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Dr K K Aggarwal

You are born with a quota, use it judicially

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Everyone is born with a passport with a defined battery life to live up to 100 years after which one has to go back to renew or recharge the batteries.

If the battery is overused or misused and is depleted early, one may have to go back prematurely for recharging, but this time when one comes back, he or she may come back with a different body which may not be the human one. There are 64 lakh Yonis as described in the Vedic Literature.

According to the Vedic description if one dies prematurely there are chances that the rebirth will not be in the same species.

To live up to the time period defined at the time of birth by Dharmaraja one has to follow the principles as described in Yogashastra.

The main principle is the principle of moderation and variety. It says that everything has to be used, if not used will get rusted and if overused will undergo wear and tear.

When using the principles of moderation and variety, it is important to remember that each one of us is born with a fixed quota of everything, a quota of diet, respiration, heart rate and thoughts.

According to swara yoga, one is born with predefined number of respirations to be taken during life. If one consumes them early he will depart for refueling early from the life. To reduce respiratory rate is therefore the basis of postponing aging and prolonging life. Stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system by learning and practicing pranayama, which is slow and deep breathing, does the same.

One breathes 15 times a minute or 21600 breaths in a day, or 7884000 (78.84 lakh) a year or 788400000 (78.84 crores) during life (assuming it to be 100 years). Some yoga books say that a person is born with 33 crore breaths, the same if taken at the rate or 15 per minute would last for 42 years.

In fact Pranayama originated on the concept that the breaths of each one of us are numbered, that our life-span is dependent on how many times we shall breathe in a given life, and that, as a consequence of this fact, we must reduce the number of breaths so as to live longer.

In Gorakshapaddhati (I.93), it is written that “Due to fear of death even Brahma, the Lord of creation, keeps on practicing pranayama, and so do many yogis and munis. It is recommended that a student of yoga must always control his breath.”

Hathayoga-pradipika (II.39) also writes: `All the Gods including Lord Brahma became devoted to the practice of pranayama because they were afraid of death. We the mortals should follow the same path and control the breath.”

Similarly one is born with a quota of heartbeats with an average of 70 per minute. Many studies have shown that people who have a higher resting heart rate have more chances of sudden death. The aim therefore is to keep their heart rate slow. This can be achieved either by regular exercise, meditation, AUM Pranayama, or by meditation. In people who run marathons or participate in other athletic activities, the temporary increase in the heart rate during exercise is compensated by the body by adapting the cardiovascular system in such a way that the basal heart rate reduces. The marathon runners may have a heart rate of only 50 per minute.

The less one eats the more he lives is an Yogic saying, It is said that people who eat once a day are Yogis, twice a day are Bhogis and thrice a day are Rogis. There are enough studies now, which say that 25% reduction in the calories content can increase the life span. Many studies in rodents have also shown the same effect.

The moderation in exercise is to walk 10000 steps a day. No exercise will end up with obesity and over use with osteoarthritis.

Stress is the excess of thoughts in the mind. Controlling the mind forms the basis of meditation. Samadhi is the state of no thoughts. Practicing meditation 20 minutes twice daily helps to restrain the mind with resultant state of Turiya where the mind has controlled limited positive thoughts.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The very purpose of life is to face sufferings

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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According to Hinduism, the very fact we are born means that in our last life, we did not get liberation or Moksha. It also means that some sufferings in our last birth still remained. Therefore, the purpose of this birth is to face those sufferings.

When the purpose of our life is to face sufferings, why suffer from them? This should be considered as ‘sukh’ and not ‘dukh’. As per Vedic literature, every diversity is an opportunity to learn or to do something different. The four notable principles of Buddhism also talk about the same. The first is that suffering exists, second that there is a reason for every suffering and third that it is possible to neutralize the suffering by understanding the 8 paths of cessation of suffering. Also remember that in every ‘dukh’ you think of ‘sukh’ and in every ‘sukh’ you think of a ‘dukh’. Next time you have a problem, think differently and learn to enjoy them.

(Disclaimer: The views expressed in this write up are my own).

The very purpose of life is to face sufferings

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on The very purpose of life is to face sufferings

According to Hinduism, the very fact we are born means that in our last life, we did not get liberation or Moksha. It also means that some sufferings in our last birth still remained. Therefore, the purpose of this birth is to face those sufferings.

When the purpose of our life is to face sufferings, then why suffer from them?

This should be considered as ‘sukh’ and not ‘dukh’. As per Vedic literature, every diversity is an opportunity to learn or to do something different. The four notable principles of Buddha also talk about the same. The first is that suffering exists, second that there is a reason for every suffering and third that it is possible to neutralize the suffering by understanding the 8 paths of cessation of suffering.

Also remember that in every ‘dukh’ you think of ‘sukh’ and in every ‘sukh’ you think of a ‘dukh’. Next time you have a problem, think differently and learn to enjoy them.

One of my industrialist friends was once ordered to go to Tihar Jail on Friday night. He tried his level best and wanted to get admitted in the hospital for the weekend so that he could get bail on Monday morning. I told him that whether he was in jail or in hospital, it would make no difference as far as his status was concerned. In both the situations, he would be listed as being in the jail on paper. So I told him to go to the jail and enjoy those 48 hours as a holiday. When he came back from the jail, he was a different person and learnt the principle of life which he otherwise could not have learnt.

Collective Consciousness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Consciousness is an energized field of information with powers to do everything in the universe. Collective consciousness is the internet of the collective souls of many people in a group.

Collective consciousness is the strongest super power ever available in the universe. As per the Vedic texts, whatever is the intent of collective consciousness will become a reality. Scientifically, collective consciousness is based on the principle of critical mass. Vedic literature has shown it to be 1% of the defined population under study.
The origin of the critical mass comes from 100th monkey phenomenon. The story goes as under: long ago in Japan a monkey called Emo used to eat dirty apples picked up from the ground everyday. One day by accident the apple fell down in a river, the dirt got washed off and he ate the washed apple. Obviously it tasted delicious. He started washing the apples thereafter every day before eating. His fellow monkeys started following the same. The process of following went on. A time came when the 100th monkey washed the apple and ate it. A strange phenomenon was noticed. All monkeys in and around that state started washing the apple before eating. The no. 100 was the critical mass.

Once this mass is crossed the information will spread like a wild fire and the intent becomes a universal reality. Vedic literature has also shown if 1% of the public of any area meditates together, the crime rate of that area goes down. It also talks about the role of critical mass in prayers in achieving miracles.

Thus principle of critical mass is often used in designing and organizing an event. In a movie hall of 1000 people if 10 people clap sitting in different areas everybody will clap. The same is true for hooting at a particular scene. Most politicians use this principle when they organize election rallies. For a gathering of 10000 they need 100 and for a gathering of 1000 people they only need 10 supporters who are supposed to sit in different areas and shout or clap on given directions. The Mexican way of hooting or clapping in cricket grounds also follows the same principle. For a ground like Eden Gardens with a capacity of 75,000 people you only require 750 people to control the mood of the people. Most successful leaders used this technology to lead.

Collective Consciousness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on Collective Consciousness

Consciousness is an energized field of information with powers to do everything in the universe. Collective consciousness is the internet of the collective souls of many people in a group.

Collective consciousness is the strongest superpower ever available in the universe. As per the Vedic texts, whatever is the intent of collective consciousness will become a reality. Scientifically collective consciousness is based on the principle of critical mass. The Vedic literature has shown it to be the 1% of the defined population under study.

The origin of the critical mass comes from 100th monkey phenomenon. The story goes as under: Long ago in Japan a monkey called Emo used to eat dirty apples everyday picked up from the ground. One day by accident the apple fell down in a river, the dirt got washed off and he ate the washed apple. Obviously it tasted delicious. The monkey started washing the apple thereafter every day before eating. His fellow monkey started following the same. The process of following went on. A time came when the 100th monkey washed the apple and ate. A strange phenomenon was noticed. All monkeys in and around that state started washing the apple before eating. The number 100 was the critical mass.

Once this mass is crossed, information spreads like wild fire and the intent becomes a universal reality. Vedic literature has also shown that if 1% of the public of any area meditates together the crime rate of that area goes down. It also talks about the role of critical mass in prayers in achieving miracles.

The principle of critical mass is often used in designing and organizing an event. In a movie hall of 1000 people if 10 people sitting in different areas clap, then everybody will clap. The same applies to hooting. For a gathering of 10000, 100 are needed and for a gathering of 1000 people, 10 supporters are required, who are supposed to sit in different areas and shout or clap on given directions. The Mexican way of hooting or clapping in cricket grounds also follow the same principle. Most successful leaders used this technology to lead.


Collective Consciousness

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , | | Comments Off on Collective Consciousness

Consciousness is an energized field of information with powers to do everything in the universe. Collective consciousness is the internet of the collective souls of many people in a group. Collective consciousness is the strongest super power ever available in the universe. As per the Vedic texts whatever is the intent of collective consciousness will become a reality. Scientifically collective consciousness is based on the principle of critical mass. The Vedic literature has shown it to be the 1% of the defined population under study.

The origin of the critical mass comes from 100th monkey phenomenon. The story goes as under: long ago in Japan a monkey called Emo used to eat dirty apples everyday picked up from the ground. One day by accident the apple fell down in a river, the dirt got washed off and he ate the washed apple. Obviously it tasted delicious. The monkey started washing the apple thereafter everyday before eating. His fellow monkey started following the same. The process of following went on. A time came when the 100th monkey washed the apple and ate, a strange phenomenon was noticed. All monkeys in and around that state started washing the apple before eating. The number 100 was the critical mass.

Once this mass is crossed the information will spread like a wild fire and the intent becomes a universal reality. Vedic literature has also shown if 1% of the public of any area meditates together the crime rate of that area goes down. It also talks about the role of critical mass in prayers in achieving miracles.

The principle of critical mass is often used in designing and organizing an event. In a movie hall of 1000 people, if 10 people sitting in different areas start clapping everybody will clap. The same is true for the hooting at a particular scene. Most politicians use this principle when they organize election rallies. For a gathering of 10000 they need 100 and for a gathering of 1000 people they only need 10 supporters who will sit in different areas and shout or clap on given directions. Mexican way of hooting or clapping in stadiums also follows the same principle. Most successful leaders used this technology to lead.

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)
  2. Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cowdung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).
  3. Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.
  4. Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  5. Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colours – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fibre burnt for the dark colour, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betal and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees– jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)
  2. Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cowdung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).
  3. Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.
  4. Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  5. Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colours – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fibre burnt for the dark colour, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betal and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees– jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)
  • Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cowdung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).
  • Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.
  • Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  • Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colors – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fiber burnt for the dark colour, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betel and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees – jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  • Panchamrit: A mixture of Honey, Milk, Curd, Ghee and Brown Sugar.

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  • Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)
  • Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cowdung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).
  • Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.
  • Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  • Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colors – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fiber burnt for the dark colour, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betel and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees – jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
  • Panchamrit: A mixture of Honey, Milk, Curd, Ghee and Brown Sugar.

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)

Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cowdung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).

Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.

Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).

Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colours – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fibre burnt for the dark colour, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betal and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees – jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).

Panchamrit: A mixture of Honey, Milk, Curd, Ghee and Brown Sugar.

What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Spirituality - Science Behind Rituals | Tagged With: , , | | Comments Off on What are Satvik offerings in Vedic literature?

Food Offerings: Panchashasha (grains of five types – brown rice, mung or whole green gram, til or sesame, mashkalai (white urad dal) or any variety of whole black leguminous seed, jowar or millet)
Panchagobbo (Five items obtained from cow: milk, ghee or clarified butter, curd, cow dung and gomutra), curd, honey, brown sugar, three big noibiddos, one small noibiddo, three bowls of madhupakka (a mixture of honey, curd, ghee and brown sugar for oblation), bhoger drobbadi (items for the feast), aaratir drobbadi mahasnan oil, dantokashtho, sugar cane juice, an earthen bowl of atop (a type of rice), til oil (sesame oil).
Water offerings: Ushnodok (lukewarm water), coconut water, sarbooushodhi, mahaoushodhi, water from oceans, rain water, spring water, water containing lotus pollen.
Three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
Puja Items: Sindur (vermillion), panchabarner guri (powders of five different colors – turmeric, rice, kusum flowers or red abir, rice chaff or coconut fiber burnt for the dark color, bel patra or powdered wood apple leaves), panchapallab (leaves of five trees – mango, pakur or a species of fig, banyan, betel and Joggodumur or fig), pancharatna (five types of gems – gold, diamond, sapphire, ruby and pearl), panchakoshay (bark of five trees – jaam, shimul, berela, kool, bokul powdered in equal portions and mixed with water), green coconut with stalk, three aashonanguriuk (finger ring made of kusha).
Panchamrit: A mixture of Honey, Milk, Curd, Ghee and Brown Sugar.

Dakshinayana is the start of negative state of mind

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The uttarayana and dakshinayana are not only time periods mentioned in the Vedic literature but also the state of minds. Uttarayana means a period for a positive state of mind and Dakshinayana a period for relatively negative state of mind.

Dakshinayana is the southern transit of the Sun. The Uttarayana and Dakshinayana period is calculated differently in South andNorth India

Bhagwad Geeta talks about Moksha and liberation. Those who believe in the philosophy of rebirth know that once a soul is liberated at death, a person is not reborn. Those who believe that hell and heaven are in this birth only for them liberation means dying peacefully and without sufferings.

The theory of rebirth is well described in Bhagwad Geeta in Chapter 8.

The gist of Lord Krishna’s teaching is:
1. Whatever you think throughout your life will be your thought at the time of death.
2. Whatever is the state of mind at the time of death will be the atmosphere you will get in the rebirth. For example if your state of mind is in cruelty at the time of death, you will be born in a cruel family. If you are relaxed, thinking of God or Chanting AUM at the time of death, there are chances your soul will be liberated.
3. Fire, illumination, daytime, fortnight before the full moon and uttarayana are the paths for liberation. It means these are the periods / ways for spontaneous positive thinking. And the reverse is for dakshinayana

From mental health point of view, this knowledge can be converted into medical prescription. Uttarayana means satwa, healthy state of mind and dakshinayana means a depressed negative state of mind. Performing and attending to Yagna, sitting in well illuminated lights or exposing oneself to the day sunlight can be an adjunct to depression treatment. During the first fortnight of full moon and during uttarayana, the psychotherapy and counseling invariable will work better and the requirement of drugs may get reduced. The reverse will happen in dakshinayana.

In chakra language , from mooladhara chakra to anahata chakra is the dakshinayana path and from anahata chakra to ajna chakra is the uttarayana path. Those who travel on the uttarayana path travel from anahata chakra. Those who travel on the dakshinayana path start from mooladhara.

The Chatur Mas or Four holy months in Hinduism falls during the period of Dakshinayana. Chaturmas begins on July 11 and ends on November 6. It begins on the Ekadasi day in Shukla Paksha in the month of Ashada and ends on the Ekadasi in the Shukla Paksha in the month of Kartik. It occurs during monsoon season and most important festivals take place during this period. It’s a four month period for observing fast, rituals, pujas and festivals.

Chaturmas has following months

1st Shravan month is dedicated to Lord Shiva, especially the Mondays. Is a month or Vata or air imbalance. The classical song ” Savan ka mahina Pavan kare shor” explains the air imbalance in this month. The vata function in the mind is related to emmotional imbalance.

2nd Bhadrapad is the month of festivals including the Ganesh Chaturthi and Janmaasthmi. The month is again related to Vata or air imbalance. The classical Bollywood song “tere naina savan bhado phir bhi mera man payasa” explains the state of the mind in savan and bhado months. The state of the mind is negative with chances of more non fulfillment of desires.

3rd Ashwin month include, Durga Puja, Navratri, Diwali etc.

4th Kartik and Diwali celebrations end in this month.

It’s a saying to avoid green leafy vegetables in Shravan month, Curd in Bhadrapad, milk in Ashwin and pulses, the split variety in Kartik month.

No marriages or important functions take place in chaturmas for many reasons

1. Firstly it is a period of negative state of mind and hence more chances of divorce
2. For the same reason more chances of infertility
3. Due to rainy seasons more chances of worms on the surface and infesting the leafy vegetables
4. Due to Vata (movement) predominance, leafy vegetables will not be health friendly
5. Due to pitaa (metabolism) suppression the digestive fire will be weak
6. Many people avoid garlic and onion as it can stimulate unnecessary excitements, cause indigestion and distract devotee from pujas and prayers.

As per Vedic literature “ ātma-mātā guroḥ patnī, brāhmaṇī rāja-patnikā, dhenur dhātrī tathā pṛthvī, saptaitā mātaraḥ smṛtāḥ” theree are seven types of mothers.

1.     Atama mata: the mother who gave me birth

2.     Guroh patni: the wife of my teachers, guru or master

3.     Brahmni: the wife of our Brahmin to whom we call for our religious functions

4.      Raja Patni: Presidents wife

5.     Dhenur : Cow

6.     Dhatri: Anyone who has helped in my growing ( sister, aya, domestic help, grand-mother, nurse, gynecologist)

7.     Prithvi: Mother earth

The possible gifts are

1.     Non materialistic: Appreciation, care, love, affection, time, compliments.

2.     Materialistic gifts.

a.     Vitamin D sachets, once per month, 12 sachets.

b.     One year supply of iron folic acid, weekly one tablet.

c.     One year supply of calcium supplements.

d.     Four tablets of albendazole, to be taken one every three months.

e.     Pneumonia vaccine once five years or once for life if mother above 65.

f.      Flu vaccine once a year.

g.     Typhoid vaccine once in three years.

h.     Round trip for pilgrimage tour.

i.     Sumersupply of Sattu, jiggery, fruits or dry fruits.

j.      Filter for safe water supply.

In cardiac arrest CPR 10 should be started within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better, and should be continued for more than 10 minutes, said Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India, Dr. Aggarwal was conducting CPR 10 camps at Shri Rama Bharti Public School and Bal Bharti Public School at Bahadur Garh.

As per modern science and also ancient Vedic literature, life can be brought back within 48 minutes after the heart has stopped functioning.

The message for public is to start compressing the chest of the deceased victim with a speed of 100 per minute till medical help arrives. Effective and prolonged resuscitation is the key.

Over 2000 school children were trained in CPR Camp.

About HCFI : The only National Not for profit NGO, on whose mega community health education events, Govt. of India has released two National commemorative stamps and one cancellation stamp, and who has conducted one to one training on” Hands only CPR” of 50118 people since 1st November 2012.

The CPR 10 Mantra is – “within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute.”