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Dr K K Aggarwal

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the end of winter and Makar sankranti as the first day of summer.

 

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun change its direction north wards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

 

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhisham Pitamah in Mahbharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

 

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

 

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

 

As per the “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

 

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Darkness cannot be removed physically; it can only be removed by switching on the light or going into sunlight or lighting a fire. Similarly, negative thoughts are absence of positive thoughts.

In Bhagavad Gita, it has been said that in the period of Uttarayana with longer days, the first half at full moon, in the presence of light or agni, more positive thoughts are acquired compared to in Dakshinayana, before Amavasya or no moon or in absence of light.

Bhagavad Gita also says that whatever you think the whole life, you think at the time of death and if the time at the time of death you have positive thoughts, you are likely to get Moksha. That may be the reason why in Hindu mythology it is said that just before the death, we should light a diya or chant in front of agni (fire) so that dying person’s thoughts become positive.

In computer language, it is explained that when you open a file repeatedly, it becomes a priority file and appears in the search engine on priority as compared to other files.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are entirely my own.

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the end of winter and Makar Sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction north wards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per the “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry into the ‘Makar Rashi’. The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the last day of winter and maker sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction north words on the day of makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards). It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi (Dhanur), which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly. Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to leave his body. Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas”, Dakshinayana (the other six month period) is the night of the deities where as Uttarayana is their day. It’s the time to start a dip in Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

How to convert Dakshinayana into Uttarayana at the time of death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Bhagavad Gita whatever your thoughts are through life will be your thoughts at the time of your death and whatever thoughts are there at the time of your death will be your thoughts in your future birth.

Bhagavad Gita says that the best time to die is Uttarayana, before full moon, in day time or in the presence of Yagna. Does it mean that the people who die in Dakshinayana or 15 days before Amavasya or during night will suffer and will not get liberation or they will go to the hell?

No. If this would have the intention, Bhagavad Gita would not have mentioned it at all as this would have created unrest in 50% of the society.

What they probably meant was that everybody at the time of death should be in a positive frame of mind. If they are not, efforts should be made to create positive frame of mind for them which means that if a person is dying in night or 15 days before Amavasya, one can create an atmosphere of Uttarayana or full moon by creating enough artificial light as if it is day time or doing Yagna in the vicinity of the dying person and/or enchanting of any religious Mantra, for example, Gayatri Mantra in the ear of the dying person.

Efforts should also be made to talk positive in his or her presence. Ayurvedic or Homeopathic consultants can be contacted if they have any medicine which can convert negative state of mind into positive state of mind.

In the process of death a dying person can hear till his last karma indriyas and gnana indriyas are functioning.

In Hindu mythology, chanting of Rama or Aum at the time of death does the same thing.

How to convert Dakshinayana into Uttarayana at the time of death?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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As per Bhagavad Gita whatever your thoughts are through life will be your thoughts at the time of your death and whatever your thoughts at the time of your death will be your thoughts in your future birth.

Bhagavad Gita says that the best time to die is Uttarayana, before full moon, in day time or in the presence of Yagna. Does that mean the people who die in Dakshinayana or 15 days before Amavasya or during night will suffer and will not get liberation or they will go to the hell?

No. If this would have the intention, Bhagavad Gita would not have mentioned it at all as this would have created unrest in 50% of the society.

Makar Sankranti: Uttarayana: The Medical Importance

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry into the ‘Makar Rashi’. The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember Lohri as the last day of winter and Makar Sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti means “change of direction” and the sun changes its direction northwards on the day of Makar Sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards). It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly. Bhishma Pitamah in Mahabharata also waited for this period (not day) to leave his body.

Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas”, Dakshinayana (the other 6-month period) is the night of the deities whereas Uttarayana is their day.

It’s the time to take a dip in the Ganges at sunrise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

Winter is the Month of depression and Uttarayana Start of an Optimistic Form of Mind

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In Indian mythology, the word “Sankranti” relates to any transformation or change. Makar Sankranti, which falls on 14th of January, one day after Lohri, indicates change in the direction of the sun, as it starts moving north resulting into longer days and shorter nights. In Hindu mythology, it is called Uttarayana. This was the period during Mahabharat when Bhishma Pitamah waited for his death.

The Uttarayana and Dakshinayana are not only time periods mentioned in the Vedic literature but also the state of minds. Uttarayana means a period for a positive state of mind and Dakshinayana a period for relatively negative state of mind. A positive state of mind in Uttarayana makes meditation easier in this period and more fruitful. Beginners should learn the process of meditation and pranayama during this period.

Bhagwad Gita talks about Moksha and liberation. Those who believe in the philosophy of rebirth know that once a soul is liberated at death, a person is not reborn. For others who believe that hell and heaven are in this birth only, liberation means dying peacefully and without sufferings.

The theory of rebirth is well described in Bhagwad Gita in Chapter 8. The gist of Lord Krishna’s teaching is:

1. Whatever you think throughout your life will be your thought at the time of death.
2. Whatever is the state of mind at the time of death will be the atmosphere you will get in the rebirth. For example if your state of mind is in cruelty at the time of death, you will be born in a cruel family.
3. If you are relaxed, thinking of God or chanting AUM at the time of death, there are chances your soul will be liberated.
4. Fire, illumination, daytime, fortnight before full moon and Uttarayana are the paths for liberation. It means these are the periods/ways for spontaneous positive thinking.

From mental health point of view, this knowledge can be converted into medical prescription. Uttarayana means satwik healthy state of mind and dakshinayana means a depressed state of mind. Performing and attending to Yagna, sitting in well–illuminated light or exposing oneself to sunlight during the day can be an adjunct to depression treatment. During the first fortnight of full moon and during Uttarayana, psychotherapy and counseling invariably will work better and the requirement of drugs may get reduced.

Uttarayana is also the period for ‘Snana’ (bath); ‘Daan’ (charity); ‘Dhyana’ (concentration), ‘Upwas’ (detoxification) and ‘Sun worship’ (Sunbath).

Snana means cleansing of the body, mind and the soul and combined with fast or ‘upwas’ and sun bath is the procedure for detoxification. Once the body is detoxified, it’s in a positive state of mind, can concentrate better and gets detached to material things. One should also start donating in charity whatever one has in excess.

Uttarayana can also be described in chakra language. From mooladhara chakra to anahata chakra is the Dakshinayana path and from anahata chakra to ajna chakra is the Uttarayana path. Those who travel on the Uttarayana path travel from anahata chakra. Those who travel on the Dakshinayana path start from mooladhara.

Science Behind Holasthak

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In the year 2013, the time between 19th March 2013 to 27th March 2013 is celebrated as the festival of Holashtak. It is name used to refer to the eight days prior to Holi festival and is considered inauspicious in mythology.

In North India, Holashtak begins on the Phalgun Shukla Ashtami (eighth day during the waxing phase of moon in Falgun month) and ends on the Phalgun Purnima day (full moon day). The Purnima day is observed as Holika Dahan.

It is considered inauspicious to perform auspicious ceremonies during the period like marriage, housewarming or any of the sanskars. People also avoid starting of new business etc. The day is considered ideal for performing Dhaan – alms giving.

The difference between Holi and Diwali is that holi is observed in Uttarayana (the period with positive state of mind) and Diwali in Dakshinayana (the period with negative state of mind).

In Holi we try making up with our enemies and in Diwali we only redefine our existing friendship.

Holi means burning negativity in our mind and in the mind of our enemies. This can only happen in a period of positive state of mind (first six months of the year). The process of removing negativity requires multiple attempts. As per mythology it requires eight days (or eight attempts) to remove the negative attitude of a person and hence the word Holasthak.

During the period one is trying to wash out the negativity, it is best to avoid calling people for community functions as in that case you will need to call the one with whom you are trying to patch up and the same may not be in sound frame of mind with you and you may end up with an uncomfortable situation.

Yesterday: What a great combination

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Sunday (sun)
Full moon (Moon)
Purnima (salt and water retention, salt restricted diet, high tides)
Dry winter (more alpha activity, more upper blood pressure, more pulse rate)
Uttarayana (positive state of mind)
Magh month ( time for vitamin D, increased fertility, marriages, eat sesame, sunbath)
Kalpwas month (disciplined one month)
Allahabad sangam (incubation period, away from routine stress, self confession).

This Sunday came after 148 years.

 

An extremely auspicious day, Lohri marks the sun’s entry in to the ‘Makar Rashi’.  The next day after lohri is Makar Sankranti. One can remember lohri as the last day of winter and maker sankranti as the first day of summer.

The word Sankranti menas “change of direction” and the sun change its direction north words on the day of maker sankranti.

The period, beginning from 14 January (Makar Sankranti) lasting till 14 July, is known as Uttarayana (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards).  It is also the last day of the month of Maargazhi, which is the ninth month of the lunar calendar. The Bhagawad Gita deems it as an extremely sacred and auspicious time when Lord Krishna manifests himself most tangibly.  Bhisham Pitamah in Mahbharata also waited for this period (not day) to relieve his body.  Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the Ayanas.”

In chapter 8 shloka 24 Lord Krishna has said “Those who know the Supreme Brahman attain that Supreme by passing away from the world during the influence of the fiery god, in the light, at an auspicious moment of the day, during the fortnight of the waxing moon, or during the six months when the sun travels in the north.”

The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year (peak winter), Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh.

As per “Puranas” Dakshinayana (The other six months period) is the night of the deities where as Uttarayana is their day.  It’s the time to start a dip in Ganges at sun rise and at sunset and say good bye to winter foods.

Winter Is the Month of depression and Uttarayana Start of Optimistic Form of Mind

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In Indian mythology, the word “Sankranti” relates to any transformation or change. Makar Sankranti which fell on 14th of January, one day after the Lohri, indicates change in the direction of the sun, as it starts moving north resulting into longer days and shorter nights.  In Hindu mythology, it is called uttarayana. This was the period during Mahabharat when Bhishma Pitamah waited for his death.

The uttarayana and dakshinayana are not only time periods mentioned in the Vedic literature but also the state of minds. Uttarayana means a period for a positive state of mind and Dakshinayana a period for relatively negative state of mind. A positive state of mind in Uttarayana makes meditation easier in this period and more fruitful.  Beginner should learn the process of meditation and pranayama during this period.

Bhagwad Geeta talks about Moksha and liberation. Those who believe in the philosophy of rebirth know that once a soul is liberated at death, a person is not reborn.  For others who believe that hell and heaven are in this birth only, liberation means dying peacefully and without sufferings.

The theory of rebirth is well described in Bhagwad Geeta in Chapter 8. The gist of Lord Krishna’s teaching is:

1. Whatever you think throughout your life will be your thought at the time of death.

2. Whatever is the state of mind at the time of death will be the atmosphere you will get in the rebirth. For example if your state of mind is in cruelty at the time of death, you will be born in a cruel family.

3. If you are relaxed, thinking of God or Chanting AUM at the time of death, there are chances your soul will be liberated.

4. Fire, illumination, daytime, fortnight before the full moon and Uttarayana are the paths for liberation. It means these are the periods / ways for spontaneous positive thinking.

From mental health point of view, this knowledge can be converted into medical prescription.  Uttarayana means satwic healthy state of mind and dakshinayana means a depressed state of mind. Performing and attending to Yagna, sitting in well illuminated light or exposing oneself to the day sunlight can be an adjunct to depression treatment. During the first fortnight of full moon and during uttarayana, the psychotherapy and counseling invariable will work better and the requirement of drugs may get reduced.

Uttarayana is also the period for ‘Snana’ (bath); ‘Daan’ (charity); ‘Dhayana’ (concentration), ‘Upvas’ (detoxification) and ‘Sun worship’ (Sunbath).

Snana means cleansing of the body, mind and the soul and combined with fast or ‘ upvas’ and sun  bath is the procedure for detoxification. Once the body is detoxified it’s in a positive state of mind, can concentrate better and gets detached to material things. One should also start donating in charity whatever one has in excess.

Uttarayana can also be described in chakra language. From mooladhara chakra to anahata chakra is the dakshinayana path and from anahata chakra to ajna chakra is the uttarayana path.  Those who travel on the uttarayana path travel from anahata chakra. Those who travel on the dakshinayana path start from mooladhara.

Lohri: Adieu To Winters: “Til Tadake; Din Jhatake”

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Means ‘Good bye to Til or Sesame’, (which is used excessively in winters) and ‘welcome to longer days’ (which signify the dawn of summer).

Lohri, the festival of bonfire falls on 13th January. The earth, farthest from the sun at this point of time, starts its journey towards the sun, thus ending the coldest month of the year, Paush, and announcing the start of the month of Magh and the auspicious period of Uttarayan – January 14 to July 14 (“Uttar” North and “ayan” movement towards). Uttarayana is considered to be the holiest half of the year. In Bhagavad Gita, the Lord says, “I am Uttarayana among the ayanas.”

Unlike other Indian festivals, Lohri reflects less of religion than culture. It is more a heritage of the agrarian Indian society than a felicitation of some Indian God.

Lohri is also the time to say good bye to winter foods. The lohri ritual starts at sunset when people circle around (parikrama) the bonfire and throw puffed rice, popcorn and other munchies into the fire, shouting “Aadar aye dilather jaye” (May honor come and poverty vanish!). This slogan coincides with the start of the harvesting season inNorth India.

After the parikrama, people exchange greetings and gifts, and distribute prasad comprising of five items: til, gajak, jaggery, peanuts, and popcorn followed by the traditional dinner of makki-ki-roti (multi-millet hand-rolled bread) and sarson-ka-saag (cooked mustard leaves). Eating of til (sesame of seeds) and rorhi (jaggery) is considered to be essential on this day.

Lohri therefore is the last day of eating heat producing winter foods. This is what the ritual of throwing these items in the bonfire is. It also signifies that from the day of lohri these items are for worship and to be taken in small amount like a prasadam and not as major part of the meals.

The bonfire or the artificial source of heat, to many, is embarked with festivity and supposedly the last need for heat for the season after which the warmth would come from the sun most naturally.

As per Ayurveda the six months of Uttarayana( Adana –Dry Season) consists of Shishira, Vasanta and  Grishma periods (Late winter, spring, summer). Bitter, pungent and astringent tastes are dominant in the soil. During the late winter chances of asthmatic attacks, vata imbalance, dryness of the body etc. are more.  Maximum chances of vata emergencies liken heart attacks and stroke occur during full moon in this period.

The Daksinayana (6 months, Visarga – Wet Season) consists of Varsha, Sharad, Hemanta (Rainy, autumn, early winter). Sweet, sour, salt tastes are dominant in the soil.

Early (Wet) vs late (Dry) winter

Winter therefore can be divided into wet and dry winter. Wet winter is characterized by fall in temperature along with high humidity. Environmentally, we see fog and smog during this season. Dry or late winter on the other hand is characterized by absence of fog, smog and presence of chilly airy winds.

Most hypothermia illnesses occur in dry late winter. The transition phase between wet and dry winter is on Lohri. In terms of Ayurveda, it means shifting from Kapha to Vata atmosphere. The onset of dry winter is also the time for accelerated movement disorders in the body. Accelerated hypertension, arrhythmias, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT), brain hemorrhage, heart attack etc. all occur at the start of dry late winter.

Unpublished compilation of data has also shown that maximum temporary pacemakers are also put during this season.

The correct lifestyle in this season has been defined in Ayurveda and it involves reducing consumption of stringent, bitter and pungent foods.

 

Why Hindu Marriages Are Held In Night?

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Originally, Hindu marriages were always held in daytime. As per Vedic knowledge and Bhagavad Gita, auspicious time is in Uttarayana, before full moon, in daytime and near agni and light. Medically, you are more mentally positive during this period. Marriage were shifted in the night only during a particular era a few hundred year back when kings of that era were ruthless and used to pickup young good looking women to spend night with them. To escape from them, people started getting their doctors married in night time so that their daughter is not divulged to the king’s soldier.