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Dr K K Aggarwal

5 foods that fight high cholesterol

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Oats give you soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries to get more soluble fibers.
  • Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal.
  • Nuts: Eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL by about 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.
  • Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.
  • Fatty fish. Eating fish 2 to 3 times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL–boosting saturated fats and by delivering LDL–lowering omega–3 fats.

High fat diet, prostate cancer prone

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Diets high in saturated fats increase the risk of prostate cancer. As per a report from University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston published in the International Journal of Cancer, men who consume high saturated animal fat diet are two times more likely to experience disease progression after prostate cancer surgery than men with lower saturated fat intake. The “disease–free” survival time was also shorter among obese men who eat high saturated fat diet than non–obese men consuming diets low in saturated fat. Non–obese men with high intake and obese men with low intake had “disease–free” survival of 29 and 42 months, respectively. Men with a high saturated fat intake had the shortest survival time free of prostate cancer (19 months). Non–obese men with low fat intake survived the longest time free of the disease (46 months).

Take home messages

• High saturated fat diet has been linked to cancer of the prostate

• Reducing saturated fat in the diet after prostate cancer surgery can help reduce the cancer progression.

• Cancer prostate has the same risk factors as that of heart blockages and both are linked to high saturated fat intake.

• With an increase in number of heart patients, a corresponding increase in prostate cancer patients is also seen in the society.

Carbohydrates as substitute to saturated fats not the answer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Many prospective studies have addressed components of diet and the risk of heart disease.

The type of fat consumed appears to be more important than the amount of total fat.

Trans fatty acids increase risk of heart disease while polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats decrease the risk.

There is controversy about whether it is optimal to substitute saturated fats with carbohydrate. An increase in carbohydrate tends to reduce the level of good high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in addition to total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Thus, the reduction in heart disease risk may be less than predicted by the reduction of saturated fat alone.

Observational studies have consistently shown that individuals consuming diets high in vegetables and fruits (which are rich in antioxidant vitamins) had a reduced risk of heart disease.

Results of a number of randomized trials are now available and show largely no significant clinical benefits of antioxidant vitamins on heart disease.

Supplemental vitamin C, E, and beta carotene cannot be recommended in the primary prevention of CHD.

Taking supplements without clinical benefits could, in theory, increase the risk if individuals mistakenly avoid therapeutic lifestyle changes or drug therapies with proven benefits.

Carbohydrates as substitute to saturated fats not the answer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Carbohydrates as substitute to saturated fats not the answer

More than 20 prospective studies have addressed components of diet and the risk of heart disease.

The type of fat consumed appears to be more important than the amount of total fat.

Trans fatty acids increase risk of heart disease while polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats decrease risk.

There is a controversy about whether it is optimal to substitute saturated fats with carbohydrates. An increase in carbohydrate tends to reduce the level of good high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in addition to total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Thus, the reduction in heart disease risk may be less than predicted by the reduction of saturated fat alone.

Observational studies have consistently shown that individuals consuming diets high in vegetables and fruits, which are rich in antioxidant vitamins, had a reduced risk of heart disease.

Results of a number of randomized trials are now available and show largely no significant clinical benefits of antioxidant vitamins on heart disease.

Supplemental vitamin C, E, and beta carotene cannot be recommended in the primary prevention of CHD.

Taking supplements without clinical benefits could, in theory, increase the risk if individuals mistakenly avoid therapeutic lifestyle changes or drug therapies with proven benefits.

Carbohydrates as substitute to saturated fats not the answer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Carbohydrates as substitute to saturated fats not the answer

More than 20 prospective studies have addressed components of diet and the risk of heart disease.

The type of fat consumed appears to be more important than the amount of total fat.

Trans fatty acids increase risk of heart disease while polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats decrease risk.

There is controversy about whether it is optimal to substitute saturated fats with carbohydrate. An increase in carbohydrate tends to reduce the level of good high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in addition to total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Thus, the reduction in heart disease risk may be less than predicted by the reduction of saturated fat alone.

Observational studies have consistently shown that individuals consuming diets high in vegetables and fruits (which are rich in antioxidant vitamins) had a reduced risk of heart disease.

Results of a number of randomized trials are now available and show largely no significant clinical benefits of antioxidant vitamins on heart disease.

Supplemental vitamin C, E, and beta carotene cannot be recommended in the primary prevention of CHD.

Taking supplements without clinical benefits could, in theory, increase the risk if individuals mistakenly avoid therapeutic lifestyle changes or drug therapies with proven benefits.