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Dr K K Aggarwal

Diet for heart disease prevention with special reference to edible oils

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Food of plant origin contains no cholesterol. Only animal foods have cholesterol, therefore, all oils which are of plant origin will have zero cholesterol while animal fat like Desi Ghee (cow or buffalo) will have cholesterol.
  • A saturated fat will be solid at room temperature, while the fat, which is unsaturated will be liquid at room temperature. All plant oils, therefore, will be unsaturated and desi ghee, butter will be saturated. When an unsaturated liquid oil is hydrogenated, it becomes hydrogenated oil, solid at room temperature and therefore, will be saturated.
  • Unsaturated oils can be polyunsaturated or monounsaturated. Polyunsaturated oils will oxidize on heating and may not be suitable for reuse. Monounsaturated oils are heat stable and the oils can be reused after frying or boiling.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids in unsaturated oils are the key for cardiovascular prevention. The N3:N6 ratio is the one which classifies various oils. More N3 means more omega-3 fatty acids.
  • When choosing unsaturated oils, a blend of oils is better than single oil and, if one oil has to be used, then it is preferred to be monounsaturated. A single oil if used should be mustard oil, groundnut oil or olive oil. A study has shown that Mediterranean diet, which involves consumption of pure virgin olive oil in adequate amount, can cause regression of heart diseases. Virgin olive oil has also been shown to dissolve gallbladder stones. There are blends of oils available, which are a mix of poly and monounsaturated oils and if they have more N3:N6 ratio, they can be consumed from healthy point of view.
  • Trans fats are the biggest culprit (hydrogenated oils). Saturated fats increase LDL cholesterol while trans fats increase LDL cholesterol and simultaneously reduce HDL cholesterol. It is better to consume desi ghee than vanaspati ghee.
  • Moderation and variety is the answer. One should not consume more than ½ kg of ghee, oil, butter in a month, which means 3 teaspoonfuls in a day.
  • One should not re-fry or deep fry food articles. One should use non-stick pans for reducing the amount of oil in cooking. The smaller pieces of vegetables you cut while cooking, the more will be available surface area and more will be oil consumption. One should boil the vegetables and cook them to reduce the amount of oil required for cooking.
  • There are some medicines available such as lipase inhibitors, called cheating drugs, which do not allow fat to be absorbed if taken in excess in parties. As per naturopathy, consuming a glass of water with lemon after half an hour of eating food may help in washing off the fat lined on the intestinal lining.
  • A 1% rise in bad cholesterol increases the chances of heart attack by 2% and 1% reduction in good HDL cholesterol reduces the chances of heart attack by 3%.

Add fiber to the diet only slowly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight.

Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort.

Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily.

There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber.

Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

Add fiber to the diet only slowly

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Add fiber to the diet only slowly

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight.

Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort.

Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily.

There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber.

Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.

Five cholesterol friendly foods

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Oats give you 1 to 2 g of soluble fiber.

2. Beans are rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest.

3. Nuts: Eating 2 ozs of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL, on the order of 5%.

4. Foods fortified with sterols and stanols gum up the body’s ability to absorb cholesterol from food. Getting 2 g of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.

5. Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 or 3 times a week can lower LDL cholesterol.

Five cholesterol-friendly foods

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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1. Oats give you 1 to 2 g of soluble fiber. 2. Beans are rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest. 3. Nuts: Eating 2 ozs of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL, on the order of 5%. 4. Foods fortified with sterols and stanols gum up the body’s ability to absorb cholesterol from food. Getting 2 g of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%. 5. Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 or 3 times a week can lower LDL cholesterol.

All diabetics should have their cardiac examination done as cardiovascular disease accounts for 65% of deaths in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Intensive and aggressive management of diabetes can reduce the risk of getting future heart attacks. As per the new guidelines, all patients with diabetes should have a blood pressure below 120/80 mmHg and fasting blood sugar lower than 90 mg%. The ABC of diabetes management is to keep abdominal circumference lower than 32 inches in women and lower than 35 inches in men, blood pressure lower than 120/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol less than 100 mg%.

Add Fiber To The Diet Only Slowly

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Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Add Fiber To The Diet Only Slowly

 

Fiber is a plant substance that is required for a healthy diet. Lots of fiber is needed each day to help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve digestion, prevent constipation and maintain a healthy body weight.

Fiber can be found in fruits, whole grains and vegetables. Most adults should eat at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber every day; though the doctors say most people only eat about half as much. It’s best to slowly increase the fiber in your diet instead of piling it on all at once. A sudden increase in fiber intake can cause abdominal discomfort.

Fiber intake should be at least 14 grams per 1000 calories daily; higher fiber intake may improve glycemic control. Saturated fat should be less than 7 percent of calories and there should be minimal trans fat. Total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg daily.

There is an average fall of 1.2/1.3 mmHg blood pressure with average 10 gram intake of fiber.

Certain soluble fibers (psyllium, pectin, wheat dextrin and oat products) reduce bad LDL cholesterol. Every gram increase in soluble fiber reduces LDL cholesterol by an average of 2.2 mg/dL. The message is incorporation of greater amounts of fiber, in which carbohydrate is derived from unprocessed whole foods.