Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

The Science behind eating Khichdi in Paush Month

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on The Science behind eating Khichdi in Paush Month

  • It is wet winter full of fog and smog.
  • From Ayurveda point of view, Kapha is aggravating, Vata is accumulating and Pitta is at its minimum.
  • The food intake should therefore contain Kapha-pacifying foods, which are light, easily digestible, hot, warm and Pitta increasing, so that they can increase the digestive fire to digest.
  • One of the main foods is eating Khichidi or a mix of brown rice and lentils /moong daal/ or bajara khichd
  • Khichdi or lentil rice mix is light to eat and digest.
  • In Allopathy terms when we eat proteins it must contain all essential amino acids. Normally foods from animal sources, such as meat, eggs and dairy products, are complete proteins. Soy and quinoa are the only two plant-based protein sources that provide complete protein. Incomplete protein sources lack one or more of the essential amino acids.

The essential amino acid deficit of one plant food can be overcome by combining it with a complementary plant food that provides adequate amounts of the limited essential amino acid.

As an example, grains (rice) are low in the essential amino acid lysine and high in methionine, whereas legumes (lentils, pulses, beans) are low in methionine and high in lysine. Peanuts are another complementary protein for rice.

Pairing complete proteins, such as milk, soya, meat, fish or eggs with incomplete proteins like brown rice also provides complete protein. Rice and dal is therefore eaten with curd as a tradition.

You don’t need to consume complementary proteins at the same meal, but you do need to consume them in the same day. The adequacy of protein intake is determined by the total quantity of protein and amino acids from the variety of foods consumed during the day.

  • Khichidi gives energy. All Gods are worshipped in this season with this food. In khichidi Rice and pulses should be in ratio of 1:2.
  • Bajra khichdi is another favorite food item in this month. It is health-friendly as it has complex non refined carbs. To balance it is served with desi ghee to take away its dry effect.
  • To make it equivalent to 56 bhog of winter, heeng, saunth (garam masala has less saunth), peepali, mirch, ajwain, javitri and jaiphal are added.
  • Bajra khichidi is usually eaten with garlic (counters constipation), less butter/ghee.
  • It is also eaten with garlic chatni, or amla chatni ( both are good for the heart)
  • In constipation: eat khichdi with curd, salad, white butter, ghee

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Tips to prevent anemia from becoming severe during pregnancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent anemia from becoming severe during pregnancy

  1. Eat iron-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, dried beans and fortified grains. The form of iron in meat products, called heme, is more easily absorbed than the iron in vegetables. If you are anemic and you ordinarily eat meat, increasing the amount of meat you consume is the easiest way to increase the iron your body receives.
  2. Eat foods high in folic acid, such as dried beans, dark green leafy vegetables, wheat germ and orange juice.
  3. Eat vitamin C-rich foods such as citrus fruits and fresh, raw vegetables.
  4. Cook in cast iron pots as this can add up to 80% more iron to your food.
  5. Take your prenatal multivitamin and mineral pill which contains extra folate.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on What type of a vegetarian are you?

There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

  1. Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood
  2. Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood
  3. Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood
  4. Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on What type of a vegetarian are you?

There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

  1. Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood

  2. Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood

  3. Ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood

  4. Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey.

Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

What type of a vegetarian are you?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on What type of a vegetarian are you?

There are 4 main types of vegetarian diets:

• A Lacto–ovo–vegetarian consumes dairy products and eggs but no meat, poultry, or seafood

• A Lacto–vegetarian eats dairy products but not eggs, meat, poultry, or seafood

• An ovo–vegetarian eats eggs but no dairy products, meat, poultry, or seafood

• A Vegan does not eat any animal products, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products; many vegans will also avoid honey. Vegetarian and plant–based diets are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancers as well as increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fats, particularly saturated fats and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, and together with the absence of red meat, this type of eating plan may provide many benefits for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Women who eat lot of meat are prone to weight gain

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Women who eat lot of meat are prone to weight gain

Women who eat a lot of meat are apt to weigh more than those who do not. Previous studies have consistently shown that vegetarians are lighter and have a lower body mass index than their omnivorous counterparts.

A study from Brigham Young evaluated 284 premenopausal women, an average of 40 years old and did not smoke. The researchers separated the women into groups classified by low, moderate, and high meat intake per 1,000 calories consumed per day.

Over the 7–day study, the investigators found that the low–intake group ate less than 1.9 three–ounce servings of meat per day, as opposed to more than 3.18 servings for the high–intake group.

More than half (52.8%) of the women classified as having a high meat intake were obese, defined in this study as having greater than 35% body fat. Conversely, 37.3% of women in the moderate meat intake group were obese and only 15.6% of those in the low meat intake group were obese.

This was a cross–sectional study, so the findings do not show that meat causes obesity, while that could be the case, it could also be that obesity caused women to eat more meat – like more obese women following the Atkins diet, which is rich in meat.

There are a number of physiological mechanisms by which meat could fuel weight gain. Meat proteins may elevate insulin levels, and thereby growth factors, that could influence weight and percent body fat. It has also been shown that consumption of saturated fat – most of which comes from animal products – is associated with obesity.

It may be worth recognizing that eating less meat may be beneficial in a weight management program. It is possible to eat a healthy diet that is limited in meat. Alternative protein sources such as, lentils, nuts and legumes can provide sufficient protein and actually be beneficial in dieting.