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Dr K K Aggarwal

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
  2. I wish I had worked harder.
  3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
  5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The Science of Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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All of us are taught about hygienic living and this subject should be included as a chapter in the curriculum of every school. There are many different kinds of hygiene.

Respiratory hygiene: To prevent cross infection, specifically, from flu and related respiratory illness. One should be at a distance of minimum 3 ft, from a person who is coughing, sneezing or singing. Most respiratory particles are more than 5 microns in size and do not travel a distance of more than 3 ft. This may be one reason why in the ancient times, sneezing was considered a bad omen and people were asked to stay away for few seconds from someone who sneezes in front of them. This respiratory hygiene, however, will not prevent transmission of tuberculosis whose bacteria are less than 5 microns which keeps circulating in the area.

Hand hygiene: This is the fundamental principle for any disease prevention and the catch phrase is “before and after”, which means – one should wash hands before and after eating food, touching any infected material, seeing a patient or after normal evacuation of stool in the morning.

Food hygiene: This basically means maintaining hygiene at home while cutting, serving and eating food. While cutting a vegetable, it involves clean hygienic surface, knife, hands, water, utensils etc. If that hygiene is not possible, follow the formula of boil it, heat it, peel it, cook it or forget it. That means, any food which has been boiled, heated or peeled is safe for eating. Peeling means removing the skin of a fruit such as banana or oranges.

Water hygiene: involves drinking safe water, safe drinking glass, proper washing of glass, not washing multiple glasses in the same utensil and proper picking of glasses. It is often seen that many caretakers pick up four glasses of water at a time with four fingers one in each glass.

Sexual hygiene: This involves washing local areas before and after sexual contact.

Body hygiene: This involves 16 upchars, as mentioned in mythology. Out of these 16 basic steps, some are related to body hygiene and they involve washing feet first and then hands followed by mouth and finally the body. Washing of the feet is the most important as they are the ones which carry infections into one’s house.

Cleaning of mouth is cleaning the teeth with one finger, gums with two fingers, tongue with three fingers and palate with thumb.

Abhishekam or the snana of the body involves multiple steps. Ancient steps have been washing the body with milk water (rose water etc.) followed by rubbing with curd (soap), honey (moisturizers), ghee (oil), sugar (the drying agent) and finally with milk water again. This facilitates natural bathing and not dependent on soap.

Nail hygiene: This is also one of the most important hygiene because they are responsible for causation of water and food disease. Therefore, this hygiene is very important for food handlers. It is important that they be give typhoid vaccines and de–worming tablets every three months

Servant hygiene: The most important hygiene to be observed at our homes is that of the servants or the help. They are often provided soap at the start of the month and they are supposed to continue using that soap for a month. If by any chance, they lose that soap in 2–3 weeks’ time, they are apprehensive in asking the owners for soap. As a result, they may wash their hands without soap for the next 2–3 weeks, which includes washing of hands in morning.

Science behind Training and Development

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Training in any field requires gaining knowledge, skills and positive mental attitude towards the object of learning. Knowledge is everything about what and why. In Yoga, it correlates with the Gyan (Gnana) Marg. The skill is all about how to do it and correlates with Karma Marg. A positive mental attitude is linked to willingness to do any work or in other words, one’s Aastha in that action. In Yoga, it is synonymous with Bhakti Marga.

In Bhagawad Gita, Lord Krishna talks about all the principles of management including how to train and develop an individual. The development teaches and increases one’s intelligence quotient (IQ), physical quotient (PQ), emotional quotient (EQ) and moral quotient (MQ).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Science behind Training and Development

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Science behind Training and Development

Training in any field requires gaining knowledge, skills and positive mental attitude towards the object of learning. Knowledge is everything about what and why. In Yoga, it correlates with the Gyan (Gnana) Marg. The skill is all about how to do it and correlates with Karma Marg. A positive mental attitude is linked to willingness to do any work or in other words one’s Astha in that action. In Yoga, it is synonymous with Bhakti Marg.

In Bhagwad Gita, Lord Krishna talks about all the principles of management including how to train and develop an individual. The development teaches and increases one’s intelligence quotient (IQ), physical quotient (PQ), emotional quotient (EQ) and moral quotient (MQ).

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
  2. I wish I had worked harder.
  3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
  5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Science behind regrets

In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. 1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
    2. I wish I had worked harder.
    3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
    4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
    5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need–based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered –passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.

The Science of Power

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Power is the ability to influence others to get a work done the way you want it.

We have seen evolution in the way power works. There was a time when Brahmins ruled using the power of knowledge; then came the era of Kshatriyas, who ruled using the physical power. This was followed by the era of Vaishyas ruling the world with the power of money and a time will come when Shudras will rule with the power of their work.

In one of his lectures, Deepak Jain from Kellogg’s said that the world has seen eras of physical power, economical power and the time has come that it will now be ruled by the power of human resources.

Former Governor of Mizoram A R Kohli, in one of his talks, said that there are four types of powers which govern the universe and these are – physical power, economical power, the power of the chair (ego) and the power of the human resource, which is based on consciousness.

Everyone has these four inherent powers. The physical power is based on fear, tamas and rajas. The economical and the power of chair are linked to one’s ego and rajas. It is the power of human resource which is linked to the soul, consciousness and Satva.

The physical power is at the level of body, economic power is at the level of mind, the power of chair is at the level of intellect and ego and the power of human resources is at the level of soul. It is the power of human resource which is based on Dharma and is universally accepted by all religions.

As per Mahabharata, the powers are the power of human resource (righteousness or Yudhishthir), power to remained focused (Arjun), power to fight injustice (Bheem), power to help others (Sahdev) and power to remain neutral during any adversity (Nakul).

In Vedic sciences, these powers are also defined as Ichhashakti (the power of desires to be with the consciousness), Kriyashakti (the power to do selfless work), Gyanshakti (the power to learn about consciousness), Chitta shakti (the power to take conscious based decisions) and Anand shakti (the power for inner happiness).

The power of human resources talks about cultivating relationships. It is not based on the principles of survival of the fittest, which is an animal behavior. The power of human resource believes in training and developing everyone to survive and become the fittest of the fit.

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
  2. I wish I had worked harder.
  3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
  5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non–fulfillment of desires and needs. These need-based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

  1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
  2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

  1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
  3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish I had married off my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

  1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
  2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

  1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
  2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
  3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
  4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
  5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
  6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life.

This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or even 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first or else we would be in a state of constant worry till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one confession is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.

Science behind Holasthak

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Holashtak refers to the eight days prior to Holi festival and is considered inauspicious in mythology.

In North India, Holashtak begins on the Phalgun Shukla Ashtami (eighth day during the waxing phase of moon in Falgun month) and ends on the Phalgun Purnima day (full moon day). The Purnima day is observed as Holika Dahan.

It is considered inauspicious to perform auspicious ceremonies during the period like marriage, housewarming or any of the sanskars. People also avoid starting a new business etc. The day is considered ideal for performing Daan – alms giving.

The difference between Holi and Diwali is that Holi is observed in Uttarayana (the period with positive state of mind) and Diwali in Dakshinayana (the period with negative state of mind).

In Holi, we try making up with our enemies and in Diwali we only redefine our existing friendship.

Holi means burning negativity in our mind and in the mind of our enemies. This can only happen in a period of positive state of mind (first six months of the year). The process of removing negativity requires multiple attempts. As per mythology it requires eight days (or eight attempts) to remove the negative attitude of a person and hence the word Holasthak.

During the period one is trying to wash out the negativity, it is best to avoid calling people for community functions as in that case you will need to call the one with whom you are trying to patch up and the same may not be in sound frame of mind with you and you may end up with an uncomfortable situation.

The Science Of Hygiene

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Everybody is taught to learn about hygienic living and this should be a chapter in every school. There are many types of hygiene.

Respiratory hygiene to prevent cross infection, specifically, from flu and related respiratory illness. One should distance oneself from a person who is coughing, sneezing or singing by minimum 3ft. Most respiratory particles are more than 5 microns in weight and do not travel a distance of more than 3 ft. This may be one reason why in ancient era, sneezing was considered a bad omen and people were asked to stay away for few seconds from someone who sneezes in front of them. This respiratory hygiene, however, will not prevent transmission of tuberculosis whose bacteria are less than 5 microns which keeps circulating in the area.

Hand hygiene: is a fundamental principle for any disease prevention and the catch point is – “before and after”, which means – one should wash hands before and after eating food, touching any infected material, seeing a patient or after normal evacuation of stool in the morning.

Food hygiene: basically means maintaining hygiene at home while cutting, serving and eating food. While cutting a vegetable, it involves clean hygienic surface, knife, hands, water, utensils etc. If that hygiene is not possible, follow the formula of boil it, heat it, peal it, cook it or forget it. That means, any food which is boiled ,heated, peeled or heated is safe for eating. Peeling means like pealing a banana and oranges or anything which can be peeled by hands.

Water hygiene: involves drinking safe water, safe drinking glass, proper washing of glass, not washing multiple glasses in the same utensil and proper picking of glasses. It is often seen that many caretakers pick up four glasses of water at a time with four fingers one in each glass.

Sexual hygiene: involves washing local areas before and after sexual contact.

Body hygiene: involves 16 upchars, as mentioned in mythology. Out of these 16 basic steps, some are related to body hygiene and they involve washing feet first and then hands followed by mouth and finally the body. Washing of the feet is the most important as they are the ones which carry infections into one’s house.

Cleaning of mouth involves – cleaning of teeth with one finger, gums with two fingers, tongue with three fingers and palate with thumb.

Abhishekam or the snana of the body involves multiple steps. Ancient steps have been washing the body with milk water (rose water etc.) followed by rubbing with curd (soap), honey (moisturizers), ghee (oil), sugar (the drying agent) and finally with milk water again. It provides the natural type of bathing and not dependent on soap.

Servant Hygiene: The most important hygiene at our home is that of servant. Servants in our house are often given soap at the start of the month and they are supposed to continue using that soap for a month. If by any chance, they lose that soap in 2–3 weeks’ time, they fear in asking the owners for soap and they may end up washing their hands without soap for the next 2–3 weeks which includes washing of hands in morning.

Nails hygiene: is also one of the most important hygiene because they are responsible for causation of water and food disease. Therefore, for food handlers this hygiene is very important.

Vaccine hygiene: For food handlers it is very important to give typhoid vaccines and de–worming tablets every three months.

Science behind Shiva the Neelkanth

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The blue neck Shiva called Neelkanth symbolizes that one should neither take out the vices or negative emotions nor suppress them. Instead one should alter or modify them.

The blue colour in mythology symbolizes slow poison that includes attachments, anger, greed, desires and ego. Blue neck means to hold on the negative emotions temporarily so that it can be neutralized at appropriate time.

Suppressed anger releases chemicals which can lead to acidity, asthma, angina, future heart attacks and diarrhea etc. Similarly expressed anger can cause social unhealthiness and acute heart disease.

The only way to mange anger is to take the right and not the convenient action. One should neutralize anger by willful cultivation of opposite, positive of different thoughts.

Anger is a known risk factor for heart blockages. Anger can evoke physiological responses that are potentially life threatening in the setting of underlying heart blockages. It has a dominant influence on the severity, frequency, and treatment of angina.

This Vedic message of Shiva is being validated by many western scientists.

Anger has many phases

1. Anger Expression Inventory
2. Assesses anger frequency (trait anger)
3. Anger intensity
4. Anger expression (anger–out)
5. Anger suppression (anger–in)
6. Anger recall.

Both anger–in and anger–out are associated with heart blockades.

a. Dr. C. Noel Bairey Merz, from Women’s Health at Cedars–Sinai Medical Center has shown women who outwardly express anger (anger–out) are at increased risk especially if they also have other risk factors like age, diabetes and high cholesterol levels. The findings are a part of Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation Study, a multi–center, long–term investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

b. Anger–in is also related to severity of blockages. Dr. TM Dembroski in 1985 has shown that potential for Hostility and Anger–In are significantly and positively associated with the heart blockages disease severity, including angina symptoms and number of heart attacks. Suppressed anger is also associated with increased carotid arterial stiffness in older adults, a condition making them prone to future heart attacks and paralysis.

c. In univariate correlational analysis by Anderson DE from National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, Maryland in 2006 has shown a significant positive association of anger–in with artery stiffness.

d. Suppressed anger has also been shown to increase blood pressure by Thomas and group from University of Tennessee.

e. Recall of suppressed anger has been shown by Dr D Jain in 2001 from Yale University to be associated with angina, heart LV dysfunction and rise in upper blood pressure.

f. G Ironson and colleagues from Department of Psychology, University of Miami in 1992 has shown that anger recall produces more stress than the actual stress in a treadmill. Intensity of anger was associated with severity of angina. In the study vasoconstriction only occurred with high levels of anger. There also showed that there was no narrowing of non–narrowed arteries indicating that anger recall produce coronary vasoconstriction in previously narrowed coronary arteries.

Science behind regrets

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a US–based study, dying people were asked about their regrets, if any. The top five regrets were:

1. I wish I had the courage to live a life I wanted to live and not what others expected me to live.
2. I wish I had worked harder.
3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.
4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
5. I wish I had let myself to be happier.

Regrets are always based on suppression of emotions or non-fulfillment of desires and needs. These need–based desires can be at the level of physical body, mind, intellect, ego or the soul. Therefore, regrets can be at any of these levels.

I did a survey of 15 of my patients and asked them a simple question that if they come to know that they are going to die in next 24 hours, what would be their biggest regret.

Only one of them, a doctor said that she would have no regrets.

Only one person expressed a physical regret and that was from a Yoga expert who said that her regret was not getting married till that day.

Mental regrets were two.

1. A state trading businessman said, “I wish I could have taken care of my parents.”
2. A homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have given more time to my family.”

Intellectual regrets were three.

1. A lawyer said, “I wish I could have become something in life.”
2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have helped more people.”
3. A retired revenue inspector said, “I wish had married my younger child.”

Egoistic regrets were two.

1. One fashion designer said, “I wish I could have become a singer.”
2. A housewife said, “I wish I could have become a dietician.”

Spiritual regrets were six.

1. A Consultant Government Liaison officer said, “I wish I could have made my family members happy.”
2. A businessman said, “I wish I could have meditated more.”
3. A Homeopathic doctor said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my family.”
4. A reception executive said, “I wish I could have spent more time with my parents.”
5. An entertainment CEO said, “I wish I could have taken my parents for a pilgrimage.”
6. A fashion designer said, “I wish I could have worked more for the animals.”

In a very popular and successful movie, Kal Ho Na Ho, the hero was to die in the next 40 days. When asked to remember the days of his life, he could not remember 20 ecstatic instances in life. This is what happens with each one of us where we waste all our days and cannot remember more than 50 or 20 of such instances. If we are given 40 days to live and if we live every day ecstatically, we can get inner happiness. Therefore, we should learn to live in the present instead of having a habit of postponing everything we do.

We should learn to prioritize our work and do difficult work first otherwise we will be worrying all the time till that work is over.

I teach my patients that they should practice confession exercise and one of the confessions is to talk about your regrets and take them as challenge and finish before the next Tuesday. When working, there are three things which are to be remembered – passion, profession and fashion. Profession is at the level of mind, ego and spirit.

We should convert our profession in such a manner that it is fashionable and passionate. Passion means working from the heart and profession means working from mind and intellect and fashion means working the same at the level of ego which is based on show–off.

The Science Of Power

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Power is the ability to influence others to get a work done the way you want it.

We have seen evolution in the way power works. There was a era when Brahmins ruled using the power of knowledge, then came an era of Kshatriya who ruled using the physical power. This was followed by an era of Vaishyas ruling the world with the power of money and a time will come when Shudras will rule with the power of their work.

In one of his lectures, Deepak Jain from Kellogg’s said that the world has seen eras of physical power, economical power and the time has come that it will now be ruled by the power of human resources.

Former Governor of Mizoram A R Kohli, in one of his talks, said that there are four types of powers which govern the universe and these are – physical power, economical power, the power of the chair (ego) and the power of the human resource which is based on consciousness.

Everyone has these four inherent powers. The physical power is based on fear, tamas and rajas. The economical and the power of chair are linked to one’s ego and rajas. It is the power of human resource which is linked to the soul, consciousness and Satva.

The physical power is at the level of body, economic power is at the level of mind, the power of chair is at the level of intellect and ego and the power of human resources is at the level of soul. It is the power of human resource which is based on Dharma and is universally accepted by all religions.

As per Mahabharata, the powers are the power of human resource (righteousness or Yudhisthir), power to remained focused (Arjun), power to fight injustice (Bheem), power to help others (Sahdev) and power to remain neutral during any adversity (Nakul).

In Vedic sciences, these powers are also defined as Ichhashakti (the power of desires to be with the consciousness), Kriyashakti (the power to do selfless work), gyanshakti (the power to learn about consciousness), chit shakti (the power to take conscious based decisions) and anand shakti (the power for inner happiness).

The power of human resources talks about cultivating relationships. It is not based on the principles of survival of the fittest which is an animal behavior. The power of human resource believes in training and developing everyone to survive and become the fittest of the fit.

Today the only thing observed in Navratre is food-fast for nine days and most of us either do not eat anything or eat only limited food during these days.

Fast does not mean ‘not eating’. Rather it basically means controlling the desires and simultaneously cultivating positive mental attitudes. Desires can be of many types. Desires to eat tasty food, desires to smell, desire to listen to a particular music, desire to watch beautiful things, etc.

Fast therefore can be of many types. Food fast means controlling the desires for food items which you otherwise may not resist to eat. Eye fast means, not watching things which are Rajsic in nature. Ear fast means avoiding listening to Rajsic (stimulating) music. Action fast means not indulging into activities which stimulates and creates Rajsic thoughts in the mind, and speech fast means not speaking anything evil, etc.

In Navratre during the first, three days, a person is required to indulge into activities which reduce the negativity in the body. The physical purification involves regular bath (of the external body as well as various orifices); mental bath which involve self-confession exercises, and willful attempts not to think negative. During these three days, a person tries to restrain himself from thinking, speaking or doing any activity which can harm the other person. The five obstacles to internal happiness are attachment, anger, desire, greed and ego. A person tries to restrain from all these negativities. These negative thoughts should also not be suppressed or repressed as otherwise they will manifest into some internal diseases.

The next three days, after the negativity in the mind has been reduced, involves building positivity in the mind by way of various positive mental exercises. These involve mixing up with people, sharing, giving, donating, socializing, reception, etc. Cultivating an opposite thought to a negative thought in the mind is the easiest way of tackling the negative thought. Calling all the people you know during these three days helps in creating social health.

The same was taught by Gandhi Ji as “ do not see evil, do not hear evil and do not speak evil”

The last three days involves reading and understanding good scriptures and learning from the sins of others.

Once you have concurred the negativity in the first three days (representing Kali) and have built up happiness and positivity in the mind (representing Lakshmi) the only thing left is to acquire spiritual knowledge (representing Saraswati). During these last three days a person is purified enough to understand and grasp the knowledge of ‘Self’ and to understands and discriminate between good and bad. One also learns to stay cool irrespective of the face of life being joyful or disturbing. One learns to continue his actions while detaching it with the results.

After the nine days of self-discipline is complete, the person acquires inner happiness which is nothing but one’s exposure or appointment with the true self or the consciousness ( Rama). That is what Dusshera is with killing of Tamas (Kumbhakarana), Rajas ( Meghnath) and ego (Ravana).

And the birth of consciousness is equivalent to being in touch with birth of Lord Rama which is called “Ramnavmi”. Hence we should celebrate Ramnavmi as a disciplined way of acquiring internal happiness and not as a forced nine days of fasting.

The same interpretation lies in the Navratre ending up with Dusshera the win over the ego and attaining inner happiness.

Science behind complacency

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One should never be complacent as it may end up in a disaster or a failure. It is a common occurrence in the Indian cricket team who after winning a few matches becomes complacent and then starts behaving miserably.

Complacency leads to euphoria with resultant sympathetic over activity which can impair performance and also can cause performance anxiety. The classical tale of rabbit and tortoise explains this phenomenon where a non-complacent tortoise wins the race from the rabbit. Apart from Cricket this is also seen commonly in Indian politics. A team after winning election becomes complacent and instead of working for the welfare of the society, it starts taking public for granted and ends up in disaster later.