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Dr K K Aggarwal

Childhood obesity increasing at an alarming rate around the world

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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The prevalence of obesity among children is increasing at an alarming rate. Overweight four-year-old children have twice the risk of high blood pressure by the age of six years. This heightens the risk of future heart attack and stroke. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed childhood obesity among the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century.

Obesity is a multifactorial disorder; unhealthy diet – eating foods high in fats, sugar and salt (junk food, processed food) and a sedentary lifestyle (TV, internet, computer and mobile games have taken precedence over outdoor sports) contribute significantly to this escalating epidemic. Women should lose those extra pounds before conceiving, avoid gaining excess weight during pregnancy, and quit smoking, as these are known risk factors for childhood obesity.

Most obese children grow up to have obesity in adulthood. Overweight and obese children are at risk of other lifestyle disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome later in life. They are more likely to have joint problems, sleep apnea and social and psychological problems.

Healthy habits in childhood lay a foundation for a healthier adulthood. Here are some tips that parents can follow at home to tackle obesity and unhealthy habits in children:

  • Encourage healthy eating habits right from the begining.
  • Try making the dishes healthier. Few changes can make the snacks healthier.
  • Avoid tempting children with calorie-rich food. Treat them but in moderation and by limiting high-fat and high-sugar or salty snacks.
  • Make kids understand the importance of being physically active.
  • Indulge yourself in at least 60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity every day and set an example for your kids
  • Reduce sedentary time. While reading is a good option, too much of screen time is not good.
  • Replace screen time with outdoor fun activities to keep children engaged.

Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Do not eat white refined carbohydrates.
  • Eat less at a time.
  • Work out at least 30 minutes a day.
  • Eat plenty of green bitter vegetables
  • Eat a high fiber diet.
  • Do not eat trans fats in food.

Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

  • Do not eat white refined carbohydrates.
  • Eat less at a time.
  • Work out at least 30 minutes a day.
  • Eat plenty of green bitter vegetables
  • Eat a high fiber diet.
  • Do not eat trans fats in food.

Some tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Exercise more Exercise has various benefits including preventing weight gain, controlling blood sugar levels, and other conditions. A minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity every day is very beneficial.
  • Eat healthy A diet rich in whole grain, fruits, and vegetables is very good for the body. Fibrous food will ensure that you feel fuller for a longer period and prevent any cravings. Avoid processed and refined food as much as possible.
  • Limit your alcohol intake and quit smoking Too much alcohol leads to weight gain and can increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should limit drinks to two per day and women to one per day. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers and therefore, it is a good idea to quit this habit.
  • Understand your risk factors Doing so can help you in taking preventive measures at the earliest and avoid complications.

Do not replace saturated fat with refined carbohydrates

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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It is wrong to say eat less fat; the real message should be eat more fresh fruits and vegetables.

While advocating low-fat diets, it is easier for patients to understand the advice given in terms of foods, e.g., “Eat more fresh fruit” rather than nutrients, or “Reduce your intake of fat to less than 30% of your total energy intake.”

The message to reduce fat has been translated by food manufacturers and consumers into a potentially harmful set of food choices.

Instead of replacing high-fat foods with naturally low-fat foods with other benefits, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grain foods, consumers have often increased their consumption of low-fat or “fat-free” varieties of naturally high-fat foods, such as fat-free snack or junk foods.

The result is an increase in refined carbohydrates which lowers good HDL cholesterol concentrations with a possible increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Is caffeine good for health?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world.
  • It is consumed in the form of coffee and tea.
  • At present there is no scientific data for promoting or discouraging coffee and/or tea consumption in the daily diet.
  • Short-term benefits include mental alertness and improved athletic performance.
  • Short-term adverse effects include headache, anxiety, tremors and insomnia.
  • Long-term adverse effects include generalized anxiety disorder and substance abuse disorders.
  • Long-term benefits are dose-dependent. Caffeine is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, and gout. Coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, is also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • Heavy coffee intake may trigger coronary and arrhythmic events in susceptible individuals, although coffee intake is not considered a long-term risk factor for myocardial disease.
  • Most studies show a modest inverse relationship between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality.
  • Caffeine withdrawal is a well-documented clinical syndrome with headache being the most common symptom. (Source: Uptodate)

type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world.
  • It is consumed in the form of coffee and tea.
  • At present there is no scientific data for promoting or discouraging coffee and/or tea consumption in the daily diet.
  • Short-term benefits include mental alertness and improved athletic performance.
  • Short-term adverse effects include headache, anxiety, tremors and insomnia.
  • Long-term adverse effects include generalized anxiety disorder and substance abuse disorders.
  • Long-term benefits are dose-dependent. Caffeine is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, and gout. Coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, is also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • Heavy coffee intake may trigger coronary and arrhythmic events in susceptible individuals, although coffee intake is not considered a long-term risk factor for myocardial disease.
  • Most studies show a modest inverse relationship between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality.
  • Caffeine withdrawal is a well-documented clinical syndrome with headache being the most common symptom. (Source: Uptodate)

All about Diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications
  • People with diabetes are nearly two times more likely than people without diabetes to die from heart disease, and are also at greater risk for kidney, eye and nerve diseases, among other painful and costly complications. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented, and both types 1 and 2 diabetes can be managed to prevent complications.
  • In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make insulin. In type 2 diabetes the body makes insufficient insulin or does not use insulin well.
  • Gestational diabetes occurs in some women during pregnancy. Though it usually goes away after the birth, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes later in life.
  • Type 2 diabetes has begun to affect young people.
  • Losing a modest amount of weight — about 15 pounds — through diet and exercise can actually reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes by as much as 58 percent in people at high risk.
  • In type 1 diabetes, tight control of blood sugar can prevent diabetes complications.
  • Choose healthy foods to share.
  • Take a brisk walk every day.
  • Talk with your family about your health and your family’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.
  • If you smoke, seek help to quit.
  • Make changes to reduce your risk for diabetes and its complications — for yourself, your families and for future generations.

Low-heat cooking may reduce insulin resistance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Traditional Ayurveda cooking recommends low heat cooking and now a western study endorses it.

Low–temperature cooking reduces insulin resistance among overweight women as per a 4–week study published in the journal Diabetes Care by Alicja B. Mark, PhD, from the department of nutrition, exercise and sports, faculty of science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

Cooking at high temperature such as with baking, roasting and frying — induces formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with inflammation and believed to impair glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes. Common high–AGE foods include bakery products, cooked meat and roasted coffee.

In the study patients randomized to a high–AGE diet were instructed to fry, bake, roast, or grill their food, eat bread with the crust and choose other high–AGE foods from a list. The low–AGE group was told to boil or steam their food, eat bread without the crust, and choose lower–AGE foods from a list. They were also randomized to supplements of either fructose or glucose.

At 4 weeks, no effect was seen from the fructose or glucose on insulin resistance, as assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA–IR) and the calculated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) or on any secondary measures. But the AGE content of the diet did make a difference. Weight, BMI, and waist circumference all decreased in both the high– and low–AGE groups, but to a greater degree among those in the low–AGE group compared with the high–AGE group. Overall, the low–AGE group consumed about 15% more protein, 10% more carbohydrates, and 22% less fat than did the high–AGE group

Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

  • Do not eat white refined carbohydrates.
  • Eat less at a time.
  • Work out at least 30 minutes a day.
  • Eat plenty of green bitter vegetables
  • Eat a high fiber diet.
  • Do not eat trans fats in food.

Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

  1. Do not eat white refined carbohydrates.
  2. Eat less at a time.
  3. Work out at least 30 minutes a day.
  4. Eat plenty of green bitter vegetables
  5. Eat a high fiber diet.
  6. Do not eat trans fats in food.

Low heat cooking may reduce insulin resistance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Low heat cooking may reduce insulin resistance

Traditional Ayurveda cooking recommends low heat cooking and now a western study endorses it.

Low–temperature cooking reduces insulin resistance among overweight women as per a 4–week study published in the journal Diabetes Care by Alicja B. Mark, PhD, from the department of nutrition, exercise and sports, faculty of science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

Cooking at high temperature such as with baking, roasting and frying — induces formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with inflammation and believed to impair glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes. Common high–AGE foods include bakery products, cooked meat and roasted coffee.

In the study patients randomized to a high–AGE diet were instructed to fry, bake, roast, or grill their food, eat bread with the crust and choose other high–AGE foods from a list. The low–AGE group was told to boil or steam their food, eat bread without the crust, and choose lower–AGE foods from a list. They were also randomized to supplements of either fructose or glucose.

At 4 weeks, no effect was seen from the fructose or glucose on insulin resistance, as assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA–IR) and the calculated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) or on any secondary measures. But the AGE content of the diet did make a difference. Weight, BMI, and waist circumference all decreased in both the high– and low–AGE groups, but to a greater degree among those in the low–AGE group compared with the high–AGE group. Overall, the low–AGE group consumed about 15% more protein, 10% more carbohydrates, and 22% less fat than did the high–AGE group

Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , | | Comments Off on Tips to prevent type 2 diabetes

  1. Exercise more Exercise has various benefits including preventing weight gain, controlling blood sugar levels, and other conditions. A minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity every day is very beneficial.
  2. Eat healthy A diet rich in whole grain, fruits, and vegetables is very good for the body. Fibrous food will ensure that you feel fuller for a longer period and prevent any cravings. Avoid processed and refined food as much as possible.
  3. Limit your alcohol intake and quit smoking Too much alcohol leads to weight gain and can increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should limit drinks to two per day and women to one per day. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers and therefore, it is a good idea to quit this habit.
  4. Understand your risk factors Doing so can help you in taking preventive measures at the earliest and avoid complications.

Tips to manage Type 2 diabetes in young adults.

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Maintain a healthy weight by exercising every day and consuming a healthy diet.
  2. Get your blood glucose levels monitored at regular intervals.
  3. Do not consume refined sugar in any form as this can get absorbed into the blood stream more easily and cause further complications.
  4. Reduce stress through activities such as meditation and yoga.

Is caffeine good for the health?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Is caffeine good for the health?

Caffeine is the most consumed stimulant in the world. It is consumed in the form of coffee and tea. At present there is no scientific data for promoting or discouraging coffee and or tea consumption in the daily diet. Short term benefits include mental alertness and improved athletic performance. Short term adverse effects including headache anxiety tremors and insomnia. Long term adverse effects include generalized anxiety disorder and substance abuse disorders. Long term benefits are dose dependent. Caffeine is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson s disease Alzheimer s disease alcoholic cirrhosis and gout. Coffee both caffeinated and decaffeinated is also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Heavy coffee intake may trigger coronary and arrhythmic events in susceptible individuals although coffee intake is not considered a long term risk factor for myocardial disease. Most studies show a modest inverse relationship between coffee consumption and all cause mortality. Caffeine withdrawal is a well documented clinical syndrome with headache being the most common symptom. Source Uptodate