Sub Logo

Dr K K Aggarwal

Routine ECG Does Not Help

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Routine ECG Does Not Help

In populations of older adults, prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events through traditional risk factors is less accurate than in middle–aged adults. It has been shown that electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in older adults and might be of value for CHD prediction. However, performing routine ECG among asymptomatic adults is not supported by current evidence and is not recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association. The aim of the study by Auer and colleagues was to determine whether baseline ECG abnormalities or development of new and persistent ECG abnormalities are associated with increased CHD events.

Routine ECG Does Not Help

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Routine ECG Does Not Help

In populations of older adults, prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events through traditional risk factors is less accurate than in middle–aged adults. It has been shown that electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in older adults and might be of value for CHD prediction. However, performing routine ECG among asymptomatic adults is not supported by current evidence and is not recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association.

The aim of this study by Auer and colleagues was to determine whether baseline ECG abnormalities or development of new and persistent ECG abnormalities are associated with increased CHD events.

Routine ECG Does Not Help

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Routine ECG Does Not Help

In populations of older adults, prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events through traditional risk factors is less accurate than in middle-aged adults. It has been shown that electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in older adults and might be of value for CHD prediction. However, performing routine ECG among asymptomatic adults is not supported by current evidence and is not recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association.

The aim of this study by Auer and colleagues was to determine whether baseline ECG abnormalities or development of new and persistent ECG abnormalities are associated with increased CHD events.