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Dr K K Aggarwal

Think differently in mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Lord Ganesha with the elephant’s head depicts that one should use their wisdom before taking any decision.
  • Vishnu’s first incarnation, fish, symbolizes learning to swim in the opposite direction.
  • Brahma’s five heads denote using all your five senses before taking any decision.
  • Shiva’s third eye means to think differently in difficulties.
  • Ravan’s ten heads mean using your ten senses/emotions before taking any decision. But, Ravan used them for negative forces.
  • Maha Mrityunjaya mantra begins as we worship the three-eyed Shiva.
  • Gayatri mantra means that one should ask the heart to direct the intellect to take the right decision. The 3H philosophy is linked to the same. The first H is ask the head for options; second H is to ask the heart to choose one of the options and the third H means to order the hand to do the action

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized by living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolize how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

• Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind the two is that one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.

• Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.

• Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on a Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge, one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.

• Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on the elephant Airavat symbolizes that intellect (Indra) for its development requires control over Masti and madness (elephant).

• Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman, one must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).

• Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us, which is not to get befooled.

• Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat the unbalanced food.

• Krishna riding five horses means one need to control our five senses.

• Kartikeya riding on Peacock symbolizes that one should learn to control one’s pride (vanity) or ego.

• The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides a Mesha (ram). Kubera, the God of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.

• Yamraj rides a buffalo, which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the God of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed, which means to kill that animal tendency within ourselves. For example, during exams, you need to kill your goat behavior, which is known to possess excessive sexual desires. You may need to control them throughout the year but during exams you need to kill them. In Kali Pooja, a buffalo is sacrificed, which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

Wahans (Vehicles) In Mythology

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In mythological era, the negative tendency of a man is symbolized with the animal nature. Also Gods in Indian mythology are symbolized by living a positive behavior. Every God has been given a vehicle or Wahan. Both God and the Wahan symbolized how to live a positive life and how to control the animal tendencies.

Following are a few examples:

1. Lord Ganesha rides a Mouse. Mouse in mythology is symbolized with greed and Ganesha with one who removes obstacles. The spiritual meaning behind both is – one should learn to control greed to tackle obstacles in life.

2. Lord Shiva riding Nandi (Bull is symbolized with uncontrolled sexual desires) and the duo signifies that for learning meditation, one needs to control sexual desires first.

3. Saraswati (the goddesses of knowledge) sitting on Swan symbolizes that to acquire knowledge one must learn to control the power of discrimination or Vivek. Swan can drink milk and leave water from a mixture of milk and water.

4.  Indra (the one who has a complete control over the intellect) riding on Elephant Airavat is symbolized that intellect (Indra) for its development requires a control over Masti and madness (Elephant).

5. Durga (the perfect woman) riding a lion symbolizes that to become a perfect woman must learn to control her agitation or aggression (lion).

6. Lakshmi (wealth) riding an owl symbolizes that to earn righteously, one must learn to control Owl like properties within us which is not to get befooled.

7. Lord Vishnu (the doer) riding eagle or Garuda (Eagles are opportunistic predators which means they eat almost anything they can find) means controlling your desires to eat the unbalanced food.

8.Krishna riding five horses means one need to control ones five senses

9.  Kartikey rising on Peacock symbolizes that should learn to control one pride (vanity) his ego.

10. The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Goat also signifies uncontrolled sexual desires but lesser than the bull.

11. Yamraj is riding a buffalo which is known for its rampant destruction. Lord Yama or Yamraja is referred to as the god of death, twin brother, lord of justice, Dharma Raja. One can do justice only if one has a control over anger and aggressive behavior.

12. In mythology, apart from Wahans, animals are also shown to be sacrificed which means to kill that animal tendency within himself. For example, during exams, you need to kill your goat behavior which is known to possess excessive sexual desires. You may need to control them throughout the year but during exam you need to kill them. In Kali ki Pooja, buffalo or Bhainsa is sacrificed which again means that in extreme situations, you may need to kill your ego or anger.

Lord Ganesha is shown with big tummy and craving for eating sweets (ladoo or modakas) and puffed rice.

Both sweets and rice are addicting in nature and consuming them regularly can lead to metabolic syndrome which presents with diabetes and high blood pressure. In Hindu mythology for this reason it is said to avoid eating carbohydrates atleast once in a week.

Ganesha is in each one of us depicting our inherent weakness for eating carbohydrates.  To prevent metabolic syndrome Ganesha is shown to consume Bilva leaves, Durva grass juice, fruits of elephant apple and Jamun, all having anti diabetic and insulin sensitizing properties.

Ganesha is also shown to be eating puffed rice and not plain rice. Puffed rice is a safer carbohydrate than plain rice.

The importance of puffed rice is mentioned in many places in mythology. The main mention comes in Kubera Ganesha interaction in one of the Purana (Vedic message in the form of stories) story.

Kubera (the god of wealth) became proud of his wealth and invited child Ganesha for a meal. Ganesha increased his appetite so much that there was nothing else to eat. When Kubera made Shiva to intervene, Shiva gave Ganesha a handful of puffed rice, which he ate, and immediately his hunger was suppressed.

This teaches us two Vedic lessons. Firstly that handful of puffed rice given with love and eaten with devotion is more important and filling than all the wealth of Kubera flaunted to impress others.

Secondly that a man of perfection (Ganesha) has an endless appetite for experiences. Lord Shiva, the perfect Guru, alone can satisfy the hunger of such devotee by giving them a handful of “puffed rice”, representing the “baked vasanas”, burnt in the fire of knowledge’. Only when the lust is burnt up the enthusiasm for experiencing life is quietened.

The spiritual message is that one should learn to control the lust and burn it in the fire of knowledge.

In mythology the symbolic representation of rice is for lust (attachments, desires and greed) and puffed rice for baked lust.   Rice is equated to lust being a carbohydrate with high glycemic index and proneness to obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Apart from carbohydrates lust can also be for sex, cigarettes, alcohol and narcotics. The answer for any lust is either to discard the lust or to think before getting indulging in it.

Medically also puffed rice is better than plain rice. Puffed rice or murmura is to rice what popcorn is to maze. Puffed rice however lacks the essential amino acid lysine and therefore is not a complete meal by itself. It is about 10 times the volume of regular rice. A cup of plain puffed rice contains only 20-25 calories. Puffed rice is recommended healthy snack and healthy fast food for preventing diabetes. It is light, dry and gives a feeling of fullness. It is also gluten-free.

In mythology puffed rice has been mentioned at many other places also.

1.When Sudama went to meet Krishna he carried puffed rice as a gift which Krishna relished. Puffed rice indicates a healthy gift and that only a person who has controlled his lust can meet Krishna the consciousness.

2.Ramakrishna has been mentioned having his first spiritual ecstasy at the age of six or seven while eating puffed rice. Spiritually again it means that only those can achieve spiritual ecstasy who have mastered lust.

3.In marriage rituals also both bride and groom are required to offer puffed rice into the fire. The spiritual message is again that both groom and bride need to leave their lust before they enter into a new relationship. This is again shown in another marriage ritual Laaja Homam where the bride with the assistance of her brothers makes offerings of puffed rice into the sacred fire.

4.In Buddhist mythology puffed rice also depicts the end “one who cannot be reborn” and puffed rice is used at funerals. Puffed rice represents rice that cannot be grown again.

Today the developing world is facing an epidemic of potbelly obesity related diabetes and the same has been linked to eating refined carbohydrates eespecially refined sugar.

Lord Ganesha is depicted with big tummy and sweet (laddo) in his one of the hands and yet he never suffered from diabetes.

 There are two interpretations of the same. The first one is spiritual interpretation and that is that in mythology Ganesha depicts principles of stress management and sweet laddo means control of desires. Big tummy symbolizes retaining all information gathered from hearing with two big elephant ears.

 The second is a medical interpretation where the big tummy represents proneness of Indians to metabolic syndrome, the present epidemic related to abdominal obesity. Indians have both weakness for eating sweet and proneness for developing pot belly obesity.

 This is shown as uncontrolled desires to eat sweet (Ladoo) and the prevention of the same are shown by all the fruits or leaves offered to Ganesha having anti diabetic properties.

 The main Ganesha Mantra can also be interpreted as explaining anti diabetes properties of Ganesha offerings.

 “Gajananam Bhoota Ganadi Sevitam; Kapittha Jambu phalasara bhakshitam; Umasutam Shoka Vinasha karanam; Namami Vighneswara pada pankajam”.

 The Mantra means

a.  “Oh Elephant-faced, worshiped by the existing beings, of all living beings, tasting the elephant apple (kaith) and jambolana (jamun), the Son of Uma, destroyer of grief, I bow to the lotus feet of Ganesha who is lord of all.”

b.  Or  Gajananam ( the big tummy one worshipped by all) Bhoota (Durva grass and Bilva patra used for worshipping Ganesha) Ganadi ( in equal quantity)  Sevitam (if consumed); Kapittha (Kaith ) Jambu ( Jamun) phalasara (fruits)  bhakshitam (to be consumed); Umasutam ( son of Uma) Shoka ( diseases) Vinasha karanam (get rid of); Namami ( I bow to ) Vighneswara ( destroyer of grief) pada pankajam ( feet of lord)”

 The mantra talks about four medicinal herbs: Durva grass and Bilva patra ( Bel leaves) used for Ganesha worship; fruit of elephant apple (Kaith) and fruit of Jambolona ( or Jamun). All four have anti diabetic properties and can be mixed in equal quantity and prepared as a medicinal juice.

 Medically Durva grass (Cynodon dactylon) has been shown to possess anti diabetic, cholesterol owering, immune-modulatory, DNA protective, aphrodisiac, male fertility, anti cancer and anti inflammatory activities. Similarly Bilva Patra has both anti diabetic and fertility promoting properties.

 Elephant apple (Limonia acidissima) also named as Wood Apple, Elephant Apple, Monkey Fruit, Curd Fruit, Koth Bel, Kaitha  and Kath Bel, has been shown to possess strong anti diabetic properties.

 Jamun (Syzygium cumini) also has DNA protective, anti oxidant and anti diabetic properties and is an essential ingredient of most anti diabetic Ayurveda preparations.

Worth trying: To prevent diabetes and to reduce the ill effects of metabolic syndrome regularly take equal mixed quantity of Durva grass, Kaith fruit and Jamun fruit juices.

Note: This article is authors personal interpretation based on listening to many Ayurveda experts.

Was Lord Ganesha Born Of A Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Transplant?

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Today West claims that they can make human bladder tissue from the human skin cells. But was not lord Ganesha created by Parvati from the dirt of her body? The dirt from allopathic point of view would equate to the cells of her skin. In today’s terms Ganesha birth can be explained as the origin of stem cell baby birth in the literature.

First identified in the hematopoietic blood system stem cells are present in many other tissues.  All stem cells are capable of self-renewal and they can differentiate.

Self-renewal is the ability to proliferate without the loss of differentiation potential and without undergoing biologic aging. Stem cells can divide symmetrically (in which both daughter cells are either stem cells or differentiated cells) or asymmetrically (yielding both a stem cell and a more differentiated cell)

Stem cells can be either totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent, or unipotent. Totipotent cells can produce all cell types (embryonic and extra embryonic placenta). Pluripotent cells can only make cells of the embryo proper. Multipotent cells can only make cells within a given germ layer. Unipotent cells make cells of a single cell type.

In 2006 Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues introduced genes expressed in pluripotent cells into mature cells by a process, called reprogramming and induced a pluripotent state in a previously differentiated cell type. These cells are now called induced pluripotent cells (iPS).

iPS technology has revolutioned science today. A keratinocyte derived from the skin can be induced to become a pluripotent stem cell. Also a cell taken from an individual can be induced to become a cell type capable of forming any other cell type. A skin obtained from a patient with a degenerative brain disorder is now used as a drug after getting converted into a pluripotent cell.

Today the recognition that a cell taken from an individual can be induced to become pluripotent (a cell type capable of forming any other cell type in that individual’s body) has provided unprecedented opportunities for regenerative medicine.

Today most easily accessible patient cell types, such as skin fibroblasts or blood cells are being reprogrammed to iPS.

Theoretically therefore it is possible to make any tissue from iPS.  That means the skin cells can make liver, brain, heart or I fact the whole baby.

It looks that this technology claimed by the Western scientists of converting skin cell into iPS cell was available in our Vedic era and the birth of Ganesha by Parvati might have been an example of the first human baby made from the skin iPS.