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Dr K K Aggarwal

Meditation can change genes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The Amarnath cave was chosen by Lord Shiva to narrate the secrets of meditation, immortality and creation of Universe to Parvati.

A spiritual journey requires a spiritual frame of mind and a commitment of 7-10 days for self-purification. Most spiritual destinations are located at up into mountains to provide a pollution free environment and involve a difficult travel so that nobody can reach the destination before 7-10 days. This duration helps in controlling the mind, intellect, ego and getting rid of the desires, attachments and greed. On the path of spiritual journey as one is travelling alone without carrying the worldly attachments, one invariably reaches the destination in a positive state of mind and in a meditative phase to experience the truth of life and answers to unanswered questions.

The Amarnath StoryOnce Parvati asked Shiva to let her know why and when he started wearing the beads of heads (Mund Mala). Shiva said whenever you are born I add one more head in my beads. Parvati said,” My Lord, my body is destroyed every time and I die again and again, but you are Immortal. Please let me know the secret of this.” Shiva replied that it is due to Amar Katha.”

Spiritual SignificanceThe spiritual significance of the above is, that here Shiva represents the Soul and Parvati the Body. The soul never dies and is immortal. The soul is the energized filed of information and in computer language is like the web of energized information. Every time any work is done (sanskara) a copy of the same is kept in the memory in both the soul and the spirit.

The further part of the story is the katha or the process of doing meditation and its benefits

The story“Parvati insisted that she may be told that secret. For long Shiva continued postponing. Finally on consistent demand He made up his mind to tell the immortal secret. He started for lonely place where no living being could listen it. He chose Amarnath Cave.”

Spiritual SignificanceThe first principle of learning how to meditate is dedication and persistence. Second is silence or a place with no internal and external disturbance. In ashtanga yoga, it is called Pratyahara (the withdrawal of senses).

The story“Shiva left His Nandi (The Bull) at Pahalgam or Bail Gaon; his moon from his hair (jata) at Chandanwari; his snake at the banks of Lake Sheshnag; his Son Ganesha at Mahagunas Parvat (Mahaganesh Hill) and his five elements at Panjtarni.

As a symbol of sacrificing the earthly world Shiva and Parvati did Tandav dance. After leaving behind all these, Shiva enters the Holy Amarnath Cave along with Parvati. Lord Shiva takes his Samadhi on the Deer Skin and concentrate.”

Spiritual SignificanceIn the process of meditation, one first gets rid of desires (Bull Nandi or the mind), discriminating, expectations and power of analyzing thoughts (moon or the intellect) and ego (snake). Once that is done one is away from the worldly desires totally (Ganesh and finally the five elements). Now the body is in symphony with the soul (Tandava dance).

The story“To ensure that no living being is able to hear the Immortal Tale, Shiva created Rudra named Kalagni and ordered him to spread fire to eliminate every living thing in and around the Holy Cave. After this He started narrating the secret of immortality to Parvati. But as a matter of chance one egg which was lying beneath the Deer skin remained protected. It is believed to be non-living and more over it was protected by Shiva-Parvati Asan (Bed). The pair of pigeons which were born out of this egg became immortal having listened the secret of immortality (Amar Katha).”

Spiritual SignificanceIt again signifies the importance of undisturbed state of mind at the time of meditation. Fire indicates the internally meditation generated spiritual fire or agni which burns all the negative thoughts and negative energies. The egg of the pigeon indicates that spiritual knowledge can transform at the level DNA. It also tells us that those who are sitting near the meditating persons also get benefitted.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Why Do We Close Our Eyes For Meditation?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Whenever we pray, think of God, undertake an internal healing procedure, make love, kiss someone, or meditate, we automatically close our eyes. It is a common Vedic saying that the soul resides in the heart and all the feelings are felt at the level of heart.

Most learning procedures in meditation involves sitting in an erect, straight posture,  closing the eyes, withdrawing from the world and concentrating on the object of concentration. Yoga Sutra of Patanjali describes pratihara (withdrawal of senses) as one of the seven limbs of yoga, Yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, pratihara, dharma, dhyana and Samadhi.

After pranayama, one needs to withdraw from the world and the senses and then start dhyana on the object of concentration. The process of pratihara becomes easy and is initiated with the closing of the eyes.

The inward journey starts with the detachment of the body from the external world and in yogic language, it is called Kayotsarga.

In the initiation of hypnosis also, a person is asked to lie down, look at the roof and withdraw from the world. He is then asked to gently roll the eyeball up until he goes into a trans. Upward rolling of the eyeballs has the same physiological significance as that of closing the eyes.

When we close our eyes, there is a suppression of sympathetic nervous system and activation of parasympathetic nervous system. During this period, blood pressure and pulse reduces and skin resistance goes up. A person goes into a progressive phase of internal and muscular relaxation.

The inward journey is a journey towards restful alertness where the body is restful yet the consciousness is alert. The intention is to relax the body and then the attention is focused on the object of concentration. Most visualization and meditation techniques involve closing of the eyes.

By detaching from the external stimuli, one suppresses the activities of the five senses and shifts ones awareness from disturbed to undisturbed state of consciousness. The inner journey helps in producing a state of ritam bhara pragya where the inner vibrations of the body become in symphony with the vibrations of the nature.

People who visit Vaishno Devi by traveling long distances on foot enter the cave and as soon as they see the darshan of Maa Vaishno Devi they close their eyes. This is natural and instant. Because Maa Vaishno Devi is not felt in the murti but her presence is felt in the heart and that presence can only be felt by closing the eyes.

Most yogic techniques like shavasana, yoga nidra, body-mind relaxation, progressive muscular relaxation, hypnosis involves closing the eyes in the very first step. Daytime nap is also incomplete without closing the eyes. Shok sabha and 2 minutes maun sabha are also practiced with the eyes closed. When we think of someone or try to remember something, the body automatically closes the eyes and one starts exploring the hidden memories. For recalling anything one must withdraw from the external world through its five senses.

Only advanced yogis or rishis acquire the power where with eyes opened they are in a state of ritambhara pragya. These yogic powers are acquired by practicing advanced sutra meditation for hours, days and years.  Lord Shiva has been shown in a meditative pose sitting on Kailash Parvat with the eyes semi opened. But for ordinary persons like us where the aim is to be in that phase only for 20 min. twice a day, the best is to close our eyes as the first step towards the process of meditation.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Spiritual Prescriptions: Prefer Meditation and Not Medication

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Meditation and not medication should be the first line of treatment for most lifestyle disorders. The very fact that our body has a receptor for each and every drug means it has the capacity to produce that drug. God did not make these receptors for pharmacological agents or drugs. The key lies in achieving the undisturbed state of consciousness, which can be obtained by either controlling the disturbed state of mind or bypassing it by using the mantra. The subject of spiritual medicine should be included in schools, colleges and medical sciences. Confession and communication are two easy modules of controlling the disturbed state of mind. As darkness is absence of light, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. To reduce negative thoughts, one should inculcate positive thoughts, actions and behaviors. One cannot hate a stranger. One can only hate a person whom he or she has loved. Hatred is therefore withdrawal of love, and it can only be removed by bringing the love back. It has been shown that diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, paralysis, asthma and acid-peptic disease can be kept under control with meditation without or with minimal medicines

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

What is the importance of silence?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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True silence is the silence between the thoughts and represents the true self, consciousness or the soul. It is a web of energized information ready to take all provided there is a right intent. Meditation is the process of achieving silence. Observing silence is another way of deriving benefits of meditation. Many yogis in the past have recommended and observed silence now and then. Mahatma Gandhi spent one day in silence every week. He believed that abstaining from speaking brought him inner peace and happiness. On all such days he communicated with others only by writing on paper.

Hindu principles also talk about a correlation between mauna (silence) and shanti (harmony). Mauna Ekadashi is a ritual followed traditionally in our country. On this day the person is not supposed to speak at all and observes complete silence all through the day and night. It gives immense peace to the mind and strength to the body. In Jainism, this ritual has a lot of importance. Nimith was a great saint in Jainism who long ago asked all Jains to observe this vrata. Some people recommend that on every ekadashi one should observe silence for few hours, if not the whole day.

In his book, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Deepak Chopra talks in great detail about the importance of observing silence in day to day life. He recommends that everyone should observe silence for 20 minutes every day. Silence helps to redirect our imagination towards self. Even Swami Sivananda in his teachings recommends observation of mauna daily for 2 hours. For ekadashi, take milk and fruits every day, study one chapter of Bhagwad Gita daily, do regular charity and donate one-tenth of your income in the welfare of the society. Ekadashi is the 11th day of Hindu lunar fortnight. It is the day of celebration, occurring twice a month, meant for meditation and increasing soul consciousness.

Vinoba Bhave was a great sage of our country known for his Bhoodaan movement. He was a great advocator and practical preacher of mauna vrata.

Mauna means silence and vrata means vow; hence, mauna vrata means a vow of silence. Mauna was practiced by saints to end enmity and recoup their enmity. Prolonged silence as the form of silence is observed by the rishi munis involved for prolonged periods of silence. Silence is a source of all that exists. Silence is where consciousness dwells. There is no religious tradition that does not talk about silence. It breaks the outward communication and forces a dialogue towards inner communication. This is one reason why all prayers, meditation and worship or any other practice whether we attune our mind to the spiritual consciousness within are done in silence.  After the death of a person it is a practice to observe silence for two minutes. The immediate benefit is that it saves a tremendous amount of energy.

Silence is cessation of both sensory and mental activity. It is like having a still mind and listening to the inner mind. Behind this screen of our internal dialogue is the silence of spirit. Meditation is the combination of observing silence and the art of observation.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Smile is a sign of joy, while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness. None of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart. They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness. It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing smile on your face. Hug comes next and laughter the last. Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits like that of doing meditation. But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
  2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  3. Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations and ideas.
  4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  1. Sit on a straight–backed chair or cross–legged on the floor.
  2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  3. Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and ideas.
  4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again

  (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  1. Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
  2. Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  3. Once youve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations and ideas.
  4. Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.

 (Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

Smile is a sign of joy, while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness. None of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart. They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness. It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing smile on your face. Hug comes next and laughter the last. Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits like that of doing meditation. But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Importance of silence

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Importance of silence

True silence is the silence between thoughts and represents the true self consciousness or the soul. It is a web of energized information ready to take all provided there is a right intent. Meditation is the process of achieving this silence. Observing silence is another way of getting benefits of meditation. Many yogis in the past have recommended and observed silence now and then. Mahatma Gandhi used to spend one day of each week in silence. He believed that abstaining from speech brought him inner peace and happiness. On these days he communicated with others only by writing on paper. Hindu principles also talks about a correlation between mauna silence and shanti harmony . Mauna Ekadashi is a ritual followed traditionally in our country. On this day the person is not supposed to speak at all and instead observe complete silence throughout day and night. It gives immense peace to the mind and strength to the body. In Jainism this ritual has a lot of importance. Nimith was a great saint in Jainism who long ago asked all Jains to observe this vrata. Some people recommend that on every ekadashi one should observe silence for few hours in a day if not the whole day. Deepak Chopra in his book The Seven Laws of Spiritual Success talks in great detail about the importance of observing silence in day to day life. He recommends that everyone should observe silence for 20 minutes every day. Silence helps to redirect our imagination towards self from the outer atmosphere. Even Swami Sivananda in his teachings recommends daily observation of mauna for 2 hours during ekadashi intake of milk and fruits every day study one chapter of Bhagwad Gita daily do regular charity and donate one tenth of the income in the welfare of the society. Ekadashi is the 11th day of Hindu lunar fortnight. Ekadashi is the day of celebration occurring twice a month meant for meditation and increasing soul consciousness. Vinoba Bhave was a great sage of our country who is known for this bhoodaan movement. He was a great advocator and practical preacher of mauna vrata. Mauna means silence and vrata means vow hence mauna vrata means vow of silence. Mauna was practiced by saints to end enmity and recoup their enmity. Prolonged silence as the form of silence is observed by the rishi munis involved for prolonged periods of silence. Silence is a source of all that exists. Silence is where conscious dwells. There is no religious tradition which does not talk about silence. It breaks outward communication and forces a dialogue towards inner communication. This is one reason why all prayers meditation and worship or any other practice whether we attune our mind to the spiritual consciousness within are done in silence. After the death of a person it is a practice to observe silence for two minutes. The immediate benefit is that it saves a tremendous amount of energy. Silence is cessation of both sensory and mental activity. It is like having a still mind and listening to the inner mind. Behind this screen of our internal dialogue is the silence of spirit. Meditation is the combination of observing silence and the art of observation. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Relieve stress by changing the interpretation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Stress is the reaction of the body or the mind to the interpretation of a known situation. Stress management therefore involves either changing the situation changing the interpretation or taming the body the yogic way in such a way that stress does not affect the body. Every situation has two sides. Changing the interpretation means looking at the other side of the situation. It is something like half glass of water which can be interpreted either as half empty or half full. Studies have shown that anger hostility and aggression are the new risk factors for heart disease. It has been shown that even recall of anger can precipitate a heart attack. Many studies have shown that when doctors talk positive in front of unconscious patients in ICU their outcome is better than those if doctors talk negative. The best way to practice spiritual medicine is to experience silence in the thoughts speech and action. Simply walking in the nature with silence in the mind and experiencing the sounds of nature can be as effective as 20 minutes of meditation. Twenty minutes of meditation provides the same physiological parameters as that of 7 hours of deep sleep. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on What is the difference between smile, hug and laugh?

Smile is a sign of joy while hug is a sign of love. Laughter on the other hand is a sign of inner happiness. None of them are at the level of mind or intellect. All come from within the heart. They are only the gradations of your expressions of your happiness. It is said you are incomplete in your dress if you are not wearing smile on your face. Hug comes next and laughter the last. Laughter is like an internal jogging and has benefits like that of doing meditation. But be careful we must know when not to laugh. The most difficult is to laugh on oneself Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Is it necessary to take a dip in Ganga to remove your sins?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Ganga Jamuna and Saraswati the trio sangam in Allahabad is believed to be the holiest place in the country where taking a dip can wash away all past sins. After death ashes are also submerged in Ganga water with an assumption that the past sins will be removed. In Vedic era what was the intention of the rishis and munis while making this ritual In mythology moon represents cool mind and Ganga represents the positive flow of thoughts. And sea turmoil indicates the disturbed state of mind. Hanuman ki samudra yatra indicates the meditative journey through the flow of thoughts. Samudra manthan represents the journey of the mind during meditation. Taking a dip can be equated to shifting your mind towards your consciousness which can happen when you introspect in a relaxed state of mind or when you practice meditation. Meditation is defined as a journey from sympathetic and parasympathetic state of mind or a journey from disturbed state of consciousness to undisturbed state of consciousness. Every time you meditate you dip into your consciousness and clean your guilt and negative thoughts. It is something like reformatting your hard disk and removing the bad sectors and viruses in your software. It is therefore possible for you to do Ganga snan bath at your house in the morning while meditating or during pooja by drifting away from disturbed state of mind to non disturbed relaxed state of mind clearing your guilt and negative thoughts. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

The Main Principle of Knowing the Truth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The main figure in the Upanishads is sage Yajnavalkya known as one of the greatest philosophers. Most of the great teachings of later Hindu or Buddhist philosophy are derived from him. He taught the great doctrine of neti neti the view that truth can be found only through the negation of all thoughts about it. Brhadaranyaka Upanishad is the oldest and the most important of all the Upanishads. Its name actually means the great forest book. Sage Yajnavalkya s dialogues with his wife Maitreyi are featured in the Muni Kanda or Yajnavalkya Kanda. The doctrine of neti neti suggests the indescribability of the Brahman the Absolute. Yajnavalkaya attempts to define Brahman. Atman is described neither this nor this neti neti. The Self cannot be described in any way. Na iti that is Neti. Through this process of neti neti you give up everything the cosmos the body the mind and everything to realize the Self. Once the Atman is defined in this manner are you become familiar with it a transformation takes place as realization dawns that the phenomenal world and all its creatures are made up of the same essence of bliss. Brahman is infinite amorphous colorless characterless and formless Universal Spirit which is omnipresent and omnipotent and like cosmic energy is pervasive unseen and indescribable. Neti neti Meditation The principle of neti neti has been used in meditation involving gnana yoga. Whenever a thought or feeling comes to mind that is not the goal of the meditation or is not the soul or the inner self the meditator simply has to say Not this not this and dismiss the thought image concept sound or sense distraction. Any thought any feeling is patiently discarded again and again if necessary until the mind is clear and the soul or the self is revealed. Neti neti and the mind When you get into the habit of neti neti you can also discard thoughts of worry doubt or fear and become established in the light of your inner self. You can then look back at worries and fears with deep insight and handle them. Neti neti and the medical profession One of the basic medical teachings is to diagnose a condition by way of excluding other similar conditions. This is called differential diagnosis and this is the mainstay of allopathy. This also makes one investigative oriented but is the only scientific way of knowing the truth. Neti neti and multiple choice questions In any modern exam today the principle of neti neti is used. A question has about four nearly similar answers and the student has to answer the correct one. He can only answer by the principle of negation. Neti neti and police investigations This principle is also used while handling a criminal case. Everyone is a suspect in the crime initially till a process of elimination clears them. Disclaimer The views expressed in this write up are my own .

Mindfulness meditation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Mindfulness meditation

  • Sit on a straight-backed chair or cross-legged on the floor.
  • Focus on an aspect of your breathing, such as the sensation of air flowing into your nostrils and out of your mouth, or your belly rising and falling as you inhale and exhale.
  • Once you’ve narrowed your concentration in this way, begin to widen your focus. Become aware of sounds, sensations, and ideas.
  • Embrace and consider each thought or sensation without judging it good or bad. If your mind starts to race, return your focus to your breathing. Then expand your awareness again.
(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).