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Dr K K Aggarwal

Women who eat lot of meat are prone to weight gain

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Women who eat a lot of meat are apt to weigh more than those who do not. Previous studies have consistently shown that vegetarians are lighter and have a lower body mass index than their omnivorous counterparts.

A study from Brigham Young evaluated 284 premenopausal women, an average of 40 years old, who did not smoke. The researchers separated the women into groups classified by low, moderate, and high meat intake per 1,000 calories consumed per day.

Over the 7-day study, the investigators found that the low-intake group ate less than 1.9 three-ounce servings of meat per day, as opposed to more than 3.18 servings for the high-intake group.

More than half (52.8%) of the women classified as having a high meat intake were obese, defined in this study as having greater than 35% body fat. Conversely, 37.3% of women in the moderate meat intake group were obese and only 15.6% of those in the low meat intake group were obese.

This was a cross-sectional study, so the findings do not show that meat causes obesity, while that could be the case; it could also be that obesity caused women to eat more meat – like more obese women following the Atkins diet, which is rich in meat.

There are a number of physiological mechanisms by which meat could fuel weight gain. Meat proteins may elevate insulin levels, and thereby growth factors, that could influence weight and percent body fat. It has also been shown that consumption of saturated fat – most of which comes from animal products – is associated with obesity.

It may be worth recognizing that eating less meat may be beneficial in a weight management program. It is possible to eat a healthy diet that is limited in meat. Alternative protein sources, such as lentils, nuts and legumes, can provide sufficient protein and actually be beneficial in dieting.

Warning signs of worsening heart failure

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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If you have heart failure, call your doctor if you notice any of these signs:

  • Sudden weight gain (2–3 pounds in one day or 5 or more pounds in one week)
  • Extra swelling in the feet or ankles
  • Swelling or pain in the abdomen
  • Shortness of breath not related to exercise
  • Discomfort or trouble breathing when lying flat
  • Waking up feeling short of breath
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Increased fatigue
  • Mental confusion
  • Loss of appetite

Some tips on thyroid disorders from HCFI

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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  1. Hypothyroidism is linked to weight gain. Thus, a person with this condition can find it difficult to lose weight. Consume a diet rich in fibre and low in fat to maintain a healthy weight.
  2. Although it may be difficult to get moving in those with a sluggish thyroid, it is a good idea to push yourself to do some physical activity.
  3. Stress is known to exacerbate thyroid disorders. Do something to reduce those stress levels. It could be yoga, meditation, dance, or anything.
  4. Know the symptoms. Understand what the common symptoms of thyroid cancer are.
  5. Get Tested. Have your GP check for nodules and test TSH levels every few years if you have risk factors for cancer.

Eating fast food can cause liver damage

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Eating at least two fast foods meals every day and restricting levels of physical activity to no more than 5,000 steps a day can lead to signs of liver damage or weight gain as per a Swedish study wherein at the end of the 4 weeks, the fast food eaters had put on an average of 6.5 kilograms (14.3 pounds). After just 1 week on the fast food diet, blood tests showed sharp increases in a liver enzyme called SGPT. SGPT levels were more than quadrupled over the 4-week study period. Increased SGPT levels are used to diagnose liver disease before symptoms develop. In 11 fast food dieters, SGPT rose to levels suggestive of liver damage. The SGPT increases were linked to weight gain and higher sugar and Carbohydrate intake.

Eating fast food can damage the liver

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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Eating at least two fast foods meals every day and restricting levels of physical activity to no more than 5 000 steps a day can lead to signs of liver damage or weight gain as per a Swedish study. At the end of the 4 weeks the fast food eaters had put on an average of 6.5 kilograms 14.3 pounds . After just 1 week on the fast food diet blood tests showed sharp increases in a liver enzyme called SGPT. SGPT levels were more than quadrupled over the 4 week study period. Increased SGPT levels are used to diagnose liver disease before symptoms develop. In 11 fast food dieters SGPT rose to levels suggestive of liver damage. The SGPT increases were linked to weight gain and higher sugar and Carbohydrate intake.

Weight gain after quitting smoking does not increase the risk of heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
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In a study published in Journal of American Association, researchers from Switzerland have shown that in non–diabetics, weight gain after quitting smoking does not take away the cardiovascular benefits of quitting smoking. 

There is a net cardiovascular benefit of smoking cessation despite subsequent weight gain. Smoking cessation is always beneficial for smokers. 

People gain 6 to 8 pounds of weight after quitting smoking. In the study, quitting smoking was also linked with a decreased risk of heart attack or cardiac death compared to smokers.

Weight gain after quitting smoking does not increase the risk of heart disease

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Weight gain after quitting smoking does not increase the risk of heart disease

In a study published in Journal of American Association, researchers from Switzerland have shown that in non–diabetics, weight gain after quitting smoking does not take away the cardiovascular benefits of quitting smoking.

There is a net cardiovascular benefit of smoking cessation despite subsequent weight gain. Smoking cessation is always beneficial for smokers.

People gain 6–8 pounds of weight after quitting smoking. In the study, quitting smoking was also linked with a decreased risk of heart attack or cardiac death compared to smokers.

Women who eat lot of meat are prone to weight gain

By Dr K K Aggarwal
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , , | | Comments Off on Women who eat lot of meat are prone to weight gain

Women who eat a lot of meat are apt to weigh more than those who do not. Previous studies have consistently shown that vegetarians are lighter and have a lower body mass index than their omnivorous counterparts.

A study from Brigham Young evaluated 284 premenopausal women, an average of 40 years old and did not smoke. The researchers separated the women into groups classified by low, moderate, and high meat intake per 1,000 calories consumed per day.

Over the 7–day study, the investigators found that the low–intake group ate less than 1.9 three–ounce servings of meat per day, as opposed to more than 3.18 servings for the high–intake group.

More than half (52.8%) of the women classified as having a high meat intake were obese, defined in this study as having greater than 35% body fat. Conversely, 37.3% of women in the moderate meat intake group were obese and only 15.6% of those in the low meat intake group were obese.

This was a cross–sectional study, so the findings do not show that meat causes obesity, while that could be the case, it could also be that obesity caused women to eat more meat – like more obese women following the Atkins diet, which is rich in meat.

There are a number of physiological mechanisms by which meat could fuel weight gain. Meat proteins may elevate insulin levels, and thereby growth factors, that could influence weight and percent body fat. It has also been shown that consumption of saturated fat – most of which comes from animal products – is associated with obesity.

It may be worth recognizing that eating less meat may be beneficial in a weight management program. It is possible to eat a healthy diet that is limited in meat. Alternative protein sources such as, lentils, nuts and legumes can provide sufficient protein and actually be beneficial in dieting.

Women who eat lot of meat prone to weight gain

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Women who eat lot of meat prone to weight gain

Women who eat a lot of meat are apt to weigh more than those who do not. Previous studies have consistently shown that vegetarians are lighter and have a lower body mass index than their omnivorous counterparts.

A study from Brigham Young, evaluated 284 premenopausal women, an average of 40 years old and did not smoke. The researchers separated the women into groups classified by low, moderate, and high meat intake per 1,000 calories consumed per day.

Over the 7-day study, the investigators found that the low-intake group ate less than 1.9 three-ounce servings of meat per day, as opposed to more than 3.18 servings for the high-intake group.

More than half (52.8%) of the women classified as having a high meat intake were obese, defined in this study as having greater than 35 % body fat. Conversely, 37.3% of women in the moderate meat intake group were obese and only 15.6% of those in the low meat intake group were obese.

This was a cross-sectional study, so the findings do not show that meat causes obesity, while that could be the case, it could also be that obesity caused women to eat more meat – like more obese women following the Atkins diet, which is rich in meat.

There are a number of physiological mechanisms by which meat could fuel weight gain. Meat proteins, may elevate insulin levels, and thereby growth factors, that could influence weight and percent body fat. It has also been shown that consumption of saturated fat – most of which comes from animal products – is associated with obesity.

To sum up, it may be worth recognizing that eating less meat may be beneficial in a weight management program. It is possible to eat a healthy diet that is limited in meat. Alternative protein sources such as, lentils, nuts and legumes can provide sufficient protein and actually be beneficial in dieting.

Weight Gain after Quitting Smoking Does Not Increase the Risk of Heart Disease

By
Filed Under Wellness | Tagged With: , , , | | Comments Off on Weight Gain after Quitting Smoking Does Not Increase the Risk of Heart Disease

In a study published in Journal of American Association, researchers from Switzerland have shown that in non-diabetics, weight gain after quitting smoking does not take away the cardiovascular benefits of quitting smoking.

Commenting on the study, Padma Shri & Dr.BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and National Vice-President (Elect) IMA, said that there is a net cardiovascular benefit of smoking cessation despite subsequent weight gain. Smoking cessation is always beneficial for smokers.

People gain 6-8 pounds of weight after quitting smoking.  In the study, quitting smoking was also linked with a decreased risk of heart attack or cardiac death compared to smokers.