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Dr K K Aggarwal

Negative stress may lead to heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Negative stress may lead to heart disease

Marital disharmony and job dissatisfaction are the two main mental risk factors for the causation of heart attack. Many studies in the past have suggested that there is a strong correlation between a nagging wife and early heart attacks in men. Similarly, literature has shown that work–related stress is related to early onset of high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke and heart attacks. A study from University College, London has shown that chronically stressed workers have a 68% of higher risk of developing heart disease, especially in people under the age of 50. Whether stress–related chemical changes or stress–related behavior is linked to heart disease, is yet to be answered. Stress–related lifestyle involves eating unhealthy food, smoking, drinking and skipping exercises. Chemical changes related to chronic stress are increased levels of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Amongst stress, negative stress is more dangerous than positive stress and amongst negative stress it is jealousy, anger and cynicism which are associated with heart attack. The answer lies in managing stress by acting on a personal situation and not reacting to it. In children the same type of stress, especially during exam days, can end up with anxiety, insomnia and suicidal attempts

Negative stress may lead to heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Negative stress may lead to heart disease

Marital disharmony and job dissatisfaction are the two main mental risk factors for the causation of heart attack. Many studies in the past have linked that there is a strong correlation between a nagging wife and early heart attacks in men. Similarly, literature has shown that work related stress is related to early onset of high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke and heart attacks. A study from University College, London has shown that chronically stressed workers have a 68% of higher risk of developing heart disease especially in people under the age of 50. Whether it is stress-related chemical changes or stress-related behavior linked to heart disease, is yet to be answered.

Stress-related lifestyle involves eating unhealthy food, smoking, drinking and skipping exercises. Chemical changes related to chronic stress are increased levels of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Amongst stress, negative stress is more dangerous than positive stress and amongst negative stress it is jealousy, anger and cynicism which are associated with heart attack. The answer lies in managing stress by acting on a personal situation and not reacting to it. In children the same type of stress, especially during exam days, can end up with anxiety, insomnia and suicidal attempts.