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Dr K K Aggarwal

Panchamrit body wash

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Panchamrit is taken as a Prasadam and is also used to wash the deity. In Vedic language, anything which is offered to God can also be done to the human body. Panchamrit bath, therefore, is the original and traditionally full bath prescribed in Vedic literature. It consists of the following:

  • Washing the body with milk and water, where milk acts like a soothing agent.
  • Next is washing the body with curd, which is a substitute for soap and washes away the dirt from the skin.
  • The third step is washing the body with desi ghee, which is like an oil massage.
  • Fourth is washing the body with honey, which works like a moisturizer.
  • Last step is to rub the skin with sugar or khand. Sugar works as a scrubber.

Panchamrit bath is much more scientific, cheaper and health friendly.

Panchamrit body wash

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Panchamrit body wash

Panchamrit is taken as a Prasadam and is also used to wash the deity. In Vedic language, anything which is offered to God can also be done to the human body. Panchamrit bath, therefore, is the original and traditionally full bath prescribed in Vedic literature. It consists of the following:

  1. Washing the body with milk and water, where milk acts like a soothing agent.
  2. Next is washing the body with curd, which is a substitute for soap and washes away the dirt from the skin.
  3. The third step is washing the body with desi ghee, which is like an oil massage.
  4. Fourth is washing the body with honey, which works like a moisturizer.
  5. Last step is to rub the skin with sugar or khand. Sugar works as a scrubber.

Panchamrit bath is much more scientific, cheaper and health friendly.

Panchamrit body wash

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Panchamrit body wash

Panchamrit is taken as a Prasadam and is also used to wash the deity. In Vedic language, anything which is offered to God can also be done to the human body. Panchamrit bath, therefore, is the original and traditionally full bath prescribed in Vedic literature.

It consists of the following:

  • Washing the body with milk and water, where milk acts like a soothing agent.
  • Next is washing the body with curd, which is a substitute for soap and washes away the dirt from the skin.
  • The third step is washing the body with desi ghee, which is like an oil massage.
  • Fourth is washing the body with honey, which works like a moisturizer.
  • Last step is to rub the skin with sugar or khand. Sugar works as a scrubber.

Panchamrit bath is much more scientific, cheaper and health friendly.

The Scientific Aspects of Prayer

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Whenever our near or dear ones suffer a sickness most of us often pass on the heartfelt promise that we’ll “pray for him or her”. So many people believe in the power of prayer that it’s now caught the attention of scientific doctors.

Today most hospitals and nursing homes are building prayer rooms for their patients. It is based on the principle that the relaxed mind is a creative mind. During prayer, when one is in touch with the consciousness, one is able to take conscious based right decisions. Most doctors even write on their prescriptions “I treat He cures”.

Medically it has been shown that even the subconscious mind of the unconscious person is listening. Any prayer would be captured by him building his or her inner confidence and faith to come out of the terminal sickness. We have seen the classical example of the effect of mass prayer on Amitabh Bachchan’s illness.

“Praying for your health is one of the most common complementary treatments people do on their own,” said Dr. Harold G. Koenig, co–director of the Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health at Duke University Medical Center. About 90% of Americans and almost 100 % Indians pray at some point in their lives, and when they’re under stress, such as when they’re sick, they’re even more likely to pray.

More than one–third of people surveyed in a recent study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine said they often turned to prayer when faced with medical concerns. In the poll involving more than 2,000 Americans, 75 percent of those who prayed said they prayed for wellness, while 22 percent said they prayed for specific medical conditions.

Numerous randomized studies have been done on this subject. In one such study, neither patients nor the health–care providers had any idea who was being prayed for. The coronary–care unit patients didn’t even know there was a study being conducted. And, those praying for the patients had never even met them. The result: While those in the prayer group had about the same length of hospital stay, their overall health was slightly better than the group that didn’t receive special prayers.

“Prayer may be an effective adjunct to standard medical care,” wrote the authors of this 1999 study, also published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. However, a more recent trial from the April 2006 issue of the American Heart Journal suggests that it’s even possible for some harm to come from prayer. In this study, which included 1,800 people scheduled for heart surgery, the group who knew they were receiving prayers developed more complications from the procedure, compared to those who had not been a focus of prayer.

Many patients are reluctant and do not talk on this subject with their doctors. Only 11% patients mention prayer to their doctors. But, doctors are more open to the subject than patients realize, particularly in serious medical situations. In a study of doctors’ attitudes toward prayer and spiritual behavior, almost 85 percent of doctors thought they should be aware of their patients’ spiritual beliefs. Most doctors said they wouldn’t pray with their patients even if they were dying, unless the patient specifically asked the doctor to pray with them. In that case, 77% of doctors were willing to pray for their patient.

Most people are convinced that prayer helps. Some people are ‘foxhole religious’ types and prayer’s almost a reaction or cry to the universe for help. But, many people do it because they’ve experienced benefit from it in the past.

If it’s something you want to do and you feel it might be helpful, there’s no reason you shouldn’t do it. If one has inclination that prayer might work, he or she should do it.

Should doctors detach themselves?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In dealing with patients the traditional Patient–Doctor relationship model has been that doctor should remain cool, calm and collected at all times.

Doctor’s approach needs to be strictly scientific, logical, objective, methodical precise and dispassionate. This model has been since the era of William Osler, the father of modern medicine. The term used is imperturbability which means coolness and presence of mind under all circumstances.

Osler said a rare and precious gift to doctor is right of detachment. The right of detachment insulates the doctors and protects them from the powerful emotions that patients display in their presence like anger, frustration, grief, rage and bewilderment. It also insulates patients from the rolling emotions that doctors may at times feel towards them.

However, a detached attitude also insulates doctors from empathizing with patients. A detached doctor may talk in a language that is over patient’s head.

Detachment is not like a light switch that you can turn on and off to suit the situation. Detachment as a practice cannot be in isolation if it becomes your personal style of distracting from the world, it may not be just for the patients but also from your colleague, family friends and even yourself.

I recall when I joined by hospital the first lesson given to me by my boss was not to get unduly attached with patients. As etiquette, we were taught not to socialize with patients. Even today the new American Guidelines talk that doctors should not socialize with their patients on social media including Facebook. Even doctors are human beings and their personal life should not be known to the patients. As far as law suits are concerned, it is equally true that known close patient’s file a law suit much more than unknown people because over a period of time they know your weakness. One should learn to empathize with the patients and yet be detached from its results. Doctors who follow Bhagwat Geeta understand this concept very well.

Sacrifice a goat and clear the board exam : Its scientific

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“Students in tribal-dominated Jhabua district in Madhya Pradesh and adjoining villages in Gujarat believe that sacrificing got can make them pass an exam.  Ranapur, 45 km from Jhabua, an idol of Baba Dongar, a tribal god is making all wishes come true. Here, photocopies of exam admit cards are tied around trees and in return for their entreaties coming true, the supplicants promise to offer the god a goat, a hen or a bottle of liquor. Some 500 animals are sacrificed here every day and there are more than a dozen such priests who do the slaughtering.”

The above story is published in TOI and is correct as per mythology provided one understands the mythology.

In mythology riding means controlling and sacrificing means killings and animals are symbolized by human natures and behaviors.

For example mouse is a vahan of Ganesha and means that to overcome obstacles one need to control one’s greed. Similarly own is the vahan of Laxmi and means that for righteous earning one should be able to control one’s foolishness.

Goats and Rams represent sexuality and sexual desires and lambs represent purity and innocence.

Goat is mentioned in mythology both as a symbol and as a vehicle of Gods. In the Samkhya system Prakriti is depicted as a female goat (Mother Nature). The color of goat is red, black or white representing Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas.

The vehicle of Goddess Kali is a black goat. Agni rides Mesha – a ram. Kubera, the god of wealth, also has a ram as his vehicle. A ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep.

Sacrificing during exams means controlling your tamas or inertia and rajas or aggression, and controlling your sexual desires (un-castrated males).

Brahmacharya in mythology is a period where you are supposed to keep your sexual deviations and other desires under control. So goat sacrifice does not mean physical killing of goat but killing of goat like activities within you.