with consciousness and flute (humility) is a part of the nature. One now acquires a sudarshan chakra or a weapon to take decisions and adopt the good and kill the evil.

Krishna is always depicted as a blue color God with yellow clothes and a flute in his hands. Blue color indicates everything is possible and yellow clothes indicate that one can acquire it provided one has the flute, a hollow wood representing egoless nature.

Whenever Krishna is shown with a flute, the female figure with him is Radha with blue sari and yellow color, along with gopis (thoughts) dancing around them indicating that the thoughts of the mind are in symphony with each other and there is a union of mind, body and soul. Here the soul is represented by Krishna, mind by the flute, thoughts with gopis and body with Radha.

The second phase of Krishna’s life is shown as a perfect achiever and friend, which is evident from the story of Sudama.

The third phase of Krishna’s life represents Krishna as an advisor, which shows his role in Mahabharata and his preaching in Bhagavad Gita. He teaches the message of Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Gnana Yoga and Raja Yoga for acquiring excellence in life and inner happiness.

The last role of Krishna as a sanyasi is the end of Krishna’s life. The four cycles also coincide with the four ashrams of life.

To achieve inner happiness the message from Krishna’s life is to learn to make efforts to control the mind, to win over the intellect by one point concentration and to acquire qualities of humility and killing internal ego. Only with this can one become a perfect man like Krishna.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views.

Why do people suffer?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Why do people suffer?

As per Garud Puran and Hindu mythology, one of the reasons for suffering is your past birth’s debts. Your purpose of life is to face sufferings to pay these debts.

The second reason is your present deeds till today starting from birth. If your sum total of bad deeds is more than good deeds, they get added to your previous birth’s debts.

The third reason for suffering is in the form of struggle which you entertain to attain future success. Some people do not call it as suffering.

The last reason for suffering is some people acquire yogic powers to take sufferings of others. The classical examples are Shirdi Sai Baba and Jesus Christ who were known to cure others by adding their suffering to their own account. If you see most of the Gods or holy people had suffered in their last time, be it Jesus Christ, Krishna, Buddha or Sai Baba.

Only Rishi Munis can remain alive and die at will even after they have paid for all their debts.

Why do people suffer?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Why do people suffer?

As per Garud Puran and Hindu mythology, one of the reasons for suffering is the debts of your past birth. Your purpose of life is to face sufferings to pay these debts. The second reason is your present deeds till today starting from birth. If your sum total of bad deeds is more than good deeds, they get added to your previous birth’s debts.

The third reason for suffering is the form of struggle, which you entertain to attain future success. Some people do not call it as suffering.

The last reason for suffering is that some people acquire yogic powers to take on the sufferings of others. The classical examples are Shirdi Sai Baba and Jesus Christ who were known to cure others by adding their suffering to their own account. Most Gods or holy people had suffered in their last time, be it Jesus Christ, Krishna, Buddha or Sai Baba. Only Rishi Munis can remain alive and die at will even after they have paid for all their debts.


The Science Behind Birth Of Krishna In A Jail Of Ignorance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Krishna represents Brahman or God consciousnesses or consciousness- the self. The birth of Krishna is synonymous with the process of self-realization. Normally desires and negative thoughts core our consciousness with ignorance. The journey to self-realization involves removal or shedding of this ignorance which can only be done by the eight spiritual principles as described by the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.


And these are Yama (self control); Niyama (self-discipline), Asanas (bodily postures); Pranayama (control of breath), Pratyahara (withdrawal), Dharana (one pointed), Dhyana (contemplation) and Samadhi (self-realization).

These eight limbs or eight steps signify the journey of eight days after full moon falling on Rakshabandhan, a day celebrated to control one’s lust.

Ignorance is symbolized by a PRISON, which represents darkness; narrow-minded approach (small entry gate) and limitedness to everything (small room). The chain in the prison means the bondages to lust, greed, desires and ego.

Birth of Krishna in the prison means ‘self-realization out of ignorance’. It can only be acquired by adhering to the eight principles of Ashtang Yoga with Tapas (Abhyasa) or hard work. Krishna, born, as the eighth child of Devaki, represents tapas of eight limbs of yoga. The self-realization can only occur after the seven strips are successfully negotiated and the mind is purified in the process.

In the state of Samadhi, there is spontaneous birth of the self. In this state (sama = equal; dhi – intelligence) one controls equality and balances between good and the bad.

The symbolization is that, as Krishna was born, the chains that bound his father fell off; the doors that had been bolted flew open and the prison guards immediately went into sleep. Then Vasudeva, the father took Krishna and went to Gokul, by placing Krishna in a basket and walking across the Yamuna river, where at the same time Yashoda, consort of Nanda, had given birth to a female child.

The ‘chains’ here mean the bondage to the external world and the five senses. A self realized person is free of these bondages. The opening of gates symbolizes control over lust, desire, greed and attachments. Sleeping of the guard symbolizes, that in a self-realized state, one is totally cut off from the world. Everything else perishes and one gets detached.

The thunderstorm, the rain, and the fire, all represent the internal turmoil of uncontrolled desires and hatred. The moment Krishna’s feet touch the turbulent water, everything settles. The spiritual lesson is that by turning inwards and towards one’s pure consciousness any turbulent state of mind can be controlled.

While acquiring all that, one must control the ego and keep the desires inwards and not have egocentric desires. Controlling the ego is depicted as a snake sitting over the basket and guarding Lord Krishna.

The baby girl born at Gokul represents the Mayashakti, which was killed by Kansa (the ego of the body).

Controlling the desires and attachments is easy but controlling the Ego is the most difficult. That is what is represented by the fact that at the time of birth of Krishna, Kansa still remained alive. It took many years for Krishna (self realized state) to kill the ego (Kansa).

Acquiring a state of self-realization should not be the ultimate goal in life. After self-realization, if the ego is not controlled one can misuse one’s spiritual powers. The ultimate aim in life should then be to kill the ego, which is what Krishna ultimately did.

Medical Profession Follows Krishna and Not Rama

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Teachings from both the epics of our country are taught to every child during school age. The first being Ramayana and the second being Mahabharata. Ramayana depicts Lord Ram as the savior of truth and a person who lives an in atmosphere of truthfulness till the end. Ramayana probably is a reflection of the collective consciousness of Satyuga where the majority of the people believed in truthfulness.

Then came an era of Tetya or Dwapara yuga where the definition of dharma (to hold people together) changed as per the collective consciousness of the people. The teaching of Lord Krishna in Mahabharata was that you have to live with truthfulness but speaking a lie can be your dharma in special situations. He said that a lie which can save somebody’s life without affecting any other person may be spoken and a truth, which if spoken can hurt somebody or is not going to harm anybody if not spoken may not be spoken.

Today we are living in Kalyuga and Krishna of today is every medical doctor treating a patient. For the interest of the patient and the society if doctors were to follow the principles of Rama, miseries would have increased. We as medical professionals are taught the example of Krishna and not Rama. We are taught that our utmost duty is the comfort of the patient. In doing so we are taught not to tell a dying person that he is going to die or not to tell a cancer patient that he is going to die in the next two to three months.

As a part of our social commitment a job of a medical professional is to save the life of a person. Everybody knows that prostitution is a crime but both Govt. of India and National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) have a program in which they distribute free condoms to the commercial sex workers. Similarly, all addicts during de–addiction are provided drugs as a part of the prescription though the quantity has been defined as to be lower than 5 grams. All addicts are treated and not put behind the bar.

The Law today state that an attempt to commit suicide is a crime (section 309 of the Indian Penal Code 1860) and consuming a drug is also a crime. But medically a doctor would look it differently. For him attempt to suicide is linked to an underlying depression and the patient needs a treatment and not jail. Addiction is a disease and every addict on similar grounds need de–addiction program and not jail.

The country’s Law is very harsh and needs to be changed. Probably when the law was made addiction was not considered a disease.

Punishment for a person attempting to commit suicide should be to get a compulsory treatment for depression in a time bound manner and for an addict to get a complete de–addiction done in a time bound manner.

The answer is not punishment but rehabilitation. But till the Law is changed, the only way medical professionals can help patients with attempted suicide is to write that it was accidental and patients who are addicts is by showing that either it was accidental ingestion or he or she ingested an unknown substance.

Most of the doctors are taught not to do urine or blood test in such cases because if the test comes out to be positive, the police will have no other alternative than to arrest the addict and put them behind the bar.

The Law says that possession of cocaine in anybody’s house can amount to imprisonment. Will the same law apply to the Chief Minister or Lt. Governor of a state if cocaine is found in their state or Prime Minister of President of the country if cocaine is found in their country?

But if we look from the angle of law makers under section 64A in the NDPS Act, there is a provision that the court can direct drug addicts to get rehab done in a Govt. de–addiction centre. But most of the doctors are unaware about this. Doctors can easily label a patient as drug addict and save them. But how many people would like to be labeled as an addict or prefer a Govt. centre when best of the private sector de–addiction centers are available.

The bailable arrest of doctors in Rahul Mahajan case is a clear indication for the medical professionals to stop thinking that they are next to GOD and they have any social responsibility. They should follow the rule book of the law and state observations as they are.

Medical Profession Follows Krishna and Not Rama

By
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Medical Profession Follows Krishna and Not Rama

Teachings from both the epics of our country are practically taught to every child during school age. The first being Ramayana and the second being Mahabharata. Ramayana depicts Lord Ram as the savior of truth and a person who lives an in atmosphere of truthfulness till end. Ramayana probably is a reflection of the collective consciousness of satyuga where the majority of the people believed in truthfulness.

Then came an era of tritya or dwapara yuga where the definition of dharma (to hold people together) changed as per the collective consciousness of the people. The teaching of Lord Krishna in Mahabharata was that you have to live with truthfulness but speaking a lie can be your dharma in special situations. He said that a lie which can save somebody’s life without affecting any other person may be spoken and a truth which can hurt somebody if spoken and is not going to harm anybody if not spoken may not be spoken.

Today we are living in Kalyuga and Krishna of today is every medical doctor treating a patient. For the interest of the patient and the society if doctors were to follow the principles of Rama miseries would have increased. We as medical professionals are taught the example of Krishna and not Rama. We are taught that our utmost duty is the comfort of the patient. In doing so we are taught not to tell a dying person that he is going to die or not to tell a cancer patient that he is going to die in the next two to three months.

As a part of our social commitment a job of a medical professional is to save the life of a person. Everybody knows that prostitution is a crime but both Govt. of India and National AIDS Control Organization has a programme in which they distribute free condoms to the commercial sex workers. Similarly, all addicts during de-addiction are provided drugs as a part of the prescription though the quantity has been defined as to be lower than 5 grams. All addicts are treated and not put behind the bar.

The Law today state that an attempt to commit suicide is a crime (section 309 of the Indian Penal Code 1860) and consuming a drug is also a crime. But medically a doctor would look it differently. For him attempt to suicide is linked to an underlying depression and the patient needs a treatment and not jail. Addiction is a disease and every addict on similar grounds need de-addiction programme and not jail.

The country’s Law is very harsh and needs to be changed. Probably when the law was made addiction was not considered a disease.

Punishment for a person attempting to commit suicide should be to get a compulsory treatment for depression in a time bound manner and for an addict to get a complete de-addiction done in a time bound manner.

The answer is not punishment but rehabilitation. But till the Law is changed the only way medical professionals can help patients with attempted suicide is to write that it was accidental and patients who are addicts is by showing that either it was accidental ingestion or he or she ingested an unknown substance.

Most of the doctors are taught not to do urine or blood test in such cases as if the test comes out to be positive the police will have no other alternative than to arrest the addict and put them behind the bar.

The Law says that possession of cocaine in anybody’s house can amount to imprisonment. Will the same law apply to the Chief Minister or Lt. Governor of a state if cocaine is found in their state or Prime Minister of President of the country if cocaine is found in their country?

But if we look from the angle of law makers under section 64A in the NDPS act there is a provision that the court can direct drug addicts to get rehab done in a Govt. de-addiction centre and leave them. But most of the doctors are not aware of the same. Doctors can easily label a patient as drug addict and save them. But how many people would like to be labeled as an addict or prefer a Govt. centre when best of the private sector de-addiction centers are available.

But the bailable arrest of doctors in Rahul Mahajan case is a clear indication for the medical professionals to stop thinking they are next to GOD and they have any social responsibility. They should follow the rule book of the law and state observations as they are.

Krishna teaches us the path of acquiring inner happiness. It can be understood by the four cycles of Krishna described in the Vedic literature: Krishna the Child, Krishna the Husband and Friend, Krishna the Preacher and Krishna the Sanyasi.

The childhood of Krishna describes the methodology and components of a child education.  Krishna, pure consciousness, was born as the eight child of Devki representing that during pregnancy one needs to follow the eight limbs of yoga to get a child with no disease.

Initial childhood is full of pure consciousness that spreads love to everyone without any discrimination. The only thing the child during this period does is to steal and spread love and that is what Krishna as Makhan Chor depicts.

With time the child’s mental faculty starts developing distracting the child’s mind. During this phase of life the child needs to be taught to control the thoughts and mind by learning viveka (discrimination between good and bad) and doing abhyas or hard work. The episode of Krishna entering into the pond (thoughts) fighting with Kaliya (duality of mind) and controlling it represents the same. This also coincides with the time a child should be sent to the school.

The next phase of childhood is activation of intellect which in Krishna’s life is depicted as the questions in his mind “Radha kyun gori, main kyun kala?” The incident is during Krishna playing Holi with Gopis and Radha. This happens when the child gets an exposure to the worldly atmosphere and starts getting attached to it. This is the time for the child to be taught control of mind and intellect by one point concentration on the object of concentration. This is also the time when the child should be taught the purpose of life, and the aim for which he has to live in future ( usually adolescent by this time).

Krishna controls the intellect by winning over Indra (intellect) and raising Govardhan Parvat (turmoil of the mind) by one finger and saves the public from the rainy storm (wavering thoughts). One finger here indicates one point concentration on the object of concentration. Once the child is taught how to control the intellect, he or she complete spiritual education and learns about the true self.

Control of mind ( Kalia) and intellect ( Indra) leads the child to the next phase of life. In Krishna’s life it coincides with Ras Leela where Krishna is seen dancing with Radha and every Gopi. This also reflects the time for the internal ego to get killed and one acquires the qualities of humility. Killing of Kansa depicts the killing of ego. Once the ego is killed and humility is acquired Radha and flute are no more required and Krishna is now a perfect man and is ready to enter the next ashram of life called Grahasthashram. Radha (body) gets merged with consciousness and flute (humility) is a part of the nature. One now acquires a sudershan chakra or a weapon to take decisions and adopt the good and kill the evil.

Krishna is always depicted with a blue colour God with yellow clothes and a flute in his hands. Blue colour indicates everything is possible and yellow clothes indicate that one can acquire it provided one has the flute which is a hollow wood representing egoless nature.

Whenever Krishna is shown with a flute, the lady with him is Radha with blue sari and yellow colour, along with gopis (thoughts) dancing around them indicating that the thoughts of the mind are in symphony with each other and there is a union of mind, body and soul. Here the soul is represented by Krishna, mind by the flute, thoughts with the gopis and body with the Radha.

The second phase of Krishna’s life is shown as a perfect achiever and friend, which is evident from the story of Sudhama.

The third phase of Krishna’s life represent Krishna as an advisor, which shows his role in Mahabharata and his preaching in Bhagavad Gita. He teaches the message of Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Gnana Yoga and Raja Yoga for acquiring excellence in life and inner happiness.

The last role of Krishna as a sanyasi is the end of Krishna’s life. The four cycles also coincide with the four ashrams of life.

 To achieve inner happiness the message from Krishna’s life is to learn to make efforts to control the mind, to win over the intellect by one point concentration and to acquire qualities of humility and killing internal ego. With this only one can become a perfect man like Krishna.