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Dr K K Aggarwal

Low cholesterol linked to stomach cancer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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People with very low cholesterol levels are at increased risk of developing stomach cancer.

The study involved 2,600 residents of Hisayama, Japan, who were followed for 14 years. Gastric cancers developed in 97 subjects. After accounting for age and gender, stomach cancer rates rose significantly with descending cholesterol level. For example, among subjects with the highest cholesterol levels, the gastric cancer rate was the equivalent of 2.1 cases per 1000 persons per year; among those with the lowest cholesterol, the rate was 3.9 per 1000 persons per year.

Patients with low serum cholesterol should consider periodic gastrointestinal examination for the prevention of stomach cancer.

Low cholesterol has been earlier linked to depression, anxiety and suicide in both men and women. Another earlier report has also shown that people with cholesterol level below 180 had twice the risk of brain hemorrhage as compared to those with cholesterol levels of 230.

Amiodarone linked to Cancer Risk in Men

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The risk of cancer is increased in men taking amiodarone particularly in those with extensive exposure to the drug as per a retrospective study. Among men taking amiodarone, the risk for any cancer rose by almost 20% compared with the general population, according to Chia–Jen Liu, MD, of National Yang–Ming University Hospital in Yilan, Taiwan, and colleagues. And for men whose cumulative defined daily doses in a year exceeded 180, the risk was 46% higher the researchers reported online in Cancer.

IBD linked to heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with increased risks for stroke, myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease, particularly in women.

A meta–analysis and systematic review has shown that increased odds for cerebrovascular accidents including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke –– and for ischemic heart disease according to Siddharth Singh, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

These risks are specifically elevated in women versus men, with women having a 28% increased odds of cerebrovascular events and a 26% increased odds of ischemic heart disease.

The study was presented in a poster presentation at the American College of Gastroenterology meeting in San Diego.

IBD linked to heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on IBD linked to heart disease

Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with increased risks for stroke, myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease, particularly in women.

A meta–analysis and systematic review has shown that increased odds for cerebrovascular accidents including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke –– and for ischemic heart disease according to Siddharth Singh, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and colleagues.

These risks are specifically elevated in women versus men, with women having a 28% increased odds of cerebrovascular events and a 26% increased odds of ischemic heart disease.

The study was presented in a poster presentation at the American College of Gastroenterology meeting in San Diego

DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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DPP–4 inhibitors not linked to increased heart attack risk: The Wall Street Journal reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that DPP–4 inhibitors may not be linked to an increased heart attack risk.

Extreme exercise may not pose danger to heart: The Wall Street Journal reported that a study of Tour de France cyclists found that they had longer lives than the general population and were less likely to die from heart troubles.

Faster heart attack care has not led to better in–hospital survival: USA Today reported that research published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that while hospitals have “shaved 16 minutes off the time it takes to get heart attack patients into treatment from 2005–2006 to 2008–2009, reducing that time from 83 minutes to 67 minutes,” investigators “found that the percentage of heart attack patients who die while in the hospital, about 5%, hasn’t changed.”

Gut bacteria may play role in determining weight: The investigators found that mice who received bacteria from the obese twin became fat, while the mice who received bacteria from lean individuals remained lean.

CDC: One in four deaths from cardiovascular disease preventable: USA Today reported currently, there are approximately 800,000 deaths annually in the US from cardiovascular disease, but about 200,000 of these deaths “could be prevented if people made healthy changes including stopping smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, doing more physical activity, eating less salt and managing their high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.