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Dr K K Aggarwal

What Is The Importance Of Silence?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The true silence is the silence between the thoughts and represents the true self, consciousness or the soul. It is a web of energized information ready to take all provided there is a right intent. The process of achieving silence is what meditation is.

Observing silence is another way of getting benefits of meditation. Many yogis in the past have recommended and observed silence now and then. Mahatma Gandhi used to spend one day of each week in silence. He believed that abstaining from speaking brought him inner peace and happiness. All such days he used to communicated with others only by writing on paper.

Hindu principles also talks about a correlation between mauna (silence) and shanty (harmony). Mauna Ekadashi is a ritual followed traditionally in our country. On this day the person is not supposed to speak at all and keep complete silence throughout day & night. It gives immense peace to the mind and strength to the body. In Jainism this ritual has a lot of importance. Nimith was a great saint in Jainism who long ago asked all Jains to observe this vrata. Some people recommend that on every ekadashi one should observe silence if not the whole day but for few hours in a day.

Deepak Chopra in his book 7 Laws of Spiritual Success talks in great detail about the importance of observing silence in day today life. He recommends everyone should observe silence for 20 minutes everyday. Silence helps redirecting our imagination towards self from the outer atmosphere. Even Swami Sivananda in his teaches recommend to observe mauna daily for 2 hours for ekadashi, take milk and fruits everyday, study daily one chapter of Bhagwad Gita, do regular charity and donate one-tenth of the income in the welfare of the society. Ekadashi is the 11th day of Hindu lunar fortnight. Ekadashi is the day of celebration occurring twice a month, meant for meditation and increasing soul consciousness. Vinoba Bhave was the great sage of our country who is known for this bhoodaan movement. He was a great advocator and practical preacher of mauna vrata.

Mauna means silence and vrata means bow hence mauna vrata means bow of silence. Mauna was practiced by saints to end enmity and recoup their enmity. Prolonged silence as the form of silence is observed by the rishi munis involved for prolonged periods of silence. Silence is a source of all that exists. Silence is where conscious dwells. There is no religious tradition which does not talk about silence. It removes worldly communication and forces a dialogue towards inner communication that one reason why all prayer, meditation and worship or any other practice whether we attune our mains to the spiritual consciousness within are done in silence. After the death of a person it is a practice to observe silence for two minutes. The immediate benefits is that it saves a tremendous amount of energy.

Silence is cessation of both sensory and mental activity. It is like having a still mind and listening to the inner mind. Behind this screen of our internal dialogue is the silence of spirit. Meditation is the combination of observing silence and the art of observation.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own

Krishna: The Messenger of Love and Happiness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Krishna teaches us the path of acquiring inner happiness. It can be understood by the four cycles of Krishna described in the Vedic literature: Krishna the Child, Krishna the Husband and Friend, Krishna the Preacher and Krishna the Sanyasi.

The childhood of Krishna describes the methodology and components of a child education. Krishna, pure consciousness, was born as the eight child of Devki representing that during pregnancy one needs to follow the eight limbs of yoga to get a child with no disease.

Initial childhood is full of pure consciousness that spreads love to everyone without any discrimination. The only thing the child during this period does is to steal and spread love and that is what Krishna as Makhan Chor depicts.With time the child’s mental faculty starts developing and distracting the child’s mind. During this phase of life, the child needs to be taught to control the thoughts and mind by learning viveka (discrimination between good and bad) and doing abhyas or hard work. The episode of Krishna entering into the pond (thoughts) fighting with Kaliya (duality of mind) and controlling it represents the same. This also coincides with the time a child should be sent to the school.The next phase of childhood is activation of intellect which in Krishna’s life is depicted as the questions in his mind “Radha kyun gori, main kyun kala?” The incident is during Krishna playing Holi with Gopis and Radha. This happens when the child gets an exposure to the worldly atmosphere and starts getting attached to it. This is the time for the child to be taught control of mind and intellect by one point concentration on the object of concentration. This is also the time when the child should be taught the purpose of life, and the aim for which he has to live in future (usually adolescent by this time).

Krishna controls the intellect by winning over Indra (intellect) and raising the Govardhan Parvat (turmoil of the mind) on one finger and saves the public from the rainy storm (wavering thoughts). The one finger here indicates one point concentration on the object of concentration. Once the child is taught how to control the intellect, he or she completes spiritual education and learns about the true self.

Control of mind (Kalia) and intellect (Indra) leads the child to the next phase of life. In Krishna’s life it coincides with Ras Leela where Krishna is seen dancing with Radha and every Gopi. This also reflects the time for the internal ego to get killed and one acquires the qualities of humility. Killing of Kansa depicts the killing of ego. Once the ego is killed and humility is acquired, Radha and flute are no more required and Krishna is now a perfect man and is ready to enter the next ashram of life called Grahasthashram. Radha (body) gets merged with consciousness and flute (humility) is a part of the nature. One now acquires a sudarshan chakra or a weapon to take decisions and adopt the good and kill the evil.

Krishna is always depicted as a blue color God with yellow clothes and a flute in his hands. Blue color indicates everything is possible and yellow clothes indicate that one can acquire it provided one has the flute, a hollow wood representing egoless nature.

Whenever Krishna is shown with a flute, the female figure with him is Radha with blue sari and yellow color, along with gopis (thoughts) dancing around them indicating that the thoughts of the mind are in symphony with each other and there is a union of mind, body and soul. Here the soul is represented by Krishna, mind by the flute, thoughts with gopis and body with Radha.

The second phase of Krishna’s life is shown as a perfect achiever and friend, which is evident from the story of Sudama.

The third phase of Krishna’s life represents Krishna as an advisor, which shows his role in Mahabharata and his preaching in Bhagavad Gita. He teaches the message of Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Gnana Yoga and Raja Yoga for acquiring excellence in life and inner happiness.

The last role of Krishna as a sanyasi is the end of Krishna’s life. The four cycles also coincide with the four ashrams of life.To achieve inner happiness the message from Krishna’s life is to learn to make efforts to control the mind, to win over the intellect by one point concentration and to acquire qualities of humility and killing internal ego. Only with this can one become a perfect man like Krishna.

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the text are entirely my personal views)

Bhoot, Pret and Pishach

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In mythology, ‘Bhoot’ means the memories of known people whose unfulfilled desires keep on disturbing us. ‘Pret’ means the memories of unknown people whose unfulfilled desires keep coming to our mind during sleep and disturbing us. These unfulfilled desires of unknown people are instances that we may have forgotten but still reach us through the cloud internet. When these memories start disturbing our day to day life, they are defined as Pishach.

Bhoot, Pret and Pishach are seen only by some people and not everyone. That means that their attachment will only be with those with whom their unfulfilled desires were linked to.

This attachment disorder where the unfulfilled desires of the deceased person keep on coming to our mind during day time, night and in our dreams can be understood by a computer IT model used by porn sites.

People who own porn sites develop software by which a specific program can get transferred to our computer and whenever we open these sites the program file gets embedded in our computer in a secret location in such a way that whenever we open the computer, the specific will appear on the desktop or will become the preferred sites whenever we open the internet. The specific site only will automatically open even if we do not wish to open it.

These files are difficult to delete unless the computer is reformatted or an experienced IT professional is able to delete these files.

The attachment disorders and the unfulfilled desires of the deceased persons can be compared to this technology and can be explained why those thoughts keep on coming in our mind. Not only the thoughts, even the images of people keep coming into mind and they are difficult to get deleted.

How to remove negative thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Darkness is absence of light and similarly negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. The answer to negative thoughts is to bring positive thoughts back. Ideal mind is devils workshop and will always think negative.

Here are the ways

Think differently as taught by Adi Shankaracharya. Once Menaka approached Arjuna with lust and said that she wanted to have a son like him with him. Arjuna said that why wait for 25 years consider me as you son from today.
Think opposite as taught by Patanjali. For example if you are thinking of stealing, then silently start thinking of charity.
Think positive as taught by Buddha. Make a list of positive action to be done today as the first thing in the morning and concentrate on that list. Divert your mind to the pending works. It’s a type of behavioral therapy.

How to Remove Negative Thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on How to Remove Negative Thoughts

Darkness is absence of light and similarly negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts. The answer to negative thoughts is to bring back positive thoughts. An ideal mind is a devil’s workshop and will always think negative.

Here are some ways by which you can remove negative thoughts.

• Think differently as taught by Adi Shankaracharya. Once Menaka approached Arjuna with lust and said that she wanted to have a son like him with him. Arjuna said that why wait for 25 years consider me as you son from today.

• Think opposite as taught by Patanjali. For example if you are having a though to steal, silently start thinking of charity.

• Think positive as taught by Buddha. Make a list of positive actions to be done today as the first thing in the morning and concentrate on that list. Divert your mind to the pending works. It’s a type of behavioral therapy.

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts.

In Bhagavad Gita also it has been said that the period of Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, one acquires more positive thoughts as compared in Dakshinayana before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light.

Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and if the at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that the dying person’s thoughts become positive.

In terms of computer language, it can be explained as – when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and takes priority in the search engine as compared to other files.

As a living body we like to hug, kiss, touch and feel. But what happens when the person is dead. We do not like to touch it. If we do so also, we go and wash our hands and take a bath. We do not want to transport a dead body it back home in our own car; instead, we hire a harsh van. From hospital also, many do not want to take the body back home but prefer to keep it in the mortuary till it is taken to the cremation ground. Why this discrimination? Both weigh similar. The difference is the presence and absence of Brahman, the consciousness or the soul.

 Soul exists is the main gist of Upanishads. According to Sri Sankaracharya, one can sum up the entire message of Vedanta in three crisp aphorisms. ‘Brahma Satyam, Jagat Mithya, and Jivo Brahmaiva Naparah’.

 Brahma Satyam:

Brahman is the all-pervasive life principle, life force, or the pure consciousness. It is not the conditioned consciousness, which manifests at the level of brain and is under the influence of mind intellect and ego.

 It is the undisturbed state of consciousness which exists beyond time and space and is the silence between the thoughts.

 Consciousness is the ultimate truth, the timeless and transcendental reality. It exists first, and then matter follows after.

 If one look at matter one finds that the atoms, the electron, proton, etc. are perfectly created and organized. This can only happen if there was some intelligence working. That which exist before and has brought about such an orderly and beautiful creation, has to be a conscious entity. Consciousness alone has to be the first and eternal reality. Rest including the matter is created and is thus perishable.

 In Brahma Satyam, Brahman means consciousness and the word ‘Satya’ means that “which exists in all the three periods of time; – past, present and future and that which transcends time, and is thus timeless”.

 Jagat Mithya:

The word Jagat signifies the entire world, the cosmos, all ‘objects’ of our knowledge, includes both gross and subtle ‘objects’, the thoughts, emotions, the energy.

 That which is near or far, inside or outside, now or later, good or bad, everything is part of this Jagat.

 It is defined as ‘Jayate gachati iti Jagat’, i.e. ‘that which is born and dies is Jagat’. Birth and death are movements in time and that which is in time constantly changes.

 “Mithya” is that which is not present there in all three periods of time or ‘that which had a birth at a particular time and that which will certainly die at some point of time’.

 ‘Jagat Mithya’ thus implies that all what is there for experience is transient.

 Jivo Brahmaiva Naparah:

This sutra means that ‘every jiva – the apparent limited and finite entity – is basically the infinite and limitless Brahman and nothing else. Every Jiva is basically God himself with its limited identity.

 As a living body we like to hug, kiss, touch and feel. But what happens when the person is dead. We do not like to touch it. If we do so also, we go and wash our hands and take a bath. We do not want to transport a dead body back home in our own car; instead, we hire a harsh van. From hospital also, many do not want to take the body back home but prefer to keep it in the mortuary till it is taken to the cremation ground. Why this discrimination? Both weigh similar. The difference is the presence and absence of Brahman, the consciousness or the soul.

Soul exists is the main gist of Upanishads. According to Sri Sankaracharya, one can sum up the entire message of Vedanta in three crisp aphorisms ‘Brahma Satyam, Jagat Mithya, and Jivo Brahmaiva Naparah’.

Darkness is absence of light so are negative thoughts which are absence of positive thoughts. As per Deepak Chopra Negative thoughts can only be removed by inculcating positive thoughts. Vedanta has described various modalities regarding the same.

1.  Adi Shankarya in his book Bhag Govindum described that the negative thoughts can be modified (think differently) . He said that once a monk encountered a female with no cloths over the chest, instead of closing the eyes, he looked at them and imagined them as the organs from where he drank the milk while he was an infant. The initial vitiated thoughts vanished there and then.

2. Yoga Sutras of Patanjali has described that for negative thought one can willfully originate opposite thoughts (think opposite). For example if one is having a thought of stealing he or she can silently pass on the thoughts of charity to someone.

3. Buddha on the other hand said that to resolve negative thoughts one should think of any positive thoughts or do any positive acts, even if they are unrelated. (think positive)

4. Face and be aware of the negative thought as it will be only transient (do not think at all, let it happen): There’s a classic Zen story about two celibate monks who are walking on a pilgrimage. They come across a girl who is very lovely and beautiful who wants to cross the river. The young monk gets attracted to her, offers help and says, “I’ll take you on my shoulders and carry you across the river and drop you off on the other side.” He does that, and the two monks continue on their pilgrimage until after a while the old monk starts to have a frown on his face.

He’s upset. Six hours, seven hours go by, and finally he looks at the young one and says, “I can’t believe you did that.” “Did what?” the young monk asks. “You carried that woman on your shoulders.” “I dropped her off six hours ago,” the young monk says. And to the old monk he further responds, “But you’re still carrying her.”