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Dr K K Aggarwal

Relieve stress by changing the interpretation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Stress is the reaction of the body or the mind to the interpretation of a known situation. Stress management, therefore, involves either changing the situation, changing the interpretation or taming the body the yogic way in such a way that stress does not affect the body.

Every situation has two sides. Change of interpretation means looking at the other side of the situation. It is something like half glass of water, which can be interpreted as half empty or half full.

Studies have shown that anger, hostility and aggression are the new risk factors for heart disease. Even recall of anger has been reported to precipitate a heart attack.

Many studies have shown that when doctors talk positive in front of unconscious patients in ICU, their outcome is better than those in whose presence doctors talk negative.

The best way to practice spiritual medicine is to experience silence in the thoughts, speech and action. Simply walking in the nature with silence in the mind and experiencing the sounds of nature can be as effective as 20 minutes of meditation. He said that 20 minutes of meditation provides the same physiological parameters as that of seven hours of deep sleep.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Stress is the reaction of the body and mind to the interpretation of a known situation

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Stress is the reaction of the body and mind to the interpretation of a known situation

You cannot be stressed unless you know the person, place or the situation. The same situation may or may not cause stress unless it is interpreted in such a way that it is uncomfortable to the person, and then it causes stress.

Management of stress, therefore, involves either removing the known situation or changing one’s interpretation or preparing the body in such a way that the stress does not affect mind and the body. But, removing the known situation may not be possible all the time. For example, if you are stressful in a job, resigning may not be feasible.

The modality, therefore, is to change your interpretation towards the stressful situation for which one should start thinking positively and different and choose the resultant options within, which do not hurt the heart.

Changing of the interpretation is what in allopathy is described as cognitive behavior therapy, the origin of which comes from Ayurveda and in Bhagwad Gita where Lord Krishna counsels Arjuna following principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

In the first chapter, Lord Krishna only listens to Arjuna explaining the importance of listening, listening and listening. The second counseling session or the second chapter is the longest conversation between Arjuna and Krishna and shows the importance of first effective counseling session. From 3rd to 17th chapters, Krishna explains what he has conveyed in chapter 2 and that tells us the importance of reasoning out every doubt that a person under stress has. During this session, Krishna creates both fear as well as consoles Arjuna again indicating the importance of these two factors in counseling. In the last chapter, Krishna revises what he has taught, which is consistent with the last rule of counseling to make sure that the patient has learnt what has been taught to him.

Apart from counseling, the body can be prepared in such a way that stress does not bother one. This can be done by learning the art of pranayam, relaxation, meditation, regular exercise, Dosh–specific diet and using certain Ayurvedic Rasayans, which sterilize the brain functions. Brahmi, an Ayurvedic herb, is one such Rasayan, which boosts the brain.

One should avoid taking allopathic anti–anxiety drugs, unless necessary which, of course, may be required in an acute panic state.