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Dr K K Aggarwal

Rakshabandhan to Janmashtami

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Rakhi is generally recognized as a celebration of a bond of love between brother and a sister. But how many of us have actually thought about what this tie entails? Rakhi is synonymous with purity of the relationship and purity of the self and consequently of the soul. It is not merely a thread tied on the brother’s wrist by the sister whereby the brother pledges to protect her from any worldly harm. In a broader spectrum, it is a chance to free oneself from one’s internal enemies – the vices, especially the lust including the sexual one. A man is pulled down by his negative energies and Rakhi gives him a chance to retrospect and pull out of that dark side. Eight days after Rakhi we celebrate Janmashtami. The sacred thread tied during Raksha Bandhan connects us to Janmashtami, when we celebrate the birth of Lord Krishna. In this period of eight days between ‘Purnima’ and ‘Ashtami’ we get a chance of cleansing and purifying our soul and subsequently getting reborn again. This seven-day period, symbolic of the time taken for creation of the world by God can be likened to a recreation of the self by us. This period is to be seen as a time for penance when all negativism is purged to achieve the level of pure spirit. Needless to say, all forms of ‘spiritual downers’ should be abstained from, so that a hindrance free communion with the soul is made possible. In fact an ideal gift to one’s sister can be the shedding of a strong vices in that person. The message of Rakshabandhan is that of love and purity. We can see it as a thread tied on behalf of God to set us on Godly ways. The initial representation of Rakhi as a pledge to protect the sister and her right to be protected by the brother has gained wide propagation due to the fact that in Indian history and mythology there have been instances when this facet of tying a thread on a man’s wrist has been highlighted. Rani Padmavati sent a Rakhi to a Muslim king to ask for help when she was besieged by enemies. In the realm of the Gods, we have Indrani tying a Rakhi on Lord Indra. There is also the tradition of tying Rakhi by a Brahmin to a Yajman. The connection between Rakshabandhan and Janmashtami is highlighted keeping in view the spiritual aspect of man’s life, which is the ladder that helps him to achieve oneness with God. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views.

The Science behind Training and Development

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Training in any field requires gaining knowledge, skills and positive mental attitude towards the object of learning.

Knowledge is everything about what and why. In Yoga, it correlates with the Gyan (Gnana) Marg. Skill is all about how to do it and correlates with Karma Marg.

The positive mental attitude is linked to willingness to do any work or in other words one’s Astha in that action. In Yoga, it is synonymous with Bhakti Marg.

In Bhagwad Gita, Lord Krishna talks about all the principles of management including how to train and develop an individual.

The development teaches and increases one’s intelligence quotient (IQ), physical quotient (PQ), emotional quotient (EQ) and moral quotient (MQ).

Who is a Good Teacher?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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A good teacher is the one who follows the principles of listening first, teaching in detail till confusion arises and then teaching with reasoning while going into the minutest details and finally summarizing the ‘take–home’ messages.

This is how Lord Krishna discoursed to Arjuna in Bhagavad Gita. In the first chapter, he only listens, in the second, he gives detailed counseling and from chapters 2 to 17, he gives reasoning and in 18th chapter, he revises

Lord Krishna – The Great Teacher and Healer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Lord Krishna was a great teacher and a healer. He gave perfect counseling to Arjuna when he was in the state of acute anxiety, confusion, indecisiveness and depression. His supreme knowledge, skills and understanding of human relationship were responsible for convincing Arjuna that he had to perform his duty, regardless of who his opponents were.

There are basic principles to be learnt from the teachings of Bhagavad Gita, if one wants to get to the right state of mental and physical strength.

• The 1st principle is to listen, listen and listen. In the first chapter of Bhagavad Gita, Krishna only listened when Arjuna spoke. One must learn to listen to others. Out of 18 counseling sessions (the 18 chapters of Gita), one full session was devoted only to listening to Arjuna. Almost 50% of the emotions of a person are out once he has spoken to the Healer about his or her problems.

• The 2nd principle is to remain non-judgmental while listening. This is beautifully described in Chapter 2 shloka 10. While listening, Krishna did not show any signs of anger to Arjuna even at those extremely difficult moments. On the contrary, He kept on smiling and listened patiently. This is another avenue where most of the healthcare workers fail in their relationship with the patients. We (doctors) sometimes become annoyed with the patients because they narrate unrelated details of their health problems. We need to understand and appreciate their predicaments.

• The 3rd principle is that every answer should be validated by reasoning. Throughout the 18 counseling sessions between Arjuna and Krishna that included 700 question and answers, Krishna gave proper reasoning, either experiential or based on sound logic. He never forced Arjuna to believe in what He was saying without getting convinced about it.

• The 4th principle is that of reassurance. Krishna re-assures Arjuna on two occasions. Firstly, when he said that “I’ll appear whenever there is adharma” meaning thereby that whenever there is injustice someone will come and set it right. As a Healer, the doctor should convincingly say that “wherever there is a disease I will be there”. In Chapter 18 shloka 65, Krishna says that anyone who takes conscious decision and interprets things with full devotion, there is no reason why he or she should not become happy or healthy. He again assures Arjuna that he is going to be successful.

• The 5th principle is depicted in the last shloka of Gita (18.78), which summarizes the importance of a good doctor-patient (teacher-student) relationship where Sanjay says to Dhritrashtra that when there is a Healer like Krishna and a patient like Arjuna, there is no reason why there will not be a victory.

Lord Krishna – The Great Teacher and Healer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Lord Krishna – The Great Teacher and Healer

Lord Krishna was a great teacher and a healer. He gave perfect counseling to Arjuna when he was in the state of acute anxiety, confusion, indecisiveness and depression. His supreme knowledge, skills and understanding of human relationship were responsible for convincing Arjuna that he has to perform his duty, regardless of who his opponents are.

There are basic principles to be learnt from the teachings of Bhagavad Gita to get, if one wants, to the right state of mental and physical strength.

  • The 1st principle is listen, listen and listen. In the first chapter of Bhagavad Gita, Krishna only listened to Arjuna. One must learn to listen to others. Out of 18 counseling sessions (the 18 chapters of Gita), one full session was devoted only to listening to Arjuna. Fifty percent of the emotion of a person is out once he has spoken to the Healer about his or her problems.
  • The 2nd principle is to remain non-judgmental while listening. This is beautifully described in Chapter 2 shloka 10. While listening, Krishna did not show any signs of anger to Arjuna even at those extremely difficult moments. On the contrary, He kept on smiling and listened patiently. This is another avenue where most of the healthcare workers fail in their relationship with the patients. We (doctors) sometimes become annoyed with the patients because they narrate unrelated details of their health problems. We need to understand and appreciate their predicaments.
  • The 3rd principle is that every answer should be validated by reasoning. Throughout 18 counseling sessions between Arjuna and Krishna incorporating 700 question and answers, Krishna gave proper reasoning, either experiential or based on sound logic. He never forced Arjuna to believe in what He was saying without getting convinced about it.
  • The 4th principle is that of reassurance. Krishna re-assures Arjuna on two occasions. Firstly, when he said that “I’ll appear whenever there is adharma” meaning thereby that whenever there is injustice someone will come and set it right. As a Healer, the doctor should convincingly say that “wherever there is a disease I will be there”. In Chapter 18 shloka 65, Krishna says that anyone who takes conscious decision and interprets things with full devotion, there is no reason why he or she should not become happy or healthy. He again assures Arjuna that he is going to be successful.
  • The 5th principle is depicted in the last shloka of Gita (18.78), which summarizes the importance of a good doctor-patient (teacher-student) relationship where Sanjay says to Dhritrashtra that when there is a Healer like Krishna and a patient like Arjuna, there is no reason why there will not be a victory.

Why do we adore Tulsi?

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Yanmule sarvatirhaani
Yannagre sarvadevataa
Yanmadhye sarvavedaascha
Tulsi taam namaamyaham

I bow down to the tulsi, At whose base are all the holy places, At whose top reside all the deities and In whose middle are all the Vedas.

There is a Sanskrit saying about tulsi: “tulanaa naasti athaiva tulsi” that which is incomparable in its qualities is the tulsi.

It is one of the most sacred plants. It is the only pooja samigri which can be washed and reused.

Satyabhama once weighed Lord Krishna against all her legendary wealth. The scales did not balance till a single tulsi leaf was placed along with the wealth on the scale by Rukmini with devotion. Thus tulsi played the vital role of demonstrating that even a small object offered with devotion is more important than all the wealth in the world.

Tulsi symbolizes Goddess Lakshmi. Those who wish to be righteous and have a happy family life worship the tulsi. Tulsi is married to the Lord with all pomp and show as in any wedding. This is because according to another legend, the Lord blessed her to be His consort.
Tulsi leaf has great medicinal value and is used to cure various ailments, including the common cold. It has detoxifying properties and is used in all spiritual fasts including the satynarayana katha where 1000 tulsi leaves are added to the water for pooja and later consumption.
1. Tulsi is added in every charnamrat (holy Prasad) as it has anti septic properties and the Prasad does not get infected.
2. Tulsi vivah (marriage) starts the marriage season in Kartik month. Tulsi seeds are known to induce and promote fertility.

Peacock In Mythology

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In Hindu mythology peacock is the vahan or the vehicle of Karthikeya and the Buddhist Goddess Mahamayuri.

In imagery Lord Krishna is always represented wearing a peacock feather tucked in his headband. Ma Saraswati is also depicted with a peacock standing on the side.

Traditionally peacock is a symbol of vastness (beauty), peace and poise (santulan).

Peacock mating season coincides with the onset of Shravan month with the start of monsoon and coincides with the onset of Chaturmas and Dakshinayana, a period of negativity of the mind.

Peacock symbolizes keeping ones vanity under control. Vanity is the excessive belief in one’s own abilities or attractiveness to others. It also means boasting in vain or unjustified boasting.

Karthikeya or the one who has control over his six senses ( five senses and the mind), depicted by six heads, riding on the peacock means that without having control over once vanity or pride one cannot win over the senses.

Peacock by the side of Saraswati also means that while learning (vast subject, blue colour) one must keep the vanity away.

Mahamayuri is one of the Wisdom Kings in the Buddhist Pantheon. She is a peaceful personification, in contrast to the wrathful attitudes of male personifications of the Wisdom Kings. She has the power to protect devotees from poisoning, either physical or spiritual. Peacock eats snakes also symbolize controlling once ego.

Lord Ram taught us to fight for personal rights. When his wife was abducted by Ravana, he fought to bring his wife back.

Lord Krishna, on the other hand, fought first part of life during childhood for personal and family rights and killed Kansa but in his later part of life, fought for others.  In Mahabharata, he helped Yudhishthir and his brothers to get back the kingdom and take revenge of their wife’s ( Draupadi) insult.

 Lord Buddha, on the other hand, worked for the welfare of the society.

Lord Ram had a personal enemy. Lord Krishna had personal enemy only in the first part of his life, in the later part,Krishnahad no enemy. Lord Buddha had no enemy altogether.

Out of ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu, Ram is 7th, Krishna is 8th and Buddha is 9th.

The evaluation of Avtar means that your life starts with your personal achievements and then you start working for others and then for the society.

 First you learn to take care of your needs, followed by that of others and finally of the society.

 Ramayana and Mahabharata, Rama killing Ravana indicate killing the ego of the self;Krishnahelping killing Duryodhana means helping killing the ego of others and Buddha means creating a egoless society.

In terms of internal

The above interpretation is my own and has nothing to do with hurting sentiments of any religion.

Lord Krishna was a great teacher and a healer. He gave perfect counseling to Arjuna when he was in the state of acute anxiety, confusion, indecisiveness and depression. His supreme knowledge, skills and understanding of human relationship were responsible for convincing Arjuna that he has to perform his duty, regardless of who his opponents are.

There are basic principles which one must learn from teachings of Bhagavad Gita to get, if one wants, to the right state of mental and physical strength.

1. The 1st principle is listen, listen and listen. In the first chapter of Bhagavad Gita from Krishna only listened to Arjuna. One must learn to listen to others. Out of 18 counseling sessions which Krishna took with Arjuna, one full session was devoted only to listening to Arjuna. Fifty percent of the emotion of a person is out once he has spoken to the Healer about his or her problems.

2. 2nd principle is to remain non-judgmental while listening. This is beautifully described in Chapter 2 shloka 10. While listening, Krishna did not show any signs of anger to Arjuna even at those extremely difficult moments. On the contrary, Krishna kept on smiling and listened patiently. This is another avenue where most of the healthcare workers fail in their relationship with the patients. We (doctors) sometimes become annoyed with the patients because they narrate unrelated details of their health problems. We need to understand and appreciate their predicaments.

3. 3rd principle is that every answer should be validated by reasoning. Throughout 18 counseling sessions between Arjuna and Krishna incorporating 700 question and answers, Arjuna was given proper reasoning, either experiential or based on sound logic. Krishna never forced Arjuna to believe in what He was saying without getting convinced about it.

4. 4th principle is that of reassurance. Krishna re-assures Arjuna on two occasions. Firstly, when he said that “I’ll appear whenever there is adharma” meaning thereby that whenever there is injustice someone will come and set it right. In terms of a Healer the doctor should convincingly say that wherever there is a disease I will be there”. Again in Chapter 18 shloka 65, Krishna says that anyone who takes conscious decision and interprets things with full devotion, there is no reason why he or she should not become happy or healthy. He again assures Arjuna that he is going to be successful.

5. 5th principle is depicted in the last shloka of Gita (18.78) which summarizes the importance of a good doctor-patient (teacher-student) relationship where Sanjay says to Dhriharashtra that when there is a Healer like Krishna and a patient like Arjuna, there is no reason why there will not be a victory.