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Dr K K Aggarwal

Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Pace yourself: Keep going, but don’t risk overtaxing yourself. Instead of burning through all your battery life in two hours, spread it out between morning tasks, afternoon tasks, and evening activities, with rest and meals between.
  2. Take a walk or a nap: However, if you have trouble sleeping at night, napping can make the insomnia worse. If that’s the case for you, get moving instead. Get up and walk around the block, or just get up and move around. If you are not an insomniac, enjoy that 20– to 30–minute power nap.
  3. Skip most supplements: There is no evidence that they works.
  • DHEA: There is no evidence that dehydroepiandrosterone or DHEA offers any real benefits.
  • Iron. Iron only improves energy if you are clearly deficient.
  • B vitamins. It is true that B vitamins (B1, B2, B6 and B12) help the body convert food into the form of energy that cells can burn, but taking more B vitamins does not supercharge your cells.

4. Fuel up wisely: A sugary bakery roll delivers plenty of calories, but your body tends to metabolize them faster, and then you can end up with sinking blood sugar and fatigue. You’ll maintain a steadier energy level by eating lean protein and unrefined carbohydrates. Try low–fat yogurt with a sprinkling of nuts, raisins, and honey

Supplements May Cut LDL in Older Women

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Postmenopausal women taking calcium and vitamin D supplements had improved lipid profiles compared with those taking placebo as per a new study.

In an analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative, the level of LDL cholesterol was lower by an average of 4.46 mg/dL in the women on active treatment reported Peter F. Schnatz, DO, of Reading Hospital in Pennsylvania in the journal menopause.

In addition, higher concentrations of 25–hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) were associated with higher levels of HDL cholesterol and lower levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

Supplements May Cut LDL in Older Women

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Supplements May Cut LDL in Older Women

Postmenopausal women taking calcium and vitamin D supplements had improved lipid profiles compared with those taking placebo as per a new study.

In an analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative, the level of LDL cholesterol was lower by an average of 4.46 mg/dL in the women on active treatment reported Peter F. Schnatz, DO, of Reading Hospital in Pennsylvania in the journal menopause.

In addition, higher concentrations of 25–hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) were associated with higher levels of HDL cholesterol and lower levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

Natural foods and not supplements prevent heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Natural foods and not supplements prevent heart disease

One should eat seasonal and locally grown natural food and vegetables grown out of organic farms. Eat less, dinner lighter then lunch, eat natural and in moderation– are few of the mantras.

Eating food supplements can be harmful. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), supplementation with beta carotene and vitamin E, either alone or in combination with each other or other antioxidant vitamins does not prevent heart disease.

High dose vitamin E supplementation (400 IU/day) may be associated with an increase in all–cause mortality.

Supplementation with vitamin C does not prevent a second heart attack.

Beta carotene supplementation may be dangerous and should be discouraged.

Vitamin E supplementation may be of benefit for only secondary prevention of heart patients with chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis.

As per the AHA, current data do not justify the use of antioxidant supplements for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease risk.

The above recommendations apply to supplementation only. Diets that are rich in natural antioxidants are associated with lower cardiovascular mortality.

Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Harvard 4 simple ways to boost your energy

Pace yourself: Keep going, but don’t risk overtaxing yourself. Instead of burning through all your battery life in two hours, spread it out between morning tasks, afternoon tasks, and evening activities — with rest and meals between.
Take a walk or a nap: However, if you have trouble sleeping at night, napping can make the insomnia worse. If that’s the case for you, get moving instead. Get up and walk around the block, or just get up and move around. If you are not an insomniac, enjoy that 20– to 30–minute power nap.
Skip most supplements: There is no evidence that they works.
DHEA: There is no evidence that DHEA offers any real benefits.
Iron. Iron only improves energy if you are clearly deficient.
B vitamins. It is true that B vitamins (B1, B2, B6 and B12) help the body convert food into the form of energy that cells can burn, but taking more B vitamins doesn’t supercharge your cells.
Fuel up wisely: A sugary bakery roll delivers plenty of calories, but your body tends to metabolize them faster, and then you can end up with sinking blood sugar and fatigue. You’ll maintain a steadier energy level by eating lean protein and unrefined carbohydrates. Try low–fat yogurt with a sprinkling of nuts, raisins, and honey

Natural foods and not supplements prevent heart disease

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Natural foods and not supplements prevent heart disease

One should take seasonal and locally grown natural food and vegetables grown out of organic farms. Eat less, dinner lighter then lunch, eat natural and in moderation- are few of the mantras.

Eating food supplements can be harmful. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), supplementation with beta carotene and vitamin E, either alone or in combination with each other or other antioxidant vitamins does not prevent heart disease.

High dose vitamin E supplementation (400 IU/day) may be associated with an increase in all-cause mortality.

Supplementation with vitamin C does not prevent a second heart attack.

Beta carotene supplementation may be dangerous and should be discouraged.

Vitamin E supplementation may be of benefit for only secondary prevention of heart patients with chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis.

The AHA concluded that current data do not justify the use of antioxidant supplements for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease risk.

The above recommendations apply to supplementation only. Diets that are rich in natural antioxidants are associated with lower cardiovascular mortality.