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Dr K K Aggarwal

Sitting over 3 hours a day may reduce life expectancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Sitting for three hours per day or longer may reduce an individual s life expectancy. A study calculated that limiting the time people spend sitting to 3 hours or fewer each day would increase the life expectancy of the population by two years. Cutting down TV watching to fewer than two hours each day would bump life expectancy up by another 1.4 years. When you are sitting your leg muscles are completely inactive which causes problems with how you handle your blood sugar and how you handle cholesterol.

Sitting over 3 hours a day may reduce life expectancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Sitting over 3 hours a day may reduce life expectancy

Sitting for three hours per day or longer may reduce an individual’s life expectancy. A study calculated that limiting the time people spend sitting to 3 hours or fewer each day would increase the life expectancy of the population by two years. Cutting down TV watching to fewer than two hours each day would bump life expectancy up by another 1.4 years.

When you are sitting, your leg muscles (the largest in the body) are completely inactive, which causes problems with how you handle your blood sugar and how you handle cholesterol.

Obesity reduces life expectancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Obesity in adulthood is associated with a striking reduction in life expectancy for both men and women. Among 3457 subjects in the Framingham Study, done in the United States, those who were obese (Body Mass Index or BMI ≥30 kg/m2 at age 40 years lived 6 to 7 years less than those who were not (BMI ≤24.9 kg/m2). Those who were overweight (BMI 25 to 29.9 km/m2) at age 40 years lived about 3 years less, and those who were both obese and smoked lived 13 to 14 years less than normal–weight nonsmokers. The steady rise in life expectancy during the past two centuries may come to an end because of the increasing prevalence of obesity. Being overweight during adolescence also increase the risk of premature death as an adult. The analysis of Nurses’ Health Study has shown the risk of premature death increases with higher BMIs at age 18 years. For a BMI at age 18 of 18.5 to 21.9, 22 to 24.9, 25 to 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, the hazard ratio for premature death were 0.98, 1.18, 1.66, and 2.79, respectively.

A prospective study from the United States, at National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, valuated the relationship between BMI and risk of death over a maximum follow–up period of 10 years among over 500,000 men and women aged 50 to 71 years. Among the subset of individuals 50 years of age (when prevalence of chronic disease is low) who had never smoked, an increased risk of death was associated with being either overweight (20 to 50 percent increase in those between 26.5 to 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (two– to over threefold increase in those ≥30 kg/m2).

Overweight and obesity, when analyzed together, is associated with increased mortality from diabetes and kidney disease. Obesity, when analyzed alone, is associated with increased cardiac mortality and cancers considered to be obesity–related (colon, breast, esophageal, uterine, ovarian, kidney, and pancreatic cancer), but not with mortality from other cancers or non–cardiac mortality.

There are some recent studies which showed that obese people live longer. Overweight was shown to be associated with reduced mortality from non cancer, non–cardiovascular causes, but not with cancer or cardiovascular mortality. In them being underweight was associated with increased mortality from non cancer and non–cardiac causes, but not cancer and cardiac CVD causes. Obesity and increased central fat are associated with increased morbidity in addition to mortality. Overweight and obese individuals have a higher relative risk of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus compared with normal weight individuals. The risk of hypertension and diabetes increases with increasing BMI.

In the Nurses’ Health and the Health Professionals studies, the risk of developing a chronic disease (gallstones, hypertension, heart disease, colon cancer and stroke (in men only)) increased with increasing BMI, even in those in the upper half of the healthy weight range (BMI 22.0 to 24.9 kg/m2). Obesity is measured by using a measurement called BMI, which is calculated by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters.

A BMI of 18.5 to 23 is considered normal (Asians). One below 18.5 is considered underweight and 25 or above is considered obese.

Obesity reduces life expectancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Obesity reduces life expectancy

Obesity in adulthood is associated with a striking reduction in life expectancy for both men and women. Among 3457 subjects in the Framingham Study, done in the United States, those who were obese (Body Mass Index or BMI =30 kg/m2 at age 40 years lived 6 to 7 years less than those who were not (BMI =24.9 kg/m2).

Those who were overweight (BMI 25 to 29.9 km/m2) at age 40 years lived about 3 years less, and those who were both obese and smoked lived 13 to 14 years less than normal–weight nonsmokers.

The steady rise in life expectancy during the past two centuries may come to an end because of the increasing prevalence of obesity.

Being overweight during adolescence also increase the risk of premature death as an adult. The analysis of Nurses’ Health Study has shown the risk of premature death increases with higher BMIs at age 18 years. For a BMI at age 18 of 18.5 to 21.9, 22 to 24.9, 25 to 29.9, and =30 kg/m2, the hazard ratio for premature death were 0.98, 1.18, 1.66, and 2.79, respectively.

A prospective study from the United States, at National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, valuated the relationship between BMI and risk of death over a maximum follow–up period of 10 years among over 500,000 men and women aged 50 to 71 years.

Among the subset of individuals 50 years of age (when prevalence of chronic disease is low) who had never smoked, an increased risk of death was associated with being either overweight (20 to 50 percent increase in those between 26.5 to 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (two– to over threefold increase in those =30 kg/m2).

Overweight and obesity, when analyzed together, is associated with increased mortality from diabetes and kidney disease.

Obesity, when analyzed alone, is associated with increased cardiac mortality and cancers considered to be obesity–related (colon, breast, esophageal, uterine, ovarian, kidney, and pancreatic cancer), but not with mortality from other cancers or non–cardiac mortality.

There are some recent studies which showed that obese people live longer. Overweight was shown to be associated with reduced mortality from non cancer, non–cardiovascular causes, but not with cancer or cardiovascular mortality. In them being underweight was associated with increased mortality from non cancer and non–cardiac causes, but not cancer and cardiac CVD causes.

Obesity and increased central fat are associated with increased morbidity in addition to mortality. Overweight and obese individuals have a higher relative risk of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus compared with normal weight individuals. The risk of hypertension and diabetes increases with increasing BMI.

In the Nurses’ Health and the Health Professionals studies, the risk of developing a chronic disease (gallstones, hypertension, heart disease, colon cancer and stroke (in men only)) increased with increasing BMI, even in those in the upper half of the healthy weight range (BMI 22.0 to 24.9 kg/m2).

Obesity is measured by using a measurement called BMI, which is calculated by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters.

A BMI of 18.5 to 23 is considered normal (Asians). One below 18.5 is considered underweight and 25 or above is considered obese.

You can smoke 10 Years of your Life Expectancy

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Two studies on smoking and mortality published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine have shown that quitting smoking helped to reduce the risk of death associated with smoking.

One study was led by Dr. Prabhat Jha of the Center for Global Health Research inToronto, while the other study was led by Michael J. Thun of the American Cancer Society.

Smokers lose at least one decade of life expectancy over nonsmokers on average.

Those who kick the habit before age 40 reduce the excess risk of death associated with continued smoking by about 90%.

Women are now as likely to die from smoking-related illnesses as men. In the early 1960s, women smokers were 2.73 times more likely to die from lung cancer than their nonsmoking counterparts; by 2010, they were 25.66 times more likely to die of the disease.