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Dr K K Aggarwal

Is caffeine good for health?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Caffeine is the most consumed stimulant in the world in the form of coffee and tea.

Currently, there is lack of scientific data for promoting or discouraging coffee and/or tea consumption in the daily diet.

Short-term benefits of caffeine intake include mental alertness and improved athletic performance.

Short-term adverse effects include headache, anxiety, tremors and insomnia.

Long-term adverse effects include generalized anxiety disorder and substance abuse disorders.

Long-term benefits are dose-dependent. Caffeine is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, alcoholic cirrhosis and gout. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee have been linked with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

Heavy coffee intake may trigger coronary and arrhythmic events in susceptible individuals, although coffee intake is not considered a long-term risk factor for myocardial disease.

Most studies show a modest inverse relationship between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality.

Caffeine withdrawal is a well-known clinical syndrome, with headache being the most common symptom.

(Source: Uptodate)

Common Cold

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Common Cold

  • It is a benign self-limiting syndrome caused by several viruses.
  • It is one of the most frequent acute illnesses.
  • The term ‘common cold’ refers to a mild upper respiratory viral illness presenting with sneezing, nasal congestion, nasal discharge, low grade fever, headache and malaise.
  • Common cold is not the same as influenza or common sore throat, which can also involve the heart.
  • Common cold affects a pre-school child 5-7 times in a year and an adult 2-3 times in a year.
  • It can spread by hand contact, by direct contact with the infected person or by indirect contact with a contaminated environmental surface.
  • It can also spread by small particle droplets that become airborne from sneezing or coughing.
  • It can also be transmitted via large particle droplets that typically require close contact with infected person.
  • Most important is hand to hand transmission of the virus.
  • Infection can also spread through circulating air in commercial airline passenger cabins.
  • Saliva does not spread any cold.
  • The disease is most infectious on the 2nd and 3rd day of illness.
  • However, a person may be infectious for up to two weeks.
  • Normal cold may last for 8-10 days.
  • The diagnosis is based on clinical findings.
  • Common cold can exacerbate asthma in susceptible individuals.

Common Cold

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Common Cold

  1. Common cold is a benign self–limiting syndrome caused by several viruses.
  2. It is one of the most frequent acute illnesses.
  3. The term ‘common cold’ refers to a mild upper respiratory viral illness presenting with sneezing, nasal congestion, nasal discharge, low grade fever, headache and malaise.
  4. Common cold is not the same as influenza or common sore throat, which can also involve the heart.
  5. Common cold affects a pre–school child 5–7 times in a year and adult 2–3 times in a year.
  6. It can spread by direct contact with the infected person or by indirect contact with a contaminated environmental surface.
  7. It can also spread by small particle droplets that become airborne from sneezing or coughing.
  8. It can also be transmitted via large particle droplets that typically require close contact with infected person.
  9. Most important is hand to hand transmission of the virus.
  10. Infection can also spread through circulating air in commercial airline passenger cabins.
  11. Saliva does not spread any cold.
  12. The disease is most infectious on the 2nd and 3rd day of illness.
  13. However, a person may be infectious for up to two weeks.
  14. Normal cold may last for 8–10 days.
  15. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings.
  16. Common cold can exacerbate asthma in susceptible individuals.