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Dr K K Aggarwal

A diet that is healthy for a person may be junk food for another

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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We have all wondered why some people do not seem to gain weight, while others do. A study has found that even if we all ate the same meal, we would all burn it differently and have different blood sugar levels later. These findings draw attention to personalized nutrition. High blood sugar levels are associated with several diseases including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and strokes. Blood sugar levels of 800 individuals of varying weights continuously were monitored with a glucose monitor for over a week as they ate nearly 47,000 meals. Some had prediabetes. The study subjects used a smartphone app to log when they slept, exercised, and ate. Stool samples were also taken to analyze gut microbiome. The study revealed a vast variability in the responses to even identical meals. Some people who ate bread did not show any variation in blood sugar levels, while others had high blood sugar with the same meal. Eran Segal, PhD, another researcher who worked on the study noted that one prediabetic obese woman had a blood sugar spike when she ate a tomato, which is a healthy food. The researchers next examined if personalizing the diet improved blood sugar levels for 26 people. The personalized diets reduced the blood sugar levels after meals and altered their gut bacteria. (Medscape)

Heart disease starts in youth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese. The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart disease than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat. Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increase in the boys and drop in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls. Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. Insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rises until the age of 19 years. Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Diabetes mainly linked to obesity

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Type 2 diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with obesity.

More than 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to obesity.

1. There is a curvilinear relationship between BMI and the risk of type 2 diabetes.

2. Lowest risk is associated with a BMI below 22 kg/m2

3. At a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2, the relative risk for diabetes adjusted for age increases to 61. The risk may further increase by a sedentary lifestyle or decrease by exercise.

4. Weight gain after age 18 years in women and after age 20 years in men increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.

5. The Nurses’ Health Study compared women with stable weight (those who gained or lost <5 kg) after the age of 18 years to women who gained weight. Those who had gained 5.0 to 7.9 kg had a relative risk of diabetes of 1.9; this risk increased to 2.7 for women who gained 8.0 to 10.9 kg.

6. Similar findings were noted in men in the Health Professionals Study. The excess risk for diabetes with even modest weight gain is substantial.

7. Weight gain precedes the onset of diabetes. Among Pima Indians (a group with a particularly high incidence of type 2 diabetes), body weight gradually increased 30 kg (from 60 kg to 90 kg) in the years preceding the diagnosis of diabetes. Conversely, weight loss is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

8. Insulin resistance with high insulin levels is characteristic of obesity and is present before the onset of high blood sugar levels.

9. Obesity leads to impairment in glucose removal and increased insulin resistance, which result in hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia contributes to high lipid levels and high blood pressure.

 

Cycling can cause erectile dysfunction

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Age, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, high lipids, smoking, drugs, heart disease, upright cycling for more than 3 hours a week can cause erectile dysfunction in males. Those who ride bicycles for more than 3 hours a week should do so in a reclining position and not upright position.

A man is considered to have erectile dysfunction when he cannot acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity for sexual intercourse. Any man may, at one time or another during his life, experience periodic or isolated sexual failures.

The term “impotent” is reserved for those men who experience erectile failure during attempted intercourse more than 75 percent of the time. Heart disease increases the risk for later erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction may be an early warning sign of future heart disease. Men with erectile dysfunction without an obvious cause (e.g., pelvic trauma), and who have no symptoms of heart disease, should be screened for heart disease prior to treatment since there are potential cardiac risks associated with sexual activity in patients with heart disease.
Eight of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications list impotence as a side effect and it is estimated that 25 percent of cases of erectile dysfunction are due to drugs.
Depression, stress, or the drugs used to treat depression can result in erectile dysfunction.
Neurologic causes of erectile dysfunction include stroke, spinal cord or back injury, multiple sclerosis, or dementia. In addition, pelvic trauma, prostate. Surgery or priapism may cause erectile dysfunction.
Bicycling: Less obvious, but of increasing importance, has been the possible association of erectile dysfunction with bicycling. Anything that places prolonged pressure on the pudendal and cavernosal nerves or compromises blood flow to the penile artery can result in penile numbness and impotence.
Cycling-induced impotence is primarily a problem of serious cyclists and has been reported to occur in Norwegian men competing in a 540 km bicycle race.
The penile numbness is attributed to the pressure on the perineal nerves whereas the erectile dysfunction is thought to be due to a decrease in oxygen pressure in the pudendal arteries.
Recreational cyclists, those who cycle for less than 3 hours per week and men who cycle in a reclining position avoid the sustained intense pressure on the penile nerve and artery and are less likely to experience sexual side effects. Continued cycling in a seated upright position can reduce the penile oxygen levels lasting ten minutes.

Obesity reduces life expectancy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Obesity in adulthood is associated with a striking reduction in life expectancy for both men and women. Among 3457 subjects in the Framingham Study, done in the United States, those who were obese (Body Mass Index or BMI =30 kg/m2) at age 40 years lived 6 to 7 years less than those who were not (BMI =24.9 kg/m2).

Those who were overweight (BMI 25 to 29.9 km/m2) at age 40 years lived about three years less, and those who were both obese and smoked lived 13 to 14 years less than normal–weight nonsmokers.

The steady rise in life expectancy during the past two centuries may come to an end because of the increasing prevalence of obesity.

Being overweight during adolescence also increase the risk of premature death as an adult. The analysis of Nurses’ Health Study has shown the risk of premature death increases with higher BMIs at age 18 years. For a BMI at age 18 of 18.5 to 21.9, 22 to 24.9, 25 to 29.9, and =30 kg/m2, the hazard ratio for premature death were 0.98, 1.18, 1.66, and 2.79, respectively.

A prospective study from the United States, at National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, valuated the relationship between BMI and risk of death over a maximum follow–up period of 10 years among over 500,000 men and women aged 50 to 71 years.

Among the subset of individuals 50 years of age (when prevalence of chronic disease is low) who had never smoked, an increased risk of death was associated with being either overweight (20 to 50 percent increase in those between 26.5 to 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (two–to over threefold increase in those =30 kg/m2).

Overweight and obesity, when analyzed together, is associated with increased mortality from diabetes and kidney disease.

Obesity, when analyzed alone, is associated with increased cardiac mortality and cancers considered to be obesity–related (colon, breast, esophageal, uterine, ovarian, kidney, and pancreatic cancer), but not with mortality from other cancers or non–cardiac mortality.

There are some recent studies which showed that obese people live longer. Overweight was shown to be associated with reduced mortality from non cancer, non–cardiovascular causes, but not with cancer or cardiovascular mortality. In them being underweight was associated with increased mortality from non cancer and non–cardiac causes, but not cancer and cardiac causes.

Obesity and increased central fat are associated with increased morbidity in addition to mortality. Overweight and obese individuals have a higher relative risk of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus compared with normal weight individuals. The risk of hypertension and diabetes increases with increasing BMI.

In the Nurses’ Health and the Health Professionals studies, the risk of developing a chronic disease (gallstones, hypertension, heart disease, colon cancer and stroke (in men only)) increased with increasing BMI, even in those in the upper half of the healthy weight range (BMI 22.0 to 24.9 kg/m2).

Obesity is measured by using a measurement called BMI, which is calculated by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of their height in metres.

A BMI of 18.5 to 23 is considered normal (Asians). One below 18.5 is considered underweight and 25 or above is considered obese.

Heart disease starts in youth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.

The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart disease than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat.

Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increases in the boys and drops in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls.

Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. Insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rises until the age of 19 years.

Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Heart disease starts in youth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Heart disease starts in youth

Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing

The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.

The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart disease than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat.

Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increases in the boys and drops in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls.

Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. Insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rises until the age of 19 years.

Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Heart disease starts in youth

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Autopsy studies of young people who died in accidents have shown that by the late teens, the heart blockages, the kind of lesions cause heart attacks and strokes are in the process of developing.

Quoting a study published in the journal Circulation, Dr Aggarwal said that it is never too early to start protective measures against heart disease.

The best opportunity to prevent heart disease is to look at children and adolescents and start the preventive process early. More than a third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.

The first signs that men are at higher risk of heart diseases than women appear during the adolescent years despite the fact that boys lose fat and gain muscle in adolescence, while girls add body fat.

Between the ages of 11 and 19, levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat associated with cardiovascular disease, increases in the boys and drops in the girls. Levels of HDL cholesterol, the “good” kind that helps keep arteries clear, go down in boys but rise in girls.

Blood pressure increases in both, but significantly more in boys. And insulin resistance, a marker of cardiovascular risk, which is lower in boys at age 11, rise until the 19.

Any protection that the young women have for cardiovascular protection can be wiped out by obesity and hence obesity in girls at any cost should be handled on priority.

Inaugurating the Mela, Dr. Ashok Walia, Hon’ble Minister of Health and Family Welfare, Government of Delhi said that to reduce the menace of increasing lifestyle disorders in the society, we must say no to junk food and avoid eating a combination of white sugar, white rice and white maida. He said that one should not use trans-fat in the diet as it can lead to abdominal obesity.

Dr. Walia emphasized regarding heart diseases in the city and said

1.   About 50 people die of heart disease every day in Delhi itself. Delhi Government has planned to reduce this in the city.

3.   It has already banned Gutka.

4.   It has started diabetic and hypertension control programmes,

5.   It is working against the supply of junk food in schools and is educating about the concept of exercise in schools.

6.   The Government also has a school health scheme for the examination of school children.

7.   For kidney patients, it has a free dialysis programme.

8.    For BPL heart patients, Delhi Government provides free angioplasty and bypass surgery and the Government is enforcing free beds for heart patients in private hospitals, which have received free or concessional land from the Government.

Dr. T. Meniya, Member of Parliament said that emphasis on the role of exercise in day to day life should be given. He said that even simple walking can make all the difference.

In her message to the Mela, Smt. Sheila Dixit, Hon’ble Chief Minister of Delhi, said that for combating lifestyle disorders, the public health education is the only answer.

Smt. Savita Gupta, Hon’ble Mayor, South MCD in her message said that meditation and prayer are part and parcel of healthy lifestyle.

Acharya Dr. Sadhvi Sadhna Ji Maharaj, Chairperson World Fellowship of Religions emphasized on the role of Mantra meditation.

Delivering the presidential address, Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India, said that the Government should think of limiting the quantity of trans fats in the hotel industry. He also said that education should be created amongst school children about the hazards of eating trans fats. Talking about dengue menace, Dr. Aggarwal said that all school children should be given home work to check for dengue breeding in their respective houses and neighbourhood.

Other eminent personalities who gave their messages were – Shri AK Garg, CMD MTNL, Shri Suman Mukherjee, Director, SAIL, Shri AP Frank Noronha, DG DAVP, Shri SS Gupta, Dev. Commissioner Handicrafts, Govt.. of India, Padma Shri Awardee Alok Mehta Editor National Dunya, Sh Rajiv Ranjan Srivastava Editor  Deshbandhu, Sh Anil Ganeriwala Joint  Secretary, AYUSH, Govt. of India, Shri Satish Kumar, ED, Indian Oil, Shri R. Chandra Mohan, Pr. Secretary-cum-Commissioner, Transport Department, Shri Sanjiv Kumar, Secretary, Dept of Environment, Shri AP Singh, Zonal Manager(North), LIC, Shri GG Saxena, CMD DTDC, Shri BP Singh, Advisor & Head, RVPSP, DST, Shri Rajiv Kale, Director WCD, Dr. M Sudhakar, Scientist G, Ministry of Earth Science, Shri Sanjay Kumar, Secretary (Environment & Forest), Shri Deepak Jolly, Vice President Coca Cola Ltd., Shri R.C. Daka, Director AIIMS, Shri Vivek Kumar, Trustee, Brij Rma Foundation, Shri KS Rao, Jt. Secy., MOHFW, GoI, Dr. A K Aggarwal, President, DMC, Sh Satish Goell Chairman Mujaffar Nagar Medical College, Dr Harish Gupta, President, DMA, Shri Sandeep Marwah, Chairman, AAFT, Shri Rajender Gupta, Former Transport  Minister Delhi, Shri Satish Upadhayay, Chairman Education Committee, MCD South Zone and Dr V K Khanna President IAHP.

Celebrities who were present were Padma Bhushan Awardee Uma Sharma, Kathak Dancers Nalini Kamalkini, Sangeeta Bahl and Ramon Lamba.

Over 50 activities have been planned in the Perfect Health Mela and will include inter-school; inter-nursing school, inter-dancing school and inter-college festivals, workshops on physics and consciousness, cardiology workshops for naturopaths, Ayurved physicians and homeopaths, all pathy and all religion meet on exercise and prayer. The 5 days of Mela will be a mix of exhibition, checkups and infotainment.

Workshop on obesity

A special workshop was organized on obesity and concluded that trans-fat should be banned in the hotel industry. The participants included Dr. KK Aggarwal and Dr Praveen Bhatia obesity surgeon.

1.   Abdominal obesity is more dangerous than generalized obesity

2.    One should avoid a combination of refined carbs and animal fat

3.   Eat in moderation

4.   Exercise more

5.   Longer the waist line shorter the life line

1000 children walk for good health

1000 children walked from Shastri Bhavan to the Mela ground in the morning with health play cards

1.   Foods of plant in origin have no cholesterol

2.   Dengue mosquito grows in fresh collected home water

3.   Breathing with a speed of 5 per minute for twenty minute can be a used like a drug

4.   Eat seasonal fruits and vegetables

5.   Move and walk is the fitness mantra

1500 school children participate in Harmony

Over 1500 school children participated in the special festival Harmony in competitions like Poster-cum-Slogan Writing, Health Model Display-cum-Demonstration on prevention of vector born diseases, Quiz on non-communicable diseases and Folk Dance on dance to good health. The prizes were distributed on the spot. Birla Vidya Niketan school was the coordinating school.

Mrs Minakshi Kushwaha and Mrs Tapati Singhi from BVN said that school children can paly a major role in checking the menace of dengue in the city.

1.   Dance is good for the heart

2.   Walk atleast 80 minutes a day

3.   Brisk walk atleast 80 minutes a week

4.   Brisk walk should be more than 80 steps a minute

5.   Do not use lift for the first floor

 National workshop on Ayurveda in cardiology

Over 200 Ayurvedic doctors participated in a workshop organized in association with Integrated Medical Association on all about cardiac diagnostics an Ayurveda doctor should know. The faculty included Dr. KK Aggarwal and Dr. Vinayak Aggarwal and Dr R P Parasher.

Facts

1.   Arjuna Chaal is good for heart patients

2.   One clove of garlic is good for the heart

3.   Heart patients should avoid eating food rich in pungent, sour and salt taste.

Over 400 school teachers attend a workshop on Health and Hygiene

Over 400 school teachers attended a workshop on health and hygiene. The workshops were conducted for school teachers by Birla Vidya Niketan and Ryan International School. Over 400 teachers including from SMCD were trained. The workshops were conducted by Dr. KK Aggarwal and Anju Uppal Principal Rynes International School Faridabad.

Facts

1.   One should not cough in hands or in handkerchief

2.   One should wash hands before eating

3.   Washing hands should be for 15 seconds.

PFA stalls attack crowd

Large number of people could be seen at the food adulteration stalls showing how to detect adulteration in food.

Cultural Shows at Perfect Health Mela

Cultural shows were organized by Punjabi Academy and National Song and Drama Division.

Diet Is Linked To the Diabetes Epidemic

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A study in the medical journal Diabetes Care highlights the importance of the whole diet rather than focusing on certain foods or food groups that might be beneficial.

A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables (leafy green), nuts, and low–fat dairy may help people lower their risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% over 5 years than those who ate the lowest amounts of these foods.

Also, a diet which contains high amounts of red meat, high–fat dairy and refined grains like white bread may boost the odds of diabetes development by 18%.

In contrast, adults whose diets were high in red meat, high–fat dairy, refined grains like white bread, plus beans and tomatoes, saw their diabetes risk go up by 18 percent as a group.

Type 2 diabetes is closely linked to obesity and it’s well–known that maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise reduces the risk of developing the disease. Diet affects diabetes risk independent of a person’s weight.



“More than 30% people of the society including children have potbelly abdominal obesity”
Padma Shri & Dr. B.C. Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India  moderated a session on Obesity at India Habitat Centre.The session was organized by Heart Care Foundation of India in  association with All India Radio and India Habitat Centre. The session was organized to mark the occasion of Doctor’s Day falling on 1st July. The panelists included Dr Shikha Sharma Wellness Expert, Dr S V Tripathy Ayurveda Expert, Dr Mridula Pandey Homeopath, Dr Praveen Bhatia,Obesity Surgeon and Dr Ishwar Basavvadadde Senior Yoga
Physician.

This was an interaction organized for the first time that involved people from all pathies under one roof. Following points were raised in the seminar:
1.      Potbelly obesity is linked to eating refined carbohydrates and not animal fats.
2.      General obesity is linked to eating animal fats.
3.      Refined carbohydrate includes white rice, white maida and white sugar.
4.      Brown sugar is better than white sugar.
5.      Refined carbohydrates are called bad carbohydrates and animal fat is called bad fat.
6.    Trans fats or vanaspati are bad for health. They increase bad cholesterol and reduce good cholesterol.
7.      Reduction in weight can reduce snoring, pain of arthritis, blood
pressure and control uncontrolled diabetes.
8.      One should not gain weight of more than 5 kg after the age of 20 years.
9.      After the age of 50, the weight should reduce and not increase.
10.     Surgery is the answer when all other means fail.