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Dr K K Aggarwal

Self-esteem in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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For spirituality, one needs to control two things, first, lust and then the ego. Among, Kama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era to Kans. One should learn to kill the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’s Yuga, Kans is killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna. Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

• The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves, which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.

• Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protects Krishna when Vasudev takes him out in the rain.

• Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind (Moon) using positive flow of thoughts (ganga) with ego controlled (naag)

• In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increased his size.

• No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala, which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.

Self-esteem in Mythology

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Self-esteem in Mythology

For spirituality, one needs to control two things, first, lust and then the ego. Among, Kama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era to Kans. One should learn to kill the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’s Yuga, Kans is killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna.

Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

• The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves, which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.

• Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protects Krishna when Vasudev takes him out in the rain.

• Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind (Moon) using positive flow of thoughts (ganga) with ego controlled (naag)

• In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increased his size.

• No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala, which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.

Low Self Esteem

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Low Self Esteem

Low self esteem is opposite of ego. Supportive psychotherapy is often used to treat depression by improving self esteem.

Low self–esteem always develops when one compares their skill or knowledge with somebody else. We often forget that for passing marks, we only need 50%. One who passes with 50% is a good student.

But the same person, when compares himself or herself with a student who has got 90%, he or she feels that his education was inferior as he was not as competent as others.

Remember that one is required to possess average degree of knowledge and skill and not the maximum degree of skill and knowledge. In the society, one needs to possess only average degree of skill and knowledge.

For example, if a person has passed MBBS with 50% marks, he or she is allowed to practice medicine with full powers and respect. There may be chances when a person who is 90 percentile may be able to take some better decisions but the same does not make him a superior doctor.

The fundamental principle in self–esteem is to make a person proud of his personal knowledge and skills and also to bring out his or her uniqueness.

Passion and profession are two different things. We should judge an individual from is passion and not profession.

Self-esteem in Mythology

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Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Self-esteem in Mythology

For spirituality, one needs to control two things, firstly, lust and lastly, the ego. In Kaama, Krodha, Lobha, Moha and Ahankara, ego and lust both are slow poisons and do not allow one to be spiritual healthy. There are many examples of how to control ego in mythology. Fundamentally, it is said that one should learn to kill ego of oneself and never hurt the ego of others.

Ego in Ramayana is equated to Ravana and in Krishna’s era toKans.One should learn to kills the ego. In Ramayana, Kumbhkarana is Tamas killed by the self i.e. Rama, Meghnath is Rajas and is killed by the mind i.e. Lakshman and ego, the Ravana, is killed again by self i.e. Rama. In Krishna’sYugaKansis killed by consciousness or Lord Krishna.

 Mythology also teaches us to keep our ego under control.

1. The door of any temple is always low in height so that nobody can enter without bending. Bending is sign of humility. Most temples have caves which have the same significance. Older the temple longer will be the cave and smaller will be the entry gate.

2. Ego in mythology is depicted by Sheshnaaga or Cobra snake with its hood directed inwards indicating keeping your ego under control. The Sheshnaaga over Vishnu when he is resting indicates the same. In Krishna’s birth also, the snake represents controlled ego and protectsKrishnawhen Vasu dev takes him out in the rain.

3.      Lord Shiva is also shown wearing a snake in his neck with hood directed inwards. Shiva is also said to have a blue neck or Neelkanth indicating that to control anger one should neutralize the anger continuously (matted hairs) with cool mind ( Moon) using positive flow of thoughts
(ganga) with ego controlled ( naag)

4. In Hanuman ki Lanka Yatra, Sursa snake is handled by Hanuman with humility. Sursa, the ego, went on increasing in size when Hanuman increases his size.

5.  No Hindu marriage is complete without Varmala which again indicates the need to bow in front of each other.