Women are not diagnosed or treated as aggressively as men. Even though more women than men die of heart disease each year, women receive 33% of all angioplasties, stents and bypass surgeries; 28% of implantable defibrillators; and 36 percent of open-heart surgeries, according to the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease.

Although the traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease — such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity — have a detrimental impact in men and women, certain factors play a bigger role in the development of heart disease in women. Read more